Anglophilia and American Trad

dpihl

Super Member
Fashion Fundamentals
The Ten Underlying Principles
for Men and Women


1. Conservatism
2. Neatness
3. Attention to detail
4. Practicality
5. Quality
6. Natural Fibers
7. Anglophilia

"The British have a lot to answer for: Shetland sweaters, Harris tweeds, Burberrys, tartans, regimental ties."

8. Specific Color Blindness
9. The Sporting Look
10. Androgyny
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One might add a few hundred other items to the OPH's list, but this hardly seems necessary. The simple fact of the matter is that we owe the British a debt of gratitude.

Oddly, Brooks Brothers claims credit for many of these same things in their advertising copy.
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The Golden Fleece symbol was adopted as the company's trademark. A sheep suspended in a ribbon had long been a symbol of British woolen merchants. Dating from the 15th century, it had been the emblem of the Knights of the Golden Fleece, founded by Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy. In ancient Greek mythology, a magical flying ram, or Golden Fleece, was sought by Jason and the Argonauts.

1890 - THE SILK FOULARD NECKTIE

Brooks Senior Partner, Francis G. Lloyd visited England and returned with the silk Foulard necktie, which was quickly adopted into American wardrobes. Many of the tie designs selected during those visits are still used today.

1896 - THE BUTTON-DOWN POLO SHIRT

John Brooks, grandson of the founder, made fashion history by introducing the button-down polo collar shirt. His design inspiration came after attending an English polo match where he observed the players' shirts secured with buttons to keep them from flapping in the wind. The shirt became an instant success and soon one of the best-selling Brooks Brothers items.

1904 - THE SHETLAND SWEATER

The shetland sweater was introduced to the Brooks Brothers collection. Originally hand-made by peasants of the Shetland Islands, the process was refined by Brooks Brothers and was soon to become an American classic.

1910 - THE POLO COAT

The English polo coat was introduced to the U.S. by Brooks Brothers. Originally white with pearl buttons, it was later offered in grey and the classic camel hair. By the 1930’s, more polo coats were being worn by the students at Miss Porter’s School for Girls than at any boys’ prep school.

1920 - THE REPP TIE

One of the trends which was established by Brooks Brothers in the twenties was the diagonal repp tie. Fashioned after British regimental or club ties, we Americanized this soon-to-be classic neckwear by reversing the direction of the stripes. By the fifties, the repp tie became synonymous with Brooks Brothers and the "Ivy League Look".

1920 - MADRAS

During the Twenties, our customers were looking for proper but more comfortable clothing to accompany leisure activity. In another fashion first, Brooks Brothers introduced Indian madras to the United States, with offerings in jackets, trousers, and beachwear for the American buyer.

1930 - SEERSUCKER

The lightweight summer fabric of puckered cotton, or seersucker, was made available for the first time in America and introduced by Brooks Brothers in frock coats. The most ideal type of warm weather clothing, seersucker was hailed as a great clothing innovation.

1949 - THE PINK SHIRT FOR WOMEN

In 1949, Brooks Brothers finally devoted a small corner of the store to a women’s department. Vogue Magazine featured the pink button-down shirt for women, creating an overnight fashion sensation.

1949 - ARGYLE SOCKS

Brooks’ president John Clark Wood discovered argyle when he noticed a golfer wearing a pair of strikingly patterned, hand-knit socks. Mr. Wood borrowed the pattern to become the first American retailer to manufacture argyle hose.

1965 - PEAL & Company

Throughout much of the 20th century, Brooks Brothers enjoyed an exclusive licensing agreement with the distinguished London firm of Peal & Company. Peal had built custom-made shoes for Lord Wellington, Winston Churchill, and Fred Astaire. When Peal went out of business in 1965, Brooks purchased the name, as well as Peal’s lasts and patterns.

1988 - MARKS & SPENCER

In April 1988, the venerable British department store chain Marks & Spencer purchased Brooks Brothers. A $7 million restoration took place at the Madison Avenue flagship store.

