British country clothing (photos)...

anglophile

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Could you elaborate on the laws requiring that you wear orange clothing? It seems very strange and completely unnecessary for things like driven shoots.

Would a pink shirt and yellow tie (like the gentleman pictured above is wearing) be bright enough to alert other people around him?

I cannot vouch for laws elsewhere but when hunting in Ontario, Provincial law requires that all members of a hunting party each show no less than 100 square inces of blaze orange. It must be visible at all times, so no 10x10 patch on your back only.

Bright colours do not pass, it must be Blaze orange.

I agree that when hunting a drive or such it would be unneccesary, but them's the breaks sometimes.
 

Doctor Damage

Connoisseur
Driven shoots are not common in Canada, if they even exist at all. Most hunters are a bunch of drunk rednecks trespassing on private property and shooting guns off at anything that moves (okay, that was a blatant cheap shot, but not too far off the mark, no pun intended). Some have argued in the past that the blaze orange markers actually give unskilled shooters something to aim at. Anyway, Europeans, and especially Continentals, seem to take these things a lot more seriously, at least from what I've read.

I should note that I don't shoot, nor do I own a gun anymore. I should have kept my grandfather's old side-by-side, which he re-stocked himself (excellent craftsman), but you can't buy shells anymore without signing away your first born to the government, so there wasn't much point.

DD
 

Doctor Damage

Connoisseur
More photos from yet another shoot or perhaps a skeet competiton. Lots of tweed coats this time (with the inevitable Gore-Tex drop liners...).
 
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anglophile

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Looks like a skeet/trap/clays shoot to me. What with the prevalence of over-unders as opposed to side-by-sides, trap shed in the background, guy with a score book and the lack of wellies/breeks.

Is that George Carlin in the 3rd pic?
 

anglophile

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Driven shoots are not common in Canada.

DD

Not exactly true, at least around here, but they do have one major difference. In SW Ontario, upland fowl are not driven but most of the deer hunters I know use a drive for larger game. A row of guns is laid out along a treeline of in enfilade of a known deer run. Beaters will then work their way through the bush driving the deer in the direction of the guns. Same principle as a driven bird shoot, slightly different objective.
 

Doctor Damage

Connoisseur
For those with deep pockets, Orvis has put their Musto Highlands jackets on sale , marked down to $475. Although I don't like the "new" colours of the Highlands jacket, it's apparently a top tier product and preferred by lots of Brits. I'd buy one in a snap if I had the money and could justify another seasonal coat. Perhaps the best feature is the extra-high collar, descended from Musto's sailing jackets, although I also like the fold-down flap for sitting on wet.



Damn, I wish I could afford one...

DD
 

septa

Senior Member
A very un-pc English friend of mine has a term for what DukeGrad mentioned. Apparently it is very common to hit the beaters on driven shoots. Usually it leaves the beater a bit bruised, the term my friend used for this was "bagging a beater". He's in a Guards Regiment also, presumably not the one from these pictures.
 

Clovis

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
A very un-pc English friend of mine has a term for what DukeGrad mentioned. Apparently it is very common to hit the beaters on driven shoots. Usually it leaves the beater a bit bruised, the term my friend used for this was "bagging a beater". He's in a Guards Regiment also, presumably not the one from these pictures.

In the USA its known as a full or half-cheney depending on the numbers of barrels you let.
 

Doctor Damage

Connoisseur
Below I have scanned an article on British country clothing that appeared in the December 1994 issue of The Field magazine. This is an excellent guide to how they think about functional country clothing.






DocD
 

Sir Royston

Spammer
More photos from yet another shoot or perhaps a skeet competiton. Lots of tweed coats this time (with the inevitable Gore-Tex drop liners...).
Thought I would add the following..
Regards
RBH
DSCF1301.jpg

DSCF1302.jpg
 

Beresford

Super Member
Below I have scanned an article on British country clothing that appeared in the December 1994 issue of The Field magazine. This is an excellent guide to how they think about functional country clothing.

DocD

Reminds me of a great article on stag hunting in Scotland which appeared in the early 90s in the late great deceased and departed "M" magazine.
 

Sir Royston

Spammer
Do you get very high birds over your back garden fence, your Lordship? Looks like a sporting peg. Nice suit. But about that shotgun...

With tongue firmly in cheek,

Scott

Not actually trying to kill anything for the photo!!.. and yes, that gun.. not the most useful of items really!
 

Doctor Damage

Connoisseur
DougNZ said:
DD, I'm having trouble downloading the last two pages of your article. Can you help?
The pages seemt to be working fine. They are large files, so wait for them to load. If it somes up with the little "X" thing, then just right-click on it and select "show picture". That usually re-loads the image.

DocD
 
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