A Bush Jacket Recommendation.

bespokewrinkles

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I was momentarily tempted by this jacket, until I noticed that the armholes are absolutely GIGANTIC. Laid flat, it's almost half the length of the jacket itself.

Pass.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
I was momentarily tempted by this jacket, until I noticed that the armholes are absolutely GIGANTIC. Laid flat, it's almost half the length of the jacket itself.

Pass.

Certainly nothing like a tailored jacket, but from my experience that's fairly typical for sportswear. It's a different aesthetic. And it is both comfortable and functional, and allows unrestricted movement. The back has tuck pleats behind the shoulder, and though they're shallow, they too are functional. An oddity is that the sleeve that forms the sleeve runs up the outside, rather than the inside of the sleeve. It's discreet to the extent that I actually didn't notice it until I was ironing it. And this also seems to work though I can't pin-point what purpose it serves.

It's just a simple, inexpensively put together garment with a few thoughtful touches to aid comfort and functionality. But I shall not be confusing it with either Steed or Caraceni. ;)
 

martinchristopher

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I have several from Polo, but they are cotton and one from ? (maybe Orvis) that is a blend.

I bought the J Peterman piece, for the price, it was a great buy, only problem is that when new, it looks so bright, needs to be weathered a little, I hosed it down and left it to hang outside for 24 hours, after that, washed it, looks great now.
 

Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
People have been known to lie their bush jackets down on the driveway and run over them a few times. Probably it's best done with a Land Rover Defender though I'm sure a Jeep would suffice.
 

bespokewrinkles

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
It's just a simple, inexpensively put together garment with a few thoughtful touches to aid comfort and functionality. But I shall not be confusing it with either Steed or Caraceni. ;)

Sorry, I didn't mean to sound like a condescending snob.

What I'm saying is that, if the average dress shirt manage to have reasonably sized armholes without causing discomfort, then this jacket has little excuse to have armholes this large. It just doesn't look very dashing when the wearer lifts his arms.
 

paul winston

Super Member
Advertiser
The classic bush jacket was the cotton coat made by Willis and Geiger and sold for years by Abercrombie and Fitch - the REAL Abercrombie and Fitch.
The bush coat falls into 2 categories- Active use and Fashion use.
The cotton and cotton blend versions can be reasonably priced and serve either use.
I had an East coast customer who bought a West coast company and wanted a jacket with lots of pockets for the trips he would be making to the coast. I made him a bush coat out of lambswool with bellows pockets and a belt. While the coat was in the shop awaiting his arrival others who were visiting saw the coat and liked the idea. We have made bush jackets using Shetland, cashmere, and tropical worsted. The jackets are custom tailored and significantly more costly than the cotton,poplin and blend versions one can buy. I made one for myself which I keep here in my office.
Paul Winston
Winston Tailors/ www.chippneckwear.com
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
Sorry, I didn't mean to sound like a condescending snob.

What I'm saying is that, if the average dress shirt manage to have reasonably sized armholes without causing discomfort, then this jacket has little excuse to have armholes this large. It just doesn't look very dashing when the wearer lifts his arms.

You certainly don't sound like a condescending snob to me, and I'm grateful for your opinion.

Your observation concerning the armhole and dress shirts is certainly true, and you may well be correct. And while I am far beyond dashing irrespective of attire, there may be different preferences for how such casual attire should fit, as this is a very different garment than a dress shirt. I've seen bespoke jackets that have been made up by shirtmakers for various individuals, and frankly liked them less well than many common RTW variants. I don't find a snug and precise fit in this instance desirable, at least for me. A jacket such as this will commonly be worn over a casual sport shirt of some form. And my shirts of this type are all RTW and cut very fully, which is my preference. And the aesthetic of the jacket is in keeping with the aesthetic of such casual wear, and the cut of the jacket lends itself to this, as it does to being a layer over a fully cut shirt. The cut works well for what it is and how I wear it, and I prefer the way it looks, particularly on me.

With this rather long-winded explanation I'm not attempting to say this is right and all other options are wrong, but rather simply that these are the reasons for my preference.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
The classic bush jacket was the cotton coat made by Willis and Geiger and sold for years by Abercrombie and Fitch - the REAL Abercrombie and Fitch.
The bush coat falls into 2 categories- Active use and Fashion use.
The cotton and cotton blend versions can be reasonably priced and serve either use.
I had an East coast customer who bought a West coast company and wanted a jacket with lots of pockets for the trips he would be making to the coast. I made him a bush coat out of lambswool with bellows pockets and a belt. While the coat was in the shop awaiting his arrival others who were visiting saw the coat and liked the idea. We have made bush jackets using Shetland, cashmere, and tropical worsted. The jackets are custom tailored and significantly more costly than the cotton,poplin and blend versions one can buy. I made one for myself which I keep here in my office.
Paul Winston
Winston Tailors/ www.chippneckwear.com

Sounds like a lovely selection of jackets. I remember some variant of bush jackets from your catalog 40+ years ago. :thumbs-up:
 

Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
The classic bush jacket was the cotton coat made by Willis and Geiger and sold for years by Abercrombie and Fitch - the REAL Abercrombie and Fitch.
The bush coat falls into 2 categories- Active use and Fashion use.
The cotton and cotton blend versions can be reasonably priced and serve either use.
I had an East coast customer who bought a West coast company and wanted a jacket with lots of pockets for the trips he would be making to the coast. I made him a bush coat out of lambswool with bellows pockets and a belt. While the coat was in the shop awaiting his arrival others who were visiting saw the coat and liked the idea. We have made bush jackets using Shetland, cashmere, and tropical worsted. The jackets are custom tailored and significantly more costly than the cotton,poplin and blend versions one can buy. I made one for myself which I keep here in my office.
Paul Winston
Winston Tailors/ www.chippneckwear.com

Something like that would make a very nice travel coat when one is not out in the bush. And I do occasionally take vacations where nothing gets shot and eaten, after all. Come to think of it, Will Boelke did a column a couple of years back about a pair of "safariana" he had made. Perhaps I ought to consider a four pocket, three/four button, half belted travel coat sometime in the future--with epaulets, possibly.
 

WA

Honors Member
When thinking of fly fisherman's vest with all of those pockets one can get rather inventive for pockets inside and out. Saw a guy who was wearing a vest he bought from a store in SeaTac airport for travel that had lots of interesting pockets inside and out, it was a very sleek vest. Custom made bush jacket has room for many options. Without special needs, why spend all the money?
 
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