2003 - 185TH ANNIVERSARY

In the fall of 2003, Brooks Brothers celebrated 185 years of classic American style. An advertising campaign was launched to celebrate Brooks Brothers' incredible heritage. We are proud to have become an institution that has shaped the American style of dress through fashion innovation, fine quality, personal service, and exceptional value in our products.
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Brooks Brothers has lately distanced themselves from other inventions in their past. They invented a two-button, big shouldered, darted jacket style for President Kennedy, who had to wear some kind of back brace and didn't want his stomach to protrude past his chest. They also once claimed to have been the first to offer wash-and-wear clothing, and a synthetic fabric once called "Terylene".
https://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/blpolyester.htm

Ben Silver's company history is a bit more difficult to cut and paste, but it's essentially the same story. They attribute their success to the navy blazer, gold and enamel Blazer Buttons, and repp ties made from imported British silk.
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Although there are competing versions of the origin of the term "Blazer", there is no denying that 1. The term is British in origin, and 2. The gold colored buttons were first issued to the crew of H.M.S. Blazer. HMS means "Her Majesty's Ship" if you have forgotten.

Prevailing wisdom these days seems to favor the notion that the term Blazer predates the gold button thing, and that the name is mere coincidence. Blazer probably comes from the jackets in Blazing colors worn at college regatta events.

No doubt the Brooks Brothers "sack" shape is an American take on a traditional British jacket, but I'm not sure it's fair to call it an American "invention".
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For more than six decades, Cable Car Clothiers/Robert Kirk, Ltd. has offered classic natural shoulder clothing to men across the country—and around the world—who appreciate quality without compromise. Our excellent relationships with the premier menswear manufacturers in the British Isles and in the United States have allowed us to be a dependable resource—indeed, often the exclusive one—for many hard-to-find items, such as our traditional three-button natural shoulder sportcoats and vested suits.

When you visit San Francisco, you will find us in a charming, historical building at 200 Bush Street, corner of Sansome, conveniently located in the heart of the Financial District. Our store is filled with many more items than we can picture on this website. We hope you will stop in and browse our collection.

It is with great pleasure that we welcome you to our website, our store, and our 63rd year of offering our customers the finest in classic British menswear.
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Southwick was founded in 1929 by Nicholas and Vito Grieco, but the Southwick tradition has roots that can be traced even further back. In the 1920's, the Grieco brothers ran a thriving tailor shop on New York's 5th Avenue. Their custom made suits embodied a fundamentally British attitude toward clothing -- the natural shoulder philosophy. This was somewhat iconoclastic for the times, as fashion dictated a more exaggerated look -- heavy padding at the shoulder, more severe tapering at the waist, deep pleats. While this '20's look becomes trendy from time to time, the natural shoulder style -- with its simpler, cleaner lines -- has become a time-honored classic.

Distinguished by its soft, natural shoulder construction and relaxed fit, Southwick's style is designed to reflect your own. Our label has been worn by by those who wish to enhance their own identity, not replace it.

Much of the philosophy of that custom tailor shop endures today at Southwick. Keeping Southwick in the capable hands of a limited number of fine retailers is one of the many ways we have of maintaining our exceptional standards of quality.
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quote:Originally posted by Andy

Trying:

You need a copy of The Encyclopedia of Men's Clothes!! :D

Twill -- one of the basic fabric weaves producing a characteristic diagonal raised pattern.

Khaki (Chino) History:

In 1846 Sir Harry Lumsden commanding an English troop in Punjab, India traded in his bright white Khakis for pajama bottoms to find relief from the heat. To disguise them he colored them to blend with the local terrain using mazari, a native plant. Thus the birth of Khaki, the Hindu (Urdu) word for “dustâ€.

As a by-product, Lumsden discovered that the new Khaki pants were more suitable in battle than the white pants, and red tunic. Blending in was good. Khaki is a color, but is now synonymous with a military twill pant.

Khaki went from India to the Kaffir War in South Africa in 1851, and then after the Sudan Wars and Afghan Campaign of 1878 it was adopted in 1884 as the official uniform. The same year Khaki-color dye was patented, and was adopted by other armies, including America for the Spanish- American War in 1898.

Although not all armies were as willing to give up their brightly colored uniforms:

“Les pantaloons rouge, ils sont la France!â€
-- Members of the French Army

Khaki color is a light tan, dark khaki or olive drab is a green or olive shade.

Chinos were military issue pants, which were made in China. The British Khakis found their way into China where they were duplicated and sold to American soldiers in the Philippines for uniforms during World War I. Chinos don’t have to be twill, but are often a firm weave of cotton. Chinos can be Khaki color. The military style had no pleats and was tapered at the leg bottom to conserve fabric. This pants style remained popular for the military through the Second World War. When soldiers returned to civilian life they continued to wear their military chinos especially to college.

