drpeter

Senior Member
You chaps are making me a little sad -- I have to go to a friend's house and camp out if I want to watch this show! And who can do that in the middle of Babylon Pandemic?
 

drpeter

Senior Member
I'm a little puzzled by the image here. Are the college men getting ready to play baseball wearing shirts and ties? The bats look appropriate but the ball seems far too large (or else the fellow holding the ball has very small hands!). And what is the woman doing with the broom and what looks like a sheet of paper cut off at one corner?

I didn't grow up playing baseball (cricket was my game). Hence perhaps my ignorance of the subtleties of baseball and its variations. But I have watched the game on TV and even watched one live in Milwaukee (Brewers vs Braves) ages ago. And I have not seen anything like this. Perhaps it is some sort of college prank.

I did try to read the text, but it's too small for my aging eyes -- and even with a magnifier, I could only get the general drift, which does not clarify anything about the image, other than the virtues of the white shirt.
 

FiscalDean

Super Member
I'm a little puzzled by the image here. Are the college men getting ready to play baseball wearing shirts and ties? The bats look appropriate but the ball seems far too large (or else the fellow holding the ball has very small hands!). And what is the woman doing with the broom and what looks like a sheet of paper cut off at one corner?

I didn't grow up playing baseball (cricket was my game). Hence perhaps my ignorance of the subtleties of baseball and its variations. But I have watched the game on TV and even watched one live in Milwaukee (Brewers vs Braves) ages ago. And I have not seen anything like this. Perhaps it is some sort of college prank.

I did try to read the text, but it's too small for my aging eyes -- and even with a magnifier, I could only get the general drift, which does not clarify anything about the image, other than the virtues of the white shirt.
The size of the ball would suggest they're playing slow pitch softball. The ball used in slow pitch is much larger than the ball used in plain old softball. A normal ball would be 10 -12 inches in diameter while the slow pitch ball can be up to 16" in diameter. The rest of the ad is rather unusual. The lady with the "broom" must be the umpire, how they ever convinced a young lady in a skirt to umpire is beyond me (Is that the definition of easy? and is that why the caption refers to the lucky dogs? ) I'm fairly sure I wouldn't be playing any kind of ball in a white shirt and tie.

I'm with you on the aging eyes comment.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
Thanks very much indeed for the explanation, @FiscalDean . I had no idea there was a variation on softball, the slow pitch kind. I have seen softball played, but never with a larger ball. With a16" diameter, it is almost the size of a football (soccer) or a basketball. That ball could be quite dangerous if hit hard!

Maybe someone here will explain the lady with the broom and paper.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
There is a tradition at prep schools and the Ivies (this State-U kid has been told or seen) of boys playing pick-up games of touch football in their "regular" clothes, which usually meant khakis or grey flannels, OCBDs and Shetlands. Since, some prep schools have uniforms, the boys might just take off their blazers and play in their ties, flannels, OCBDs and weejuns or bucks.

At least that's what I've learned based on images I've seen and reading about the "mystique" of it.

That said, I know of no tradition or famous pics, ect., of this happening with college kids and baseball. And nothing about that above illustration looks particularly authentic or inspiring.
 

FiscalDean

Super Member
There is a tradition at prep schools and the Ivies (this State-U kid has been told or seen) of boys playing pick-up games of touch football in their "regular" clothes, which usually meant khakis or grey flannels, OCBDs and Shetlands. Since, some prep schools have uniforms, the boys might just take off their blazers and play in their ties, flannels, OCBDs and weejuns or bucks.

I can appreciate your comments about the Ivies, I was so far removed from that possibility. Heck, I was lucky to get into a state school.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
What about the University of California system? They are state schools, not private or establishment, and some of them are truly world class (UC Berkeley, UCLA). And there's Cal Tech, certainly the equal of MIT, I think, although Cal Tech is private (and MIT as well).

My older brother worked for almost three decades in particle physics and cosmology at MIT, but he was never boastful about this, and laughed at academic snobbery and pretension. In the face of the complexity of the universe, he cultivated a humility that comes with research.

And I feel the same about mind and brain, my own field of cognitive neuroscience. It is humbling and exciting to look at the most complex thing known to us, the human brain, and spend time studying it. Science is a love affair with Nature. To this day, at 70, I have trouble believing that folks actually paid me a salary to do something -- research and teaching -- that I so thoroughly enjoyed doing! All that fun, and money too. The opportunity to do these things -- that I will always be grateful for.
 

Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
What about the University of California system? They are state schools, not private or establishment, and some of them are truly world class (UC Berkeley, UCLA). And there's Cal Tech, certainly the equal of MIT, I think, although Cal Tech is private (and MIT as well).

My older brother worked for almost three decades in particle physics and cosmology at MIT, but he was never boastful about this, and laughed at academic snobbery and pretension. In the face of the complexity of the universe, he cultivated a humility that comes with research.

And I feel the same about mind and brain, my own field of cognitive neuroscience. It is humbling and exciting to look at the most complex thing known to us, the human brain, and spend time studying it. Science is a love affair with Nature. To this day, at 70, I have trouble believing that folks actually paid me a salary to do something -- research and teaching -- that I so thoroughly enjoyed doing! All that fun, and money too. The opportunity to do these things -- that I will always be grateful for.
In my long military career, I spent most of my years in Psychological Operations and I felt the same way. They actually paid me to do this! It was a wonder.

And, yes, the UC is a grand institution. I graduated from what was, at the time, a tiny liberal arts campus. Today, Riverside is a major player with over 24,000 students and in a couple of fields (sub-tropical agriculture and entomology) unsurpassed by anyone anywhere. It even has a couple of Nobel winners on the faculty. I love that place.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
In my long military career, I spent most of my years in Psychological Operations and I felt the same way. They actually paid me to do this! It was a wonder.

And, yes, the UC is a grand institution. I graduated from what was, at the time, a tiny liberal arts campus. Today, Riverside is a major player with over 24,000 students and in a couple of fields (sub-tropical agriculture and entomology) unsurpassed by anyone anywhere. It even has a couple of Nobel winners on the faculty. I love that place.
What a coincidence! I continue to do research collaboration with a junior colleague in the laboratory that I founded, and he is from Bakersfield, CA. He did his BS in cognitive science from UCLA, and his PhD in the same discipline from UC Riverside! Unfortunately, the Covid virus shut down our lab effectively. Psychology labs need human subjects to run experiments, unless, of course one is working with animals.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
It's a difficult time for all. But when this 'clears' I am thinking of a MFA from Portland State U. They have a program in 'Studio' that doesn't specify which medium you use. 'Innnnteresting' said the woodworker.
That sounds like a great plan. I have heard of MFAs in many areas-- fiction and poetry, painting, sculpture, photography, graphic arts, etc., Why not woodworking? Once you have an MFA, you could probably teach at a university or college, if you enjoy teaching. Good luck!
 

Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
That sounds like a great plan. I have heard of MFAs in many areas-- fiction and poetry, painting, sculpture, photography, graphic arts, etc., Why not woodworking? Once you have an MFA, you could probably teach at a university or college, if you enjoy teaching. Good luck!
Teaching was my other life outside the military. I have taught a graduate education class or three and enjoyed it greatly. However, having reached the age most professors go emeritus, a new position seems unlikely. But I'd take part time!
 
Your email address will not be publicly visible. We will only use it to contact you to confirm your post.

IMPORTANT: BEFORE POSTING PLEASE CHECK THE DATE OF THE LAST POST OF THIS THREAD. IF IT'S VERY OLD, PLEASE CONSIDER REGISTERING FIRST, AND STARTING A NEW THREAD ABOUT THIS TOPIC.