Fading Fast

Connoisseur
I stumbled across this illustration - a Coke ad from 1957 - and thought it would be neat to attempt to get a thread going on illustrations of Ivy clothes (kinda like what Flanderian is doing with Vintage Esquire illustrations over on the other side of the house).

And, if not, this one with its OCBD, ski and V-neck sweaters, khakis, argyle socks and Weejuns is fun just by itself. Also, clearly, Coke wanted to position itself as cool, so this is more evidence that the cool kids of the '50s were dressing in Ivy.

Many years ago, I dated a blonde who said a black turtleneck is a blonde's best friend - no argument from me.

6f0fd2b966bacb86d06ac3d451a37eee.jpg
 
Last edited:

Flanderian

Connoisseur
I stumbled across this illustration - a Coke ad from 1957 - and thought it would be neat to attempt to get a thread going on illustrations of Ivy clothes (kinda like what Flanderian is doing with Vintage Esquire illustrations over on the other side of the house).

And, if not, this one with its OCBD, ski and V-neck sweaters, khakis, argyle socks and Weejuns is fun just by itself. Also, clearly, Coke wanted to position itself as cool, so this is more evidence that the cool kids of the '50s were dressing in Ivy.

Many years ago, I dated a blonde who said a black turtleneck is blonde's best friend - no argument from me.

View attachment 26840
Great illustration!

Thanks!
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Ah, '57. I remember it well, being a god-awful gorgeous 12 year-old and all. But I think there's rum in them thar Cokes. The kneeling guy who's way too close to the fire has spilled a box of little square things. Quaaludes I think.
Proving that you can take the boy out of New Jersey, but not New Jersey out of the boy, when my girlfriend and I go to the racetrack (1st clue New Jersey's still in the boy), we bring along a flask of rum to spike up the Cokes (2nd clue).

Sitting in Grandstand seats at Belmont adding Captain Morgan to track-purchased Cokes is not something to be proud of, but it is very New Jersey.
 

Doctor Damage

Connoisseur
^ That painting reminds me of many such images which appeared in early issues of Playboy illustrating the exciting single playboy lifestyle or something like that. It's amazing how ubiquitous Pan Am was at one point, now only old-timers know the brand.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
^ That painting reminds me of many such images which appeared in early issues of Playboy illustrating the exciting single playboy lifestyle or something like that. It's amazing how ubiquitous Pan Am was at one point, now only old-timers know the brand.
As a little kid in the late '60s, I have a vague memory of somebody in our neighborhood taking an airplane trip - it was still a big deal back then, at least in my not fancy-or-wealthy town - and seeing that little blue Pan Am bag and thinking how cool it was.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
^ That painting reminds me of many such images which appeared in early issues of Playboy illustrating the exciting single playboy lifestyle or something like that. It's amazing how ubiquitous Pan Am was at one point, now only old-timers know the brand.
As a little kid in the late '60s, I have a vague memory of somebody in our neighborhood taking an airplane trip - it was still a big deal back then, at least in my not fancy-or-wealthy town - and seeing that little blue Pan Am bag and thinking how cool it was.
If you've not seen it, you might enjoy Spielberg's "small" 2002 film, Catch Me if You Can with DiCaprio as the young protagonist. Just a well made, solid and entertaining film set in the era. Fine cast and excellent performances throughout, but perhaps most astonishing, it's largely true.

Obviously, I'm a big fan. :oops:







 

rl1856

Senior Member
I stumbled across this illustration - a Coke ad from 1957 - and thought it would be neat to attempt to get a thread going on illustrations of Ivy clothes (kinda like what Flanderian is doing with Vintage Esquire illustrations over on the other side of the house).

And, if not, this one with its OCBD, ski and V-neck sweaters, khakis, argyle socks and Weejuns is fun just by itself. Also, clearly, Coke wanted to position itself as cool, so this is more evidence that the cool kids of the '50s were dressing in Ivy.

Many years ago, I dated a blonde who said a black turtleneck is a blonde's best friend - no argument from me.

View attachment 26840
Inspiration for Don and Betty Draper.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
men-hats-swscan06680.jpg

Love the collar pin, plus the length of the suit jackets - and their button stances - on the men in the background.

Methinks the young, comely lady likes the collar pin as well. Kudos to the artist as he or she captured a look that says she wants something and it's not just his collar pin.

P.S. Can an eyebrow really arch to that extreme?
 

