BB made-to-measure?

Califax

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
So, what exactly is the status of this? I understand they no longer own the shirt factory (S. Carolina?) - but a salesperson told my wife that they may start up m-t-m again? Anyone have any info?
 

Steve Smith

Super Member
I think that the Garland, NC shirt factory is in the process of being sold now but I'm not sure what the new buyer will manufacture there. If the OP means that the MTM shirts will come from that factory...I doubt it.
 

Califax

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I think that the Garland, NC shirt factory is in the process of being sold now but I'm not sure what the new buyer will manufacture there. If the OP means that the MTM shirts will come from that factory...I doubt it.

Many thanks! I suppose what I really to know is: whether BB will resume their m-t-m shirts?
 

TKI67

Elite Member
And now I shall really blow your mind: did BB ever truly exist?
Yes, it did. It had thick carpeting, dark paneled walls and cases for it wares, and oh so reliable stockage. All the standard cuts, colors, and fabrics were always there, and the changing years and seasons brought alternatives with minor differences, like Shetlands or cords in a new color that was for that year only and displaced nothing. On the tailored floor they would similarly add a suit with a new stripe, a POW plaid in a new shade of grey, and a couple of new tweeds to augment the staple herringbones and glen plaids. Otherwise nothing ever changed. Then in the eighties they moved into malls and used the same metal and glass modular displays as Macy's, changed their timeless labels, abandoned Makers 3/2 sack suits, and started changing other things at an alarming rate. The last straw was when they started replacing the staff who were like family to me. Yes, it really did exist.
 

vonSuess

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
It looks to me like their purpose has become but to fill spaces in shopping malls where they will offer but shopping mall quality clothing. Not exactly existing to serve any purpose that interests me...
 

drpeter

Super Member
I agree with TKI. In the early eighties, I went into Brooks Brothers in Chicago (I think on Michigan Avenue), and the atmosphere and decor was exactly as he describes above. It was restrained, sophisticated in a quiet way, and filled with quality clothing and accessories. The next time I went into a BB shop was in Boston in 2014. There was nothing in that store that reminded me of the one I saw in Chicago and I had a conversation with one of the salesmen about it. His response, to paraphrase it: Times have changed.
 

TKI67

Elite Member
I agree with TKI. In the early eighties, I went into Brooks Brothers in Chicago (I think on Michigan Avenue), and the atmosphere and decor was exactly as he describes above. It was restrained, sophisticated in a quiet way, and filled with quality clothing and accessories. The next time I went into a BB shop was in Boston in 2014. There was nothing in that store that reminded me of the one I saw in Chicago and I had a conversation with one of the salesmen about it. His response, to paraphrase it: Times have changed.
Times have indeed changed, but the salesman's glib response fails to acknowledge an important truth. For ages Brooks was evolving. They gently pushed the evolution of traditional clothing, but along the way they hung onto values that had served them and their customers so well. They used American manufacturing extensively and made high quality products that were very comfortable and represented good value. From such a platform the careful introduction of seersucker, madras, colored OCBDs, and more was a strategy to cement allegiance with the young and retain the allegiance of older and old. Since the mid-1980s they have hastily jettisoned the things that retained allegiance and gone so far afield that it is a wonder that they aren't in Chapter 7.

Times do change, but stores like LL Bean, J. Crew, Land's End, Orvis, Filson, Patagonia, and even Old Navy and Target know how to keep existing customers coming back, even if they grumble. Brooks, like A & F, changed so radically that they are, but for the value of their name, a brand new (and pretty whack) entrant into menswear.

So yeah, times change. However, when a store thinks it needs to make time fly much faster, they take on a huge risk.
 
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