Brooks Bros started carrying the chinos in 1942.

Bill Thomas founder of Bills Khakis discovered WWII style khaki pants in a army-navy surplus store in 1984 while he was in college in Ohio. When he was told they were no longer available, he begin making his own in Reading, Pennsylvania using the original military patterns, which called for 8.5 ounce cotton twill.

Andy
Possess your own copy of The Encyclopedia of Men's Clothes (click here)!

PS: Drill is a durable twill weave with diagonal striping and a compact or tight texture. It has a weave similar to denim, but drill is usually piece dyed. The British first used drill for colonial uniforms.


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I'll be the first to admit that all of the above citations fail to interdistinguish between the "British Isles", England, "Great Brittain", and "The United Kingdom". Calling "Tartan" an English thing was as silly as calling button-down "Polo" shirts an American "invention". Furthermore, one would have to go back to the Colonial period to justify calling "Bermuda Shorts" a "British" thing.

So you know, I have no dog in this fight. My love for British style sometimes gets in the way of my purist approach to American "Trad". Furthermore, I am an outsider in the "real" world of American Trad. It's been two or three years since I've paid full ticket on any high-end clothes.

But all of this self-absorbed "We invented the best everything" attitude must not go unchallenged. It's high time somebody schooled you Ivy leaguers about the real history of Trad clothing.

America didn't invent the button down collar. Brooks Brothers merely popularized it.

Speaking of collars, America's Hannah Lord Montague invented the detachable collar. America's Cluett Peabody and Company invented several mass-production techniques carried on in England today (presumably by the likes of Luke Eyres). Sanford Cluett invented the sanforization process that made it possible to buy clothes off-the- peg and expect them to fit relatively well. Troy, New York used to be the shirt manufacturing center of the world. It was also the shirt making sweat shop captial, and many people died in fires, while locked in the workrooms of Troy's most famous industry.

So there you have it.

The British are keeping those quintessentially American detachable collars alive through Jermyn Street's most elite shirtmaking firms.

Ben Silver has kept many of Brittain's best mills afloat through a series of buyouts and agreements (so I am told).

J. Press of Japan has kept their American parent company afloat as a means of legitimizing their sales of "America's Trad Look" in Japan.

And now all of the American-style blue jeans are being manufactured in Asian countries. Not that Levi Strauss was on the verge of collapse.

And Italian billionaire Claudio del Vecchio is reportedly struggling daily to keep Brooks Brothers afloat. See

American Trad indeed!
 

Vettriano Man

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
As one of the leading bearers of the Union flag around these parts, let me be the first to thank you David very much for such honourable flattery. Unfortunately we Brits are just too modest to take any credit ourselves! [^]
 

DougNZ

Elite Member
A fantastic and very thorough post, dpihl. From a historical point of view it quite possibly deserved sticky status. Well done!

This is precisely the reason why Trad is Trad is Trad, with a few regional differences.
 

Trimmer

Super Member
An excellent post. Thank you.

The strength of this forum is the breadth of its membership - in both the sartorial and geographical senses.

Exploring difference (Trad v Fogey; US v UK)makes for interesting discussion. Being able to do so is a mark of civilization and democracy. Being willing to do is a sign of courtesy and respect.

Trimmer
 

dpihl

Super Member
quote:Originally posted by fruitymetcalfe

dpihl, good post. Say a bit more about your Principle #8, will you? Don't think I get it yet...

F.

That was a quote from the Official Preppy Handbook, page 122.

#8 Specific Color Blindness

"Primary colors and brilliant pastels are worn indiscriminately by men and women alike, in preposterous combinations. In some subcultures, hot pink on men might be considered a little peculiar; Preppies take it for granted."
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And on page 156
The Virtues of Pink and Green​
The wearing of the pink and the green is the surest and the quickest way to group identification within the prep set. There is little room for doubt or confusion when you see these colors together-- no one else in his right mind would sport such a chromatically improbably juxtaposition.