Charles Dana

Honors Member
P.S. Can an eyebrow really arch to that extreme?
Sure, if the cosmetic surgeon got carried away. The eyebrow-halfway-up-the-forehead look is common among female San Francisco socialites past age 50. In fact, the "permanently surprised" look seems to be obligatory at swanky functions such as opening night at the opera and so on.

This reminds me of what comedian Stewart Francis said: "I used to be a cosmetic surgeon. That raised some eyebrows."
 

Mr. B. Scott Robinson

Advanced Member
My uncle flew for Pan Am in the 70s. He was killed in a FANG F-106 crash in '77 so I missed out on all the debauched stories! Great guy, balls of steel, a pilot's pilot.

What I gather from the ads displayed is that good design is timeless. None of these garments would look very much out of place today on a well dressed man or woman.

Cheers,

BSR
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
Good one, love the setting and skyline as much as the clothes. Also, great example of how you can't go wrong matching camel and grey.
Yes, I think the artwork is rather nice. Your thread has started me on a nostalgia binge for the era. I spent part of last evening watching old episodes of Peter Gunn. Note the Chrysler Imperial in the opening scene. It was actually a car of remarkable quality for the era. The language and attitudes of the era and the assumptions underlying them are very different from contemporary society. It was a time before some major social shifts.


As a guy who haunts the Internet, I've stumbled upon a lot. This is from a series, and I think both the art work and style rather nice. Kinda like the grownup side of trad.

upload_2018-12-17_12-1-39.png
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Yes, I think the artwork is rather nice. Your thread has started me on a nostalgia binge for the era. I spent part of last evening watching old episodes of Peter Gunn. Note the Chrysler Imperial in the opening scene. It was actually a car of remarkable quality for the era. The language and attitudes of the era and the assumptions underlying them are very different from contemporary society. It was a time before some major social shifts.


As a guy who haunts the Internet, I've stumbled upon a lot. This is from a series, and I think both the art work and style rather nice. Kinda like the grownup side of trad.

View attachment 26927
Funny, unrelated to this thread, several weeks ago, I, too, started watching some "Peter Gunn" episodes. Growing up in the late '60s/'70s, I hadn't seen the show, almost at all, in reruns, so they're fresh to me.

However, so far, I'm not overwhelmed. Yes, the style is very cool - and I can appreciated how it was super-cool at the time - but the stories are pretty conventional, at least the five or six episodes I've seen so far, and the budget seems to have been about $150 per episode. That said, I want to stay with it a bit more to see if it develops or I see it in a better light.

In the town I grew up in, very few people could afford the fancy cars, but there were a few Cadillacs and Lincolns (the doctor, the bank owner, etc.) and one, yes one, Chrysler Imperial, which was a bit different - chunkier and quirkier, but definitely luxurious. As a kid, I thought it was cool and a lot cooler than our old Ford Galaxy 500.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
Funny, unrelated to this thread, several weeks ago, I, too, started watching some "Peter Gunn" episodes. Growing up in the late '60s/'70s, I hadn't seen the show, almost at all, in reruns, so they're fresh to me.

However, so far, I'm not overwhelmed. Yes, the style is very cool - and I can appreciated how it was super-cool at the time - but the stories are pretty conventional, at least the five or six episodes I've seen so far, and the budget seems to have been about $150 per episode. That said, I want to stay with it a bit more to see if it develops or I see it in a better light.

In the town I grew up in, very few people could afford the fancy cars, but there were a few Cadillacs and Lincolns (the doctor, the bank owner, etc.) and one, yes one, Chrysler Imperial, which was a bit different - chunkier and quirkier, but definitely luxurious. As a kid, I thought it was cool and a lot cooler than our old Ford Galaxy 500.
To call the scripts and production values run of the mill for the genre and era is a kindness. But what it's really about is the cool, the style and the unflappable nature of Stevens' Gunn. (Though I personally always had a warm spot for Bernardi's Jacoby. Was surprised to remember the Character's name after 55 years!)
 
Your email address will not be publicly visible. We will only use it to contact you to confirm your post.

IMPORTANT: BEFORE POSTING PLEASE CHECK THE DATE OF THE LAST POST OF THIS THREAD. IF IT'S VERY OLD, PLEASE CONSIDER REGISTERING FIRST, AND STARTING A NEW THREAD ABOUT THIS TOPIC.