manners Annoying Grammar

Chouan

Honors Member
I would suggest that there actually is "one" dictionary, the OED, which is the definitive dictionary of the English language.
Please note that I have connection with the OED!
 

dks202

Super Member
New words

There are a couple of things that bother me.


spelling a lot as alot, or even worse using spellcheck to get allot

writing "There are a couple things that bother me" (instead of couple of)

I remember reading a letter of accomodation rather than commendation. He used spellcheck too....


I just remembered another one saying supposably instead of supposedly
 

Earl of Ormonde

Connoisseur
As a linguist, previously an English teacher, and now a translator and publishing editor my top 5 pet hates in grammar are these:

1. People, who instead of adding the verb have (could have) or its abbreviated form 've (should've) to the modal verbs, write: could of, should of, must of, would of, had of etc.

2. People who never use possessive pronouns, who write: there instead of their and you're instead of your and it's instead of its.

3. People, and there are millions of them, who constantly refuse to learn, or to accept when told, that "done" is not the past imperfect of "do" e.g. I done it yesterday ....:crazy: Both of my brothers use that form.

4. unnecessary apostrophes in a) nouns and b) possessive pronouns (connected to No. 2 above)

a) the sign outside the place I bought my first car read: car's for sale...:crazy:
b) My last car was great, it's engine was really powerful.....:crazy:
This book is your's not mine.....:crazy:


5. People who omit the definite article where it's required and add it where it isn't.
 

roman totale XVII

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I was once outside a UK supermarket where a member of staff had stuck a sign on a child's ride which read, "This ride only excepts 10p pieces". Of course, giving the opposite meaning to that intended.

I tried to point it out to a nearby worker, but to no avail...

Not that I let these things bother me...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwx8QOgYfsE

:icon_smile_big:
 

El_Abogado

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Actually irregardless IS a word, although considered to be nonstandard. According to Merriam-Webster it is an adverb that is in wide use in verbal communication, less so in written.

Cruiser

Cruiser, you mean "oral communication", as "verbal communication" includes the spoken and the written word.. . .

That's my annoying grammar thing.
 

Pleasant McIvor

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Since "irregardless" raised its ugly head again in this thread, I thought I'd paste the OED's definition, which identifies the humor inherent in any use of this word by an educated person. At the same time it absolves its fellow countrymen from all blame for such vulgarity:

Chiefly N. Amer.
In non-standard or humorous use: regardless.
 

Cruiser

Connoisseur
Cruiser, you mean "oral communication", as "verbal communication" includes the spoken and the written word.. . . .

No, I meant to use the word I used. While I agree that many, if not most, dictionary definitions of "verbal" mean either written or oral, colloquially most folks mean oral in everyday use. Besides, you knew exactly what I meant; therefore, the correct message got through and that is the goal of communication. :icon_smile_big:

Cruiser
 

Garnett

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
My current chart topper is the pseudo-formal reflexive pronoun in sentences where there is no reflection in the verb:

"Sir, I'm the manager here. If you have a complaint about your Big Mac you can direct it to myself"
 

Relayer

Super Member
My current chart topper is the pseudo-formal reflexive pronoun in sentences where there is no reflection in the verb:

"Sir, I'm the manager here. If you have a complaint about your Big Mac you can direct it to myself"

The very same issue (misuse of reflexive pronoun) that I posted in this thread back in Nov 2008.

Good call! :)
 

Garnett

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
The very same issue (misuse of reflexive pronoun) that I posted in this thread back in Nov 2008.

Good call! :)
Heh heh heh. I thought when I posted that I should probably read the whole thread through first! Glad someone else somewhere in the world grinds their teeth at the same thing I do!
 

LordSmoke

Super Member
I would suggest that there actually is "one" dictionary, the OED, which is the definitive dictionary of the English language.
Please note that I have connection with the OED!

:teacha: Indeed, and I highly recommend the following for anyone with a modicum of interest:
 
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