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Howard

Connoisseur
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Charles Dana

Honors Member
Decent colors, Howard.

The white one, though, would be too difficult to coordinate with most shirts—ties look best when they are darker than the shirt. And the red isn’t necessary if you also have the burgundy.

So I suggest you consider all but the white and the red one. Of course, it’s your call.
 

drpeter

Super Member
It’s easy to find neckties—still in good condition—in thrift stores.
Goodwill has a flat rate of $1.99 for all ties, and for other accessories like belts. So, experimenting with colours, patterns and textures isn't an expensive proposition. I have picked up Lauren, Brooks and Scottish and English ties at this price, and a surprising number of them are in mint condition and often with tags that tell you what the original price was.
 

drpeter

Super Member
My opinion is that you should wear a tie-it-yourself tie. But that’s only my opinion.

Having said that:

If you are dead-set against tying a tie, then go with a zipper tie; at least that contraption—because it does have a part that encircles your neck—comes closer to simulating a “real” tie than a clip-on does.
Tying a tie isn't that hard, unless you have an injury or handicap in one or both hands/arms that prevent you from doing so. (The conservative senator and one-time presidential candidate, Robert Dole, had a WWII injury that prevented him the full use of one hand, and he used to wear pre-tied models). A bowtie is also not that difficult if you realize that it is the same principle as tying your shoelaces.

I recently found a couple of bowties at a thrift shop that looked like they were factory-pretied (shaped like a bowtie but pre-set and almost glued into place), but something made me pull on one of the ends and it began to come out. I bought it, took it home and undid it, and it turned out to be a regular self-tie model! The knot was stitched together inside with a single thread to hold it in place. I removed this thread, steamed out the set-in wrinkles, and it became a regular bowtie.

The small pleasures of thrifting.
 

drpeter

Super Member
I agree TK- there are professions where either bow ties or clip on's are necessary. My grandfather was a printer, as was his son and grandson. My uncle nearly died getting his tie caught in a printing press one time. I have photos of my grandfather in the 1930's wearing a suit to work as a printer at a newspaper. He always had his tie tucked into his shirt for this very reason. I never saw him wear a bow tie nor clip on(dont think they had clip on's back then) but he was always careful.
I am with TKI and Fisher. I love bowties. In addition to printers, another group would be pediatricians -- a four-in-hand would be risky because a child could grab it and pull! So they often wear bowties too. At least this is the explanation one pediatrician friend offered me.
 

Charles Dana

Honors Member
Tying a tie isn't that hard, unless you have an injury or handicap in one or both hands/arms that prevent you from doing so. (The conservative senator and one-time presidential candidate, Robert Dole, had a WWII injury that prevented him the full use of one hand, and he used to wear pre-tied models). A bowtie is also not that difficult if you realize that it is the same principle as tying your shoelaces.
I agree with you 100%. However, Howard is adamantly opposed to wearing tie-it-yourself ties.

In suggesting he move forward with zipper ties, I was being realistic.

You know the adage: You have to play the four-in-hand you’ve been dealt.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Tying a tie isn't that hard, unless you have an injury or handicap in one or both hands/arms that prevent you from doing so. (The conservative senator and one-time presidential candidate, Robert Dole, had a WWII injury that prevented him the full use of one hand, and he used to wear pre-tied models). A bowtie is also not that difficult if you realize that it is the same principle as tying your shoelaces.

I recently found a couple of bowties at a thrift shop that looked like they were factory-pretied (shaped like a bowtie but pre-set and almost glued into place), but something made me pull on one of the ends and it began to come out. I bought it, took it home and undid it, and it turned out to be a regular self-tie model! The knot was stitched together inside with a single thread to hold it in place. I removed this thread, steamed out the set-in wrinkles, and it became a regular bowtie.

The small pleasures of thrifting.
"A bowtie is also not that difficult if you realize that it is the same principle as tying your shoelaces."

Yup.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
"A bowtie is also not that difficult if you realize that it is the same principle as tying your shoelaces."

Yup.