Not just any shade of pink and green will do. Seafoam green and girl-baby pink would be as unthinkable as a wide tie or Famolare Wedgies [A thick soled Ladie's shoe of the period]. No, this is unashamed, outrageous go-for broke hot pink and hubba bubba electric wild lime green. . .
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References to Lilly Pullitzer also echo this theme of loud, wild colors as a very "Preppy" look. https://www.lillypulitzer.com/

This tennet of Preppy-ism is probably the whole reason AAAC members want to distinguish between Preppy and Trad in the first place. Your average man on the street (who experienced the Preppy fad of the 1980s) associates the term "Preppy" with whimsical colours more than they associate it with Khaki trousers and OCBDs. I find this interesting.

In the early 1980's, I had a difficult time finding pure cotton shirts and khaki twill trousers in Salt Lake City. When the Preppy Handbook came out, it caused local retailers to rethink their product mix.

Nowadays, all-cotton khakis and lt. blue OCBDs are so common that people consider them wardrobe staples, no matter what style of dress they aspire to.

They became the uniform of Kinko's employees, as very few customers objected to the look. Other retailers opted for polo shirts, which were also hard to find (unless you were willing to pay a premium for Izod-brand shirts, which at the time were licensed manufacturers of Renae Lacoste's logo apparel).

The ubiquity of Polo-style shirts is another OPH legacy. You can find all-cotton khakis, polos, or OCBDS at Wal Mart for approximately twenty US dollars today. Parts of the Preppy/Trad look have definately become mainstream. No longer the exclusive domain of Ivy League grads!

By the way, where does the term "Oxford Cloth" come from? I presume it
is the same as the origin of "Oxford Shoes" (and the Oxford Dictionary), but I can't remember for sure. Was it in Cambridge? :D

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: David G. Pihl :
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rl1856

Senior Member
quote:And Italian billionaire Claudio del Vecchio is reportedly struggling daily to keep Brooks Brothers afloat. See



Where did you get your information regarding the financial condition of Brooks Brothers ?

The article you provided a link to is an overview of the company without any reference to the current financial status.

Best,

Ross
 

Harris

Elite Member
I am an American-style Trad. And an Anglophile. The two work together (and compliment each other) perfectly...until the matters of darts and pleats are raised.

Manton and other well-informed gents have insisted that the British look is and has (always) been darted. Interesting, then, that as I look at old photos of Churchill and Evelyn Waugh and J.M. Keynes and watch Chariots of Fire for the twentieth time, I can't find darts. Nor, for that matter, pleats.

So...I am left to conclude that British style has not always been the tucked, darted, form-fitting military-style cut for which Huntsman (and other Savile Row tailors) are known. When did that military style cut begin to dominate (even to the point of inspiring Ralph Lauren)? Who knows. But I do know is that what a lot of Englishmen were wearing in the 1920s resembles what American men were wearing in the 1940s--a loose-fitting, undarted, soft (lapel) rolled, natural shouldered garment...sans pleats.

Why does all this matter? Not much, really. Unless one takes seriously the connection between old TNSIL style and an Anglophilia that was inspired by pre WWII Englishmen.









Harris
 

dpihl

Super Member
quote:Originally posted by rl1856

quote:And Italian billionaire Claudio del Vecchio is reportedly struggling daily to keep Brooks Brothers afloat. See



Where did you get your information regarding the financial condition of Brooks Brothers ?

The article you provided a link to is an overview of the company without any reference to the current financial status.

Best,

Ross


Perhaps I should just retract that statement without qualification. We live in a world where fortunes are won and lost in the blink of an eye, and any company's financial picture can change from one day to the next. Besides, what do I know about such things? It's not as if I have an inside track. Here is a link a very interesting article about Brooks Brothers. It's a few years old now, but enlightening nonetheless.

I think I've read other articles discussing the challenge of returning Brooks to their former glory, in a post 9/11 world where OCBDs (and other parts of the BB legacy) are plentiful and cheap. I guess on an intuitive level, it just makes sense that this could be challenging and problematic.

My copy of Style and The Man (by Alan Flusser) is out on loan to a friend right now. However, it was there that Mr. Flusser gave me the impression that the Japanese buyout of J. Press was a way to keep the parent afloat and also legitimize local sales. It's similar to Bic's purchase of Sheaffer, Sanford's purchases of Parker and Waterman, Ford's purchase of Jaguar, and Auburn's purchase of Deusenberg. In other words, owning a slow-selling, high end product gives one "street cred" in the public imagination, and it adds cachet to lower end, more popular products. One "Deusey" of an idea, don't you think?

