Clothing Illustrations From or Inspired by the 20s to the 60s

Flanderian

Connoisseur
The casual side of Trad -


brooksbrothers1945b-1.jpg
 

drpeter

Super Member
Figures 616 and 608 look identical, except for the darker shading in the latter. Likewise, Figure 609 is identical to the the one to its right (the Fig number is cut off, maybe 610?), except for differences in shading and the presence or absence of stripes. I wonder why.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator

From the examples on the illustration above, it would appear that the skin tight continental fit that appeals to so many and yet confuses and confounds the rest of us , is really nothing new, but rather a more vintage fashion that came, went and has raised it's disturbing head a subsequent time! Clothes that fit properly are comfortable. The examples in that illustration do not appear to be so. Sorry. ;)
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
From the examples on the illustration above, it would appear that the skin tight continental fit that appeals to so many and yet confuses and confounds the rest of us , is really nothing new, but rather a more vintage fashion that came, went and has raised it's disturbing head a subsequent time! Clothes that fit properly are comfortable. The examples in that illustration do not appear to be so. Sorry. ;)

From illustrations like this, dated 1922 (lower center and left), I've seen that the 1920s definitely fitted men's suits, etc., more like today with the pants cut shorter as well. But it did keep sport coat and suit jacket lengths to more traditional measures.

I had always thought the reason was the "suit-tie-shirt" construct as we know it was only coming into being in the 1920s and they hadn't yet gotten the fit right, which they would do, overall, in the 1930s.

But as we've seen, not only today, but off and on from the '30s on, they've played around with the proportions and fit a lot, sometimes exaggerating the looseness and sometimes, like today, making them very tight. That said, with the entire construct losing support, I wonder if there will be a return to a more traditional balance or if the suit-tie-shirt construct will just, sadly, fade away.


Figures 616 and 608 look identical, except for the darker shading in the latter. Likewise, Figure 609 is identical to the the one to its right (the Fig number is cut off, maybe 610?), except for differences in shading and the presence or absence of stripes. I wonder why.

This appears to be some sort of "insider" to the fashion world sketch page. Maybe the answer to your question lies in what it was used for as you are clearly correct that the illustrations are repeated, but slightly altered.
 
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drpeter

Super Member
From the examples on the illustration above, it would appear that the skin tight continental fit that appeals to so many and yet confuses and confounds the rest of us , is really nothing new, but rather a more vintage fashion that came, went and has raised it's disturbing head a subsequent time! Clothes that fit properly are comfortable. The examples in that illustration do not appear to be so. Sorry. ;)
You're bang on target! Styles and fashions are cyclical. When I was a teenager in the sixties, we were all wearing drainpipe trousers, and this astounded our fathers because they were used to the looser, pleated trousers of the forties and fifties. But it did not astound people of an earlier generation who were familiar with tight, flat-front trousers. They belonged to the Edwardian generation, as they were called in that country across the pond. So it goes.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Far be it for me to step on Brooks' ad text, but you're right. Could be an instance of chicken or the egg, as I haven't any into on the relative chronology of each ad.
Brooks Brothers' No 1 Sack Suit, dating back to the 1890s, was essentially borrowed from the English styles of the day: Three buttons, natural shoulders, and so forth. We think of it now as American, of course, but like the BB button-down shirt, it had its origins in England.

Cross-national influences in clothes and styles are always interesting topics. In his various essays, Bruce Boyer has considered these topics. The origins of various articles of clothing and their design tell us about cultures and their influence. When we think about it, the suit, in its many forms and variations, has now spread around the world. Its regional adaptations in cultures as different and far-flung as India, China and Japan are nothing short of amazing.
 
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Flanderian

Connoisseur
From the examples on the illustration above, it would appear that the skin tight continental fit that appeals to so many and yet confuses and confounds the rest of us , is really nothing new, but rather a more vintage fashion that came, went and has raised it's disturbing head a subsequent time! Clothes that fit properly are comfortable. The examples in that illustration do not appear to be so. Sorry. ;)
From illustrations like this, dated 1922 (lower center and left), I've seen that the 1920s definitely fitted men's suits, etc., more like today with the pants cut shorter as well. But it did keep sport coat and suit jacket lengths to more traditional measures.

I had always thought the reason was the "suit-tie-shirt" construct as we know it was only coming into being in the 1920s and they hadn't yet gotten the fit right, which they would do, overall, in the 1930s.

But as we've seen, not only today, but off and on from the '30s on, they've played around with the proportions and fit a lot, sometimes exaggerating the looseness and sometimes, like today, making them very tight. That said, with the entire construct losing support, I wonder if there will be a return to a more traditional balance or if the suit-tie-shirt construct will just, sadly, fade away.




This appears to be some sort of "insider" to the fashion world sketch page. Maybe the answer to your question lies in what it was used for as you are clearly correct that the illustrations are repeated, but slightly altered.
You're bang on target! Styles and fashions are cyclical. When I was a teenager in the sixties, we were all wearing drainpipe trousers, and this astounded our fathers because they were used to the looser, pleated trousers of the forties and fifties. But it did not astound people of an earlier generation who were familiar with tight, flat-front trousers. They belonged to the Edwardian generation, as they were called in that country across the pond. So it goes.

This is a splendid fashion illustration from the '20's. 👍

But the both thinness of the figures, and snugness of the fit are a bit exaggerated. Though certainly the typical tailored clothing of the '20's fit more closely than the drape jacket, and Oxford Bag inspired trousers of the the '30's that followed.

"Gentleman" Jimmy Walker, Mayor of NYC, considered a very stylish man of the era is shown below wearing a more typical '20's cut and fit.


JimmyWalker.jpg
 
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drpeter

Super Member
I wish Gentleman Jim's trousers were visible in this photograph. Here is an illustration of Edwardian clothes, from the early 1900s. Not quite the drainpipe trousers of the sixties, but fairly tight and tapered legs. Also the frock coat is still clearly the style in jackets, four buttons being the norm.

1627324181632.png
 
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