Beefeater

Senior Member
I live in West Palm Beach. I have 3/2 poplin suits in olive and khaki, old BrooksCool models. Have a navy poplin from Press and seersucker. Khaki and Seersucker get the most time. Probably wouldn’t get an oyster as would be too close to my seersucker which is more grey than blue. I would also recommend a nice linen suit as well.
 

delicious_scent

Super Member
One possibility is a linen-cotton blend. The linen is very cool (in terms of temperature, that is) and the cotton will guard a bit against wrinkles, not quite as prone as linen to wrinkle. I actually don't mind some wrinkles in my clothes, they are meant to be lived in, after all.

There's also fresco cloth, but that is not easily available in ready made clothing.
I think a lot of this depends on one's own heat tolerances too.

I'm a puddle of swass in any suit or jacket past 80F, regardless of material.

I was reading an old thread, and @CLTesquire had some advice, if he is still around.
 

drpeter

Super Member
I live in West Palm Beach. I have 3/2 poplin suits in olive and khaki
You just reminded me -- I do have two poplin suits, one khaki and the other olive, both from J Press, classic Ivy style. 3/2 roll, hook vent, undarted, etc.

Heavens, it's so long since I wore a suit (except a regulation charcoal or navy for funerals and so forth), I had forgotten about these summer suits. I must find an occasion this summer to wear them, just for fun. Gatecrash a wedding, perhaps?
 

drpeter

Super Member
I think a lot of this depends on one's own heat tolerances too.

I'm a puddle of swass in any suit or jacket past 80F, regardless of material.

I was reading an old thread, and @CLTesquire had some advice, if he is still around.
I learned a new neologism - swass. I'd give the definition here, but it seems a bit contrary to good decorum, LOL. There is also, interestingly, another meaning of the same word: "cool, excellent, perfect, sexy..." Go figure.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
I learned a new neologism - swass. I'd give the definition here, but it seems a bit contrary to good decorum, LOL. There is also, interestingly, another meaning of the same word: "cool, excellent, perfect, sexy..." Go figure.
Aren't all neologism new by definition? I'm just kidding with you as I know what you meant. Heck, usually I'm just taking notes on your posts as I learn.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Well, Faders, I confess: Being an ardent lover of words and language, especially the English language, I couldn't resist putting the qualifier "new" before neologism. Just to see who would take the bait, LOL. Thank you for doing so.

In a sense, while you are correct in pointing out that a neologism refers to a newly invented word, the qualifier says that it is new to me. So apart from fishing for takers, it is also quite defensible.

And sometimes, writers use this sort of thing for effect: As in the Bard describing Brutus' thrust on Caesar's body as "the most unkindest cut of all" Or many of us lesser mortals saying most unique, and so on.

Basta.
 

TKI67

Elite Member
Well, Faders, I confess: Being an ardent lover of words and language, especially the English language, I couldn't resist putting the qualifier "new" before neologism. Just to see who would take the bait, LOL. Thank you for doing so.

In a sense, while you are correct in pointing out that a neologism refers to a newly invented word, the qualifier says that it is new to me. So apart from fishing for takers, it is also quite defensible.

And sometimes, writers use this sort of thing for effect: As in the Bard describing Brutus' thrust on Caesar's body as "the most unkindest cut of all" Or many of us lesser mortals saying most unique, and so on.

Basta.
I'll bet you chew Double Mint gum.
 

drpeter

Super Member
I don't chew gum at all, but I get the reference. Although the Wrigley folks claim that it is double strength peppermint, and hence the name. Correct me if I am wrong, TKI.
 

Peak and Pine

Connoisseur
No idea who he is, but I want that exact suit. Color and lapel are perfect.
Aside.
It's not Pete Buttigieg, but I've seen pictures of Mayor Pete wearing suit and tie and cycling like that through DC traffic. (On his way to figuring out how to bring government funded double decker buses to every town besides Las Vegas which already has them and which I've ridden, so cool.) The tobacco suit above, very fine. Careful about getting chain grease on the cuffs. But many of these summer suits are 60/40 and capable of being washed.
 

drpeter

Super Member
My hometown in India had British double decker buses, post office red, as we used to call them (post boxes are red in most of India, just like in Britain). I loved riding in them -- the buses, not the post boxes.

You know, Peaks, I thought the same thing too: I ride my bikes a lot, and I usually have those little straps that you can place around your trouser cuffs to prevent grease from getting on them.
 
Last edited:

mrm21711

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
If you lived in a place with long, hot summers and were picking a summer suit and had narrowed it to oyster poplin, olive poplin, or blue and white seersucker, which would you pick? Main uses would be church, likely outdoors.
+1 for Olive.

I struggle with the practicality and usage Id get out of Seersucker. I purchased a Seersucker suit from O'Connell's a few years ago and return it as I wasn't thrilled with the amount of shoulder padding. However, I felt like there are limited times Id actually wear a seersucker suit. More likely to wear the jacket or pants separately with other things.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Regarding the grease issue, I have a folding bike which has the chain entirely enclosed to avoid grease issues.
I'm an avid cyclist. Having built bikes from the frame up with vintage and period-correct componentry (gruppos), I can assure you that chain guards that cover the top of the chain do exist but are a bit of a mixed blessing. They protect your trousers from grease, but they make getting at the chain for repairs (removing links, tightening the chain, etc.) a harder task. Even the seasonal cleaning of the chain with a lube (like White Lightning) is tedious with a guard.

Now the fully enclosed chain is often found in vintage Raleighs, Humbers, etc. They look very retro and nice. But these chain cases are, of course, much more of a pain to remove. I have three Raleighs in my stable (two Superbes and a Sport) and I wanted a chain case for one of them, picked up in the after-market. I was persuaded not to do this by my local bike shop chap, who said they were hard to maintain.

My solution is simple and elegant (sort of, LOL). I use trouser clips or else tuck the tops of my trousers into my socks. I also roll up the right trouser leg since this is the side where the chain is. Most of the summer, I wear shorts for distance cycling, so it is only of concern when I have to wear trousers. If I must wear a suit, I have an even simpler solution: I drive!
 

TKI67

Elite Member
Indeed. I have seersucker sportcoats and trousers, but they were bought separately and not as a suit. And I do use both. I too am unsure if I will get any wear from an entire suit.
I get plenty of opportunity to wear seersucker suits during hot Texas summers. When I worked for state government our board meetings were in the Capitol and were casual in the summer. One of my favorite outfits for Texas casual in the Capitol was khakis, white OCBD, seersucker jacket, and brown calf boots. I have never liked using seersucker trousers other than as part of a suit.
 
Your email address will not be publicly visible. We will only use it to contact you to confirm your post.

IMPORTANT: BEFORE POSTING PLEASE CHECK THE DATE OF THE LAST POST OF THIS THREAD. IF IT'S VERY OLD, PLEASE CONSIDER REGISTERING FIRST, AND STARTING A NEW THREAD ABOUT THIS TOPIC.