I don't remember if Flusser's book discussed the Ben Silver thing. I'm pretty sure it was one of their catalogues that told of buying out England's last remaining manufacturer of true "madders". I had the privelege of driving a friend of the Prenners up to Alta this ski season, and they told me a lot more about Ben Silver's aquistions in England. Perhaps I shouldn't engage in hearsay, especially not in such a pulic forum!

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: David G. Pihl :
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Rich

Super Member
quote:Originally posted by Harris

I am an American-style Trad. And an Anglophile. The two work together (and compliment each other) perfectly...until the matters of darts and pleats are raised.

Manton and other well-informed gents have insisted that the British look is and has (always) been darted. Interesting, then, that as I look at old photos of Churchill and Evelyn Waugh and J.M. Keynes and watch Chariots of Fire for the twentieth time, I can't find darts. Nor, for that matter, pleats.

So...I am left to conclude that British style has not always been the tucked, darted, form-fitting military-style cut for which Huntsman (and other Savile Row tailors) are known. When did that military style cut begin to dominate (even to the point of inspiring Ralph Lauren)? Who knows. But I do know is that what a lot of Englishmen were wearing in the 1920s resembles what American men were wearing in the 1940s--a loose-fitting, undarted, soft (lapel) rolled, natural shouldered garment...sans pleats.

Why does all this matter? Not much, really. Unless one takes seriously the connection between old TNSIL style and an Anglophilia that was inspired by pre WWII Englishmen.



Very interesting. If only we had free access to the records of the Savile Row tailors. They must keep everything. Two centuries of detailed information on trends in cut, cloths and techniques. Enough to keep quite a few postgraduates busy.
 

septa

Senior Member
Perhaps it was King Edward VIII/Duke of Windsor that led the change. I don't know who his tailor was, but he seems to have favored the military cut. It would fit with the timing, and make sense--without a titled figure to legitimate the new style, along with the depression and the war American traditional clothing remained rooted in the older English style of the 20s and 30s...the gentlemen in the pictures were clearly fogeys ins their own day (isn't the Waugh picture from the 50s?), favoring a slightly antiquated style.
 

DougNZ

Elite Member
quote:Why does all this matter? Not much, really. Unless one takes seriously the connection between old TNSIL style and an Anglophilia that was inspired by pre WWII Englishmen.

Precisely, Harris, what does this matter? Other than for historical interest, one either prefers darts and / or pleats, or does not, or wears both darted and undarted, pleated and unpleated as one's mood dictates.

This forum has uncovered historical Englishmen in sacks, historical notch lapel dinner jackets, and historical black vests with white tie. All our 'rules' have had flaws exposed. I'm not saying 'do what you want' but wear your choice of clothing in a stylish and considered manner that suits you.
 

DougNZ

Elite Member
quote:perhaps it was King Edward VIII/Duke of Windsor that led the change. I don't know who his tailor was, but he seems to have favored the military cut.

I'm not so sure. This is the man that turned up to dinners in a dinner jacket when everyone else was wearing a tailcoat, and who popularised the turn down collar over the stiff wing collar. His father was more of a military man, and the Duke of Windsor softened his look considerably.
 

tom22

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Sometime in the 80s there was a not great but interesting movie called "Swing Kids". worth a look. A dramatization of the young teens in Germany who embraced our culture and didn't survive. At the beginning of the movie there is a frame that contains the written theme: They loved three things: American movies, British Fashion and Swing Music!
surviving in today's america, where all of my values have been rejected, that about sums it up for me, as well.
 

winn

New Member
Harris -

I note in this last image that the painting (or framed photograph) behind Mr. Keynes and Mr. Stettinius is of the Rotunda at Mr. Jefferson's University. It makes sense since Edward Stettinius graduated from there in 1924.

Cheers,
Winn
 

Smudger

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
David and Harris,
Brillant work David, and Harris you always come through with very informative gems!! I totally agree with your notion of Anglophilia as being the major cultural current in traditional men's fashion of the 20th Century. The Norwegian Shoes, 'weejuns' came to England and then to the U.S. between the world wars. The holes in brogues were through and through and were worn by workers in damp and flooded areas and served to drain water; again, from the British Isles notably Scotland. If I am not mistaken, some British khaki's of World War II fame were pleated. I shall try to dig up some photos which show that detail of clothing.

