Tweedlover

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
For me retirement, the pandemic, and the loss of appreciable weight and girth thanks to Noom made it necessary to build a new wardrobe. In our increasingly hot climate it was clear I needed to build a suitable hot weather casual wardrobe first, and the basics were shorts (Patagonia standups in Pelican, Murray's Nantucket reds and greens, and madras), polos (O'Connell's navy, pink, white, dark green, and raspberry), khakis (O'Connell's stone, khaki, and olive, and Murray's reds and greens), O'Connell's grey worsteds and a Southwick blazer. I got an O'Connell's glen plaid tweed in the hope of cooler weather, and O'Connell's unfused OCBDs in white, blue, blue university stripe, pink university stripe, and pink. Still to purchase, a charcoal suit and a navy Shetland. My 4" smaller belts are surcingle in yellow, navy, and Breton red and a cordovan to go with my tassels and LHS in no. 8. Fortunately my feet stayed about the same size, enabling me also to keep my suede LHS. I did get a new pair of Maliseets. I may get a doeskin blazer for winter. Mercifully the old Beaufort still feels about right when the liner is in. We'll see. So I built instead of condensing, and that was all I felt I needed, probably too much, but I am pushing 72 and shouldn't need much if anything more. Nice as it is to be a 41/34 again, it was sad taking the 44s and 46s and the 38 trousers to the resale shop. Glad I got to hang onto the challis, madder, knit, and repp ties. Wonder how long until they are called into action?

As I return from my hiatus I plan to stay on the Trad forum only, where the greatest depth of controversy is what we call our style.
While I did a little thrifting prior to losing 50 pounds over 10 years ago, the weight loss necessitated kicking it into high gear. Had to replace most of my wardrobe and couldn't afford to buy much new. The majority of my wardrobe, as a result, casual and dress, is thrifted.
 

TKI67

Advanced Member
While I did a little thrifting prior to losing 50 pounds over 10 years ago, the weight loss necessitated kicking it into high gear. Had to replace most of my wardrobe and couldn't afford to buy much new. The majority of my wardrobe, as a result, casual and dress, is thrifted.
And IMO Etsy is one of the better sources for things Trads like at prices that are reasonable.
 

Patrick06790

Connoisseur
I've tried to keep some sort of standards during this thing. I'm batting about .300, which is great...in baseball.

I managed to lose about 20 pounds and I plan to keep it that way. So I took four big piles of stuff to the thrift shop, where I was greeted with hosannas and salaams. (They have a hard time getting donations of men's clothing, except for t-shirts that say "World's Greatest Grandpa.")

So now I'm down to a gigantic wardrobe, compared to a super-colossal ultra mega stupendous one.

Next step in the purge -- shoes. I have too many that never get worn. Like spectators. And loafers. Any 9Ds out there? Drop me a line.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Salaams too, huh? And in Connecticut as well!
This thrift shop is one I must visit. Perhaps there might be a Pasha or two, or even a Sultan or Shah-en-Shah lolling about, LOL.

That said, I envy you. I am confronted with the need for space, and hence a need to purge clothing. It's going to be one heck of a spring cleaning around here.
 
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eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
I too have recently been experiencing an inexplicable urge to purge. It all started when I became familiar with Japanese author Fumio Sasaki's writings titled Hello Habits: A Minimalists Guide to A Better Life and Goodbye Things: The New Japanese Minimalism. These two books planted the seeds of discontent with things and recent readings of the shopping masses ever growing loss of interest in collectibles, have nurtured a veritable panic attack within me (LOL)....how large of a hoard am I going to leave my heirs to contend with, when I'm gone? At the current rate I am reducing the hoard (one item/garment/pair at a time) I will be able to clean up this mess if I can hang in there to the grand old age of 126 years! Am I going to make it? LOL. ;)
 

drpeter

Super Member
I am taking the opposite tack, Eagle, and I have had success with it in the past -- Dumping large numbers of items en masse, gathered in heavy duty plastic bags, in all available locales, not just charities, and including a favourite, a large container located at the edge of a parking lot where you can shove a bundle of clothes in and let the collectors worry about it. It is immensely satisfying to do this. Unfortunately, it is not possible to do this with books, CDs or DVDs one does not want -- they all go to Half-Price books, and that takes multiple trips to the nearest branch, in Madison two hours away. Oh well, real soon. That's when the winter of our discontent is going to be made into glorious summer by the Dukes of Purge.
 

TKI67

Advanced Member
The urge to purge to which Eagle refers is fascinating. I have generally tried to keep "stuff" under control, probably an effect of growing up in a Navy household and moving often. When we downsized a little from a very large house (big enough there were empty closets) to one that is merely large, we purged of some necessity. I was struck as I cleared out cabinets in the kitchen at how many half bags of beans, tied off with twist ties, there were behind the items at the fronts of the shelves. I vowed not to store things where they were not readily visible. Years later when I read and implemented Marie Kondo I was pleased to see that she agreed, and her method of folding and storing clothing is wonderful. I can pull out a drawer and see my five pairs of shorts and five polos all at once, no stacking! Another benefit I am now noticing is that all of my winter woolens all fit neatly in one of those squared off garment storage bags along with the wool blankets. I have long been a proponent of buying nice things to use well for many years. It is an approach that is very harmonious with not acquiring too much. Even so, I feel a twinge of guilt for being blessed with as much as I have. As Marie Kondo recommends, every item I own brings me joy.

