drpeter

Super Member
LOL. Your pints are well made and the jingle you reference is memorable, for sure...it makes the point(s) and tickles the listener's funny bone, all at the same time. ;)
I'm delighted that you love it. I sent it to all my (Boston) Irish relatives -- my sister-in-law and her brothers, and other family members. They enjoyed it too.

Some of the Indian place names are either made-up or misspelt or both, but that's OK. It's the song that counts. Really funny lines too, for instance:

I dreamed I got a letter from me darling Josephine
She asked me would I marry her, back home in Skibbereen
But the girls out here have almond eyes and jasmine-scented hair
And there's things in the Kama Sutra that they never do in Clare!
 

drpeter

Super Member
The proper way to do fish and chips is as takeout, wrapped in News of the World, LOL.

Sarge, is it permissible to put a little Carolina Reaper hot sauce on the haggis? I might be persuaded to try it...
 

Tweedlover

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I think the English do a marvelous job of fish and chips and of roasting a whole chicken and, going north, I rather like haggis, too.
Being of Scottish descent, I've tried to talk myself into actually liking haggis. But, after eating it maybe a half a dozen times, the best I can do is tolerate it. At least I'm not trying to like Norwegian cuisine being also of that descent as lutefisk would kill me. :D
 

Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
The proper way to do fish and chips is as takeout, wrapped in News of the World, LOL.

Sarge, is it permissible to put a little Carolina Reaper hot sauce on the haggis? I might be persuaded to try it...
Well, HP Sauce is traditional but I figure as far as hot sauces go, do what you like. I'm sure aioli or Coleman's mustard would be good and horseradish would be wonderful.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Just a thought.. As I understand it Haggis is banned from importation into the US of A because it contains the sheep's stomach acids and it's phlegm and according to the FDA it can make the consumer very sick and can possibly kill you. Lutefish on the other hand, while it may taste like jellied fish fat, with a healthy dose of ammonia in the mix, may cause the bile to rise in one's throat, but unless you failed to properly flush the lye out of it, lutefish will not kill you Now get out there and enjoy your lunch! LOL. ;)
 

Tweedlover

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Just a thought.. As I understand it Haggis is banned from importation into the US of A because it contains the sheep's stomach acids and it's phlegm and according to the FDA it can make the consumer very sick and can possibly kill you. Lutefish on the other hand, while it may taste like jellied fish fat, with a healthy dose of ammonia in the mix, may cause the bile to rise in one's throat, but unless you failed to properly flush the lye out of it, lutefish will not kill you Now get out there and enjoy your lunch! LOL. ;)
True that traditionally made Scottish haggis is banned from importation for that reason. All the haggis I've tried has been made in the US.
 

Tweedlover

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
ypu, same with me
Whenever there was a Scottish Games in the vicinity, I would always head for the haggis stand first and then grab a brown ale. Once fortified, I could happily watch the giants throw telephone poles and heave boulders over bars.
I, too,tried haggis for the first time off a haggis food truck @ a Scottish festival.
 

drpeter

Super Member
I had a Norwegian friend who couldn't understand how his father could eat the stuff. Being Lutheran, I have been occasionally subjected to lutefisk. It was so terrible I tried to make bacalao because I figured it had to be better. It was only less bad, and not much less.
Wisconsin is awash in lutefisk. It's fish preserved in lye, as Eagle said.There are jokes about it. Here's one:

A little girl in Sunday school was asked by her teacher to recite the books of the Old Testament. She started with Genesis, Exodus, Lutefisk...

I have been reading about Basque food (Charles Cumming's spy novel The Spanish Game is set in Spain and is about Basques in part) and I recently picked up a cookbook of Basque cuisine. Bacalao is featured there, and it does not look too bad -- I have never had it though. I have had Ecuadorian fanesca, which is a Lent staple there, and that is good. These are all salt cod dishes.

My advice is to add a decent dash of a good hot sauce to these dishes to "kick it up a notch", as Emeril might say! It also has the advantage of neutralising all those things that might kill you otherwise, LOL. At least, that's my belief.

Recommended: Endorphin Rush, Melinda's Ghost Pepper (Naga Jholokia) Sauce, Dave's Sudden Death, Trinidad Scorpion, Carolina Reaper, and yes, Sarge's B'wana Walt. Sriracha and Moroccan Harissa are good too. Hey, it's like putting a tiger in your tank, LOL.
 
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David J. Cooper

Super Member
Bacalao when done right is delicious. We were in Vittoria Gasttiez a couple of years ago and really enjoyed it as a spread and as a fritter.

Basque cuisine is delicious, sadly my experience with the language led to a few unpleasant experiences while in the Rioja.
 

drpeter

Super Member
I have heard that Basque food is splendid. I am a pretty decent chef and make a variety of dishes from East and West. So I will try to make one of the dishes in my newfound Basque cookbook.

I have sampled Catalan food, though in the States. I have made a veal ternera in the Catalan style, which is simple and just delicious! Spain and Portugal both have great food, and Portugal, because of her former colonies in India, like Goa, Daman and Diu, has many dishes that have Indian ingredients in them. I have eaten Portuguese dishes in Amsterdam, at one of the restaurants run by a Portuguese chef. Outstanding.
 

Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
Across the rural West, Basque restaurants are rather common. No surprise, given the number of Basques who emigrated to care for sheep out this way. Anyway, the food is delightful and the practice of serving family style is even more so. There's one in Carson City, NV which is a 'must' when you get up that way. Actually there are several but my favorite is Louis' Basque Corner. Bring an appetite!
 
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