One aspect of British culture which was impressed on me by a very Anglophilic-or more accurately British loving man (my professor father)- was that of Tom Brown and the notion of masculine Christianity which emphasized manly sports to discipline the mind and body. Please correct this quotation if I am wrong as I do not have the book with me now, but I think remember Tom Brown saying that "one hour of playing rugby was equal to two years in the life of an ordinary man". Eric Liddell was indeed one of the nicest Christian man who had prodigous athletic prowess.

The Duke of Windsor introduced many different things into men's fashion
which do not fit neatly into our notion of American traditional style.

To David and also to Harris, I bow in humble subservience,

Respectively,
Bill

Mollydog
 

Harris

Elite Member
quote:Originally posted by Smudger

David and Harris,
Brillant work David, and Harris you always come through with very informative gems!! I totally agree with your notion of Anglophilia as being the major cultural current in traditional men's fashion of the 20th Century. The Norwegian Shoes, 'weejuns' came to England and then to the U.S. between the world wars. The holes in brogues were through and through and were worn by workers in damp and flooded areas and served to drain water; again, from the British Isles notably Scotland. If I am not mistaken, some British khaki's of World War II fame were pleated. I shall try to dig up some photos which show that detail of clothing.

One aspect of British culture which was impressed on me by a very Anglophilic-or more accurately British loving man (my professor father)- was that of Tom Brown and the notion of masculine Christianity which emphasized manly sports to discipline the mind and body. Please correct this quotation if I am wrong as I do not have the book with me now, but I think remember Tom Brown saying that "one hour of playing rugby was equal to two years in the life of an ordinary man". Eric Liddell was indeed one of the nicest Christian man who had prodigous athletic prowess.

The Duke of Windsor introduced many different things into men's fashion
which do not fit neatly into our notion of American traditional style.

To David and also to Harris, I bow in humble subservience,

Respectively,
Bill

Mollydog


I had heard (more than once) that "Weejuns" hit the shores of England well before they made it to America. Apparently they didn't "catch on" in England the way they did in the U.S.A.
 

dpihl

Super Member
quote:Originally posted by Andy

Nathan Detroit:

That was one of the afflictions when the original "Penny" Loafer style was introduced. Some history (from The Encyclopedia of Men's Clothes:

Bass “Weejunsâ€: In 1876, George Henry Bass created the G.H. Bass shoe company, and in 1910 he introduced the camp “Moccâ€, a soft leather moccasin that challenged the hard dress shoes of the day. In 1936 the Bass Shoe Co introduced an adaptation of a Norwegian fisherman moccasin style shoe named “Weejun†combining “Norwegian†and “Injunâ€. Weejuns are also referred to as penny loafers because of a semi-pocket featured on the vamp, into which a penny can be slipped.

Penny loafers were as popular as saddle shoes in the 40’s and 50’s.


Maybe now with inflation you could wad up a $100 bill and stuff it in there (good for emergencies).



Andy

Not really sure about "Weejuns" being in England first. The moccasin toe, after all, was a Native American thing. However, there were plenty of Brits who were taken with the idea of moccasins during our early Colonial period. I don't know who adapted it to dressier styles first.

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: David G. Pihl :
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dpihl

Super Member
How could I have been so stupid???

Don't know what I was thinking guys. G.H. Bass may have introduced "Weejuns" in 1936, but they were clearly based upon something Mr. Bass had seen in Norway. Yes, yes, I knew the name derived from "Norwegian", but had overlooked that fact because I was thinking Bass made the originals. He obviously invented the "Weejun" name, or was the first to protect it as a trade name and a service mark in the US.

It's sort of like the BB OCBD. Based on prior art, but "genuine" in the sense that Brooks Brothers was the first to brand it a polo collar and mass market it. Weejuns are "genuine" in one sense, but they were probably based upon a Norwegian style of shoe.

I feel so stupid!

BTW. On the subject of ghillie brogues:


I was told the openings were for marching through marshes and bogs. The broguing allowed the water to slosh through the uppers and you could keep on marching-- wet wool socks and all!

It's not enough that they expect us to button down our collar flaps in response to the wind and turbulence out in the board room. Now they want us to cuff up our trousers, and march through piles of brown, steaming mud without stopping to change socks and clean out our shoes!

I think they'd better adjust my medication.
 
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