On the subject of purging, following Marie Kondo's recommended method and order is astoundingly effective. By the time you get to keepsakes and memorabilia you will have a better self understanding of the difference between things and memories. Our younger generation really understands this well. I think that it may be because we are interposed between them and the generation that was so impacted by the Great Depression.
 

TKI67

Advanced Member
I am taking the opposite tack, Eagle, and I have had success with it in the past -- Dumping large numbers of items en masse, gathered in heavy duty plastic bags, in all available locales, not just charities, and including a favourite, a large container located at the edge of a parking lot where you can shove a bundle of clothes in and let the collectors worry about it. It is immensely satisfying to do this. Unfortunately, it is not possible to do this with books, CDs or DVDs one does not want -- they all go to Half-Price books, and that takes multiple trips to the nearest branch, in Madison two hours away. Oh well, real soon. That's when the winter of our discontent is going to be made into glorious summer by the Dukes of Purge.
Reminds me of a recent Lent where my discipline was forty bags in forty days!
 

Tweedlover

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I too have recently been experiencing an inexplicable urge to purge. It all started when I became familiar with Japanese author Fumio Sasaki's writings titled Hello Habits: A Minimalists Guide to A Better Life and Goodbye Things: The New Japanese Minimalism. These two books planted the seeds of discontent with things and recent readings of the shopping masses ever growing loss of interest in collectibles, have nurtured a veritable panic attack within me (LOL)....how large of a hoard am I going to leave my heirs to contend with, when I'm gone? At the current rate I am reducing the hoard (one item/garment/pair at a time) I will be able to clean up this mess if I can hang in there to the grand old age of 126 years! Am I going to make it? LOL. ;)
We have a large house filled with all manner of stuff. I, too, have occasionally thought of how our only child will have to really work to clear it all out after the last of us is gone. I know how hard of work my wife and her sister went through to clear her step-mother's house after she died.
 

fred johnson

Senior Member
I have purged by wardrobe down to 2 blazers, 3 harris tweed jackets , 4 pairs of flannels, 1 poplin suit, 1 flannel suit, 1 lightweight wool suit, 2 lightweight wool pants, 3 tan cords and several khakis. Plus a small assortment of OCBD shirts, ties ,polo shirts, loafers, and bean mocs. I find that these days even this assortment is too much.
 

TKI67

Advanced Member
I have purged by wardrobe down to 2 blazers, 3 harris tweed jackets , 4 pairs of flannels, 1 poplin suit, 1 flannel suit, 1 lightweight wool suit, 2 lightweight wool pants, 3 tan cords and several khakis. Plus a small assortment of OCBD shirts, ties ,polo shirts, loafers, and bean mocs. I find that these days even this assortment is too much.
I am more or less in the same place. Two tweed jackets, a winter blazer and a summer blazer, a Madras jacket, a dark grey tropical worsted suit, five OCBDs and a French cuff point collar, two Bean plain collar shirts (one in blue canvas and one in blue denim), one pair of khakis, one pair of stone poplins, Nantucket reds and greens, one pair of grey flannels, one pair of grey tropical worsteds, two Bean five pocket cords, a few pairs of LHS and one pair of tassel loafers, Sperrys and Maliseets, and, as mentioned previously, five pairs of shorts and five polos. Oh, and navy and grey Shetland crewnecks. It is enough that I always feel I can dress well, but it is also a wardrobe where each piece gets used regularly.

An interesting reflection: My father had my penchant for order. When he died my brother and I attended to his apartment in an afternoon. My mother in law was far more acquisitive. It took months to downsize her enough to wedge her stuff into a two bedroom retirement cottage and a couple of arduous weeks to clear it out when she died.
 
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Tweedlover

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I have purged by wardrobe down to 2 blazers, 3 harris tweed jackets , 4 pairs of flannels, 1 poplin suit, 1 flannel suit, 1 lightweight wool suit, 2 lightweight wool pants, 3 tan cords and several khakis. Plus a small assortment of OCBD shirts, ties ,polo shirts, loafers, and bean mocs. I find that these days even this assortment is too much.
I have absolutely no need for more clothes. Have around a dozen winter weight shirts, several fleeces, and 13 sweaters. As to summer weight, I have 19 button up and polo and an additional 6 T-shirts. When I retired, I hung on to 5 sport coats and 1 suit. Given retirement, not a lot of call for them. Shoe-wise, I'm pretty well set with 4 pair to wear in colder months and 4 for warmer. I'm very easy on clothes and have some shirts I've had for 20+ years I still wear as style and fit are fine still.
 
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