Can you press/iron seersucker?

ymc226

New Member
I am interested in getting a seersucker sports coat like the one at J Press in solid navy like the one on the above link.

I don’t dry clean often and use a Jiffy steamer and steam press to keep my sports coat and pants pressed. Can I do the same with seersucker fabric or will pressing them at high temperatures change the character of the fabric too much?
 
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derum

Inactive
I am interested in getting a seersucker sports coat like the one at J Press in solid navy like the one on the above link.

I don’t dry clean often and use a Jiffy steamer and steam press to keep my sports coat and pants pressed. Can I do the same with seersucker fabric or will pressing them at high temperatures change the character of the fabric too much?
Not everyone thinks they should be ironed:
"As for the wrinkling, that is another superior quality of seersucker: don't bother to iron or press it, because you can't unwrinkle it. So the seersucker suit on the lawyer walking down Broughton Street after a shave and a trim at Jimmy Tagaglio's looked just like the seersucker suit on the drunk just let out of the holding pen."
 

ymc226

New Member
Not everyone thinks they should be ironed:
"As for the wrinkling, that is another superior quality of seersucker: don't bother to iron or press it, because you can't unwrinkle it. So the seersucker suit on the lawyer walking down Broughton Street after a shave and a trim at Jimmy Tagaglio's looked just like the seersucker suit on the drunk just let out of the holding pen."

Thank you. Actually, I like the “crinkles” of the seersucker fabric and specifically want to preserve that characteristic but want to eliminate the invariable larger folds or wrinkles that come from wearing.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
The crinkle of seersucker is woven in. Originally I've read it was created via an acid treatment, but that's history.

As such, you can press away, and unless you overheat or otherwise damage the cloth, you shouldn't experience much difficulty. I'd use a medium temperature. I think a steamer would be more useful on jackets, ironing on the trousers.

It shouldn't affect the crinkle materially, but realize the nature of seersucker is rumpled. So understand that no matter how much you iron or steam, it will return to that natural state after any short wearing on a steamy day.
 

fishertw

Elite Member
Not everyone thinks they should be ironed:
"As for the wrinkling, that is another superior quality of seersucker: don't bother to iron or press it, because you can't unwrinkle it. So the seersucker suit on the lawyer walking down Broughton Street after a shave and a trim at Jimmy Tagaglio's looked just like the seersucker suit on the drunk just let out of the holding pen."
And the drunk and the lawyer COULD be the same person.
 

Titus_A

Super Member
I have both ironed and pressed seersucker, but I can't recall ever having done either with a seersucker jacket. I've ironed seersucker shirts and dresses that got badly rumpled in the laundry,* and perhaps I've steamed creases out of the crotch of a pair of trousers (I spend a lot of time sitting), but I am confident I have never done beans to one of my seersucker jackets.

So the short answer is "yes," you can do that to the fabric without irreparably damaging it. But unless you wad your jacket up and leave it under a pile of clothes, I doubt you would put enough rumples in a seersucker jacket to warrant doing anything to it. It's supposed to have a bit of an insouciant quality.

* I grew up in a big family ironing my own school shirts, while my wife grew up an only child whose mother did all the ironing; the net result is I am the only person in the house who knows how to use the dang thing. I think not learning to iron is one of the things my wife puts under the heading of "I was keeping your children alive instead." I've always suspected that both should be possible simultaneously, but she does a sufficiently bad job when she attempts it that I tend not to press (pun intended) the issue.
 
G

Guest-48821

Guest
Thank you. Actually, I like the “crinkles” of the seersucker fabric and specifically want to preserve that characteristic but want to eliminate the invariable larger folds or wrinkles that come from wearing.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
I have both ironed and pressed seersucker, but I can't recall ever having done either with a seersucker jacket. I've ironed seersucker shirts and dresses that got badly rumpled in the laundry,* and perhaps I've steamed creases out of the crotch of a pair of trousers (I spend a lot of time sitting), but I am confident I have never done beans to one of my seersucker jackets.

So the short answer is "yes," you can do that to the fabric without irreparably damaging it. But unless you wad your jacket up and leave it under a pile of clothes, I doubt you would put enough rumples in a seersucker jacket to warrant doing anything to it. It's supposed to have a bit of an insouciant quality.

* I grew up in a big family ironing my own school shirts, while my wife grew up an only child whose mother did all the ironing; the net result is I am the only person in the house who knows how to use the dang thing. I think not learning to iron is one of the things my wife puts under the heading of "I was keeping your children alive instead." I've always suspected that both should be possible simultaneously, but she does a sufficiently bad job when she attempts it that I tend not to press (pun intended) the issue.

"I think not learning to iron is one of the things my wife puts under the heading of "I was keeping your children alive instead."

LOL, I have a feeling you married very well.

(And, yes, I know your post is 2 years old.)
 
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