Truth be known, I can tie a regular necktie with my hands (and the tie) behind my back, but I do struggle a bit with the bow ties....I can tie the bow; however giving the bow a balanced/finished/elegant look frequently eludes me! :crazy:;)
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Truth be known, I can tie a regular necktie with my hands (and the tie) behind my back, but I do struggle a bit with the bow ties....I can tie the bow; however giving the bow a balanced/finished/elegant look frequently eludes me! :crazy:;)

There was a time when I was going to black tie weddings and charity events with some regularity and I got pretty darn good at tying a bowtie. Only God knows how I'd do now many years later.
 

drpeter

Super Member
however giving the bow a balanced/finished/elegant look frequently eludes me!
Now that's the whole point, old chap! It does not need to be too balanced or finished. Here are my thoughts: Let one end protrude more to one side than the loop that is behind. Pop up the looped end in front so that it looks pushed out a bit. Let the whole thing look a bit like it is almost loosely assembled. In fact, my belief is that some asymmetry is actually more elegant than perfect symmetry. Two examples (plus the late great actor Philippe Noiret):

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Zim

Starting Member
I hope this question qualifies for this thread. I'm looking for a non blue tie to wear with a navy hopsack blazer, grey chinos or khakis, and j press pinpoint blue striped button down. Would a tie like this be perceived as a solid at a distance, or as a small pattern that would be a no go with bengal stripes?

My current plan b is a burgundy and navy tie with very thick, spaced out stripes, also below. I thought the gingham would be more summery.

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I might also try making do with something I have. I can take some pictures. I like striped shirts but find matching them difficult.
 
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Vecchio Vespa

(aka TKI67)
I agree the gingham looks more summery. So what if it looks solid at distance? It would also work, maybe even better, with a blue and white stripe. If you are in the market a solid color and white stripe is a pretty classic summery pairing with a blazer. Bonus points for finding a stripe that uses the colors of something with which you are or were affiliated (school, military, etc.). I wear a bright red and white bowtie, my high school colors.
 
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Zim

Starting Member
I'm sorry, I misspoke. I actually hope it resolves as solid because I feared if it didn't I thought it would be busy with the striped shirt. 😅

Hmm...I'd like to find something in my school colors someday. They're green and white.
 

Vecchio Vespa

(aka TKI67)
I'm sorry, I misspoke. I actually hope it resolves as solid because I feared if it didn't I thought it would be busy with the striped shirt. 😅

Hmm...I'd like to find something in my school colors someday. They're green and white.
I note you are in Oregon. As a Willamette Alumnus I also wear cardinal and old gold stripes, but that is not a very summery look.
 

IrvingS

Starting Member
Hi, I have a vintage (pre 1972 going by store label) Alan Paine Sweater that says "Cashmere Major". It feels very weighty for a cashmere sweater. Is this an older indication of a heavy cashmere weight, a majority cashmere blended with wool, or a size indicator?

Thanks!!!

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Vecchio Vespa

(aka TKI67)
Hi, I have a vintage (pre 1972 going by store label) Alan Paine Sweater that says "Cashmere Major". It feels very weighty for a cashmere sweater. Is this an older indication of a heavy cashmere weight, a majority cashmere blended with wool, or a size indicator?

Thanks!!!

View attachment 62731
Welcome to Ask Andy!

Your Robert Kirk label is a happy trip down memory lane, but I cannot answer your question. I just wanted to say hi. Cashmere is graded by coarseness, and I speculated that in the era this was made they might have assigned names to grades rather than letters. With that brand and that store I would guess it is a very fine sweater.
 

Charles Dana

Honors Member
Hi, I have a vintage (pre 1972 going by store label) Alan Paine Sweater that says "Cashmere Major". It feels very weighty for a cashmere sweater. Is this an older indication of a heavy cashmere weight, a majority cashmere blended with wool, or a size indicator?

Thanks!!!

View attachment 62731
I couldn’t find much about the term “Cashmere Major.” It originally seems to have been a brand name apart from Alan Paine. In 1952, men’s clothiers were offering “Cashmere Major” v-neck pullover sweaters with a fabric content of 50% cashmere and 50% wool. In 1956, “Cashmere Major” sweaters were advertised as being made of 55% cashmere and 45% wool. The ads didn’t indicate if those sweaters were associated with Alan Paine.

Were they two unrelated companies, and then Alan Paine bought Cashmere Major? Or was Cashmere Major always a division of Alan Paine? I haven’t been able to determine that yet.

In any case, it appears as though “Cashmere Major” was nothing more than an arbitrary brand name; it wasn’t intended to imply anything about the quality or weight of the garment that the label was attached to.
 

Charles Dana

Honors Member
With that brand and that store I would guess it is a very fine sweater.
Yes.

Robert Kirk Ltd. still exists, sort of. It’s DNA has been absorbed into the current Cable Car Clothiers.

Robert Kirk did sell and Cable Car Clothiers does sell high-quality merchandise. CCC is really pricey, though. I walk past that store several times a week. Did so yesterday, in fact. I’m always tempted to go in and browse, but my wallet says, “You stay the hell out of there!”

“Well OK!”

Weird that I regularly find myself 4 feet from Cable Car’s front door, but I get my trad garments from O’Connell’s, thousands of miles away.
 
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