eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Your illustration incites me to think of a young Clark Kent checking his watch and wondering if the ever so lovely Lois Lane, approaching from behind, has just seem him dropping off his equally lovely "side piece' a the competing newspaper of the Daily Planet, at which she works! I fear Clark Kent is in for a beat down. LOL. ;)
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Is that the crowd cheering the Dodgers, as they were winning the World Series a couple of nights ago?
Sadly no because there's not enough social distancing. :(

A grand illustration, depicting a classic, but also fading memory of an overflowing crowd at college football game. I must tell you, it is comforting to know that the young man wearing the Harvard feather in his cap, has his priorities straight...ya gotta feed the machine and then ya watch football! ;)
He also has good tastes in outerwear, as I believe he's wearing a Polo coat.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
I wonder if Surimachi was referring to the character in the classic film played by Gregory Peck. Maybe he could not use the full title, The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit because of copyright reasons.

My ideal suit has long been a basic Oxford grey flannel model, with medium weight cloth. No patterns, just the basic nicely mottled flannel. Three button closure, medium lapels, hook vent or two side vents, cuffed trousers, plain front or forward pleats. This suit will do for all but the most formal occasions, and for those, there's always a dinner jacket.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
I wonder if Surimachi was referring to the character in the classic film played by Gregory Peck. Maybe he could not use the full title, The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit because of copyright reasons.

My ideal suit has long been a basic Oxford grey flannel model, with medium weight cloth. No patterns, just the basic nicely mottled flannel. Three button closure, medium lapels, hook vent or two side vents, cuffed trousers, plain front or forward pleats. This suit will do for all but the most formal occasions, and for those, there's always a dinner jacket.
Now, in my fifties, and having owned a closet full of suits since my twenties, I can proudly say that every suit I own today is a shade of grey (except for one very old near-navy one that I haven't worn in, probably, a decade).

Over the years, I lost interest in having a lot of different-colored suits as I found I liked grey's simple, classic and (depending on shade and texture) always appropriate look the most.

It also allowed me to focus on better quality, but not more, supporting items - shirts, shoes, ties, belts, sweaters, etc. I upgraded those overtime, but have less of them than before because they are all oriented to working with a grey suit.

As mentioned in past posts, a fire in our apartment building's basement, while we were renovating our apartment - and storing most of our clothes down there - seriously reduced my wardrobe. That happened six-plus years ago, which was two years after I had already started working from home full time.

And since I work from home, combined with the general movement at work and in our culture overall to casual attire, I only replaced a very small number of the items that were lost. Hence, my business wardrobe is incomplete for a five-day-a-week suit-wearing life, but is more than enough for our business-and-life-casual-dress world.

I wish I had a need to buy a full suit wardrobe again as I would focus on making it a really well-done grey-suit-centric one. With what I've learned over the years and, now, at AAAC, I feel I could make it a killer. But alas, I type this in my usual WFH wardrobe of old chinos, an old T-shirt and an old sweatshirt with Smartwool socks and no shoes.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Now, in my fifties, and having owned a closet full of suits since my twenties, I can proudly say that every suit I own today is a shade of grey (except for one very old near-navy one that I haven't worn in, probably, a decade).

Over the years, I lost interest in having a lot of different-colored suits as I found I liked grey's simple, classic and (depending on shade and texture) always appropriate look the most.

It also allowed me to focus on better quality, but not more, supporting items - shirts, shoes, ties, belts, sweaters, etc. I upgraded those overtime, but have less of them than before because they are all oriented to working with a grey suit.

As mentioned in past posts, a fire in our apartment building's basement, while we were renovating our apartment - and storing most of our clothes down there - seriously reduced my wardrobe. That happened six-plus years ago, which was two years after I had already started working from home full time.

And since I work from home, combined with the general movement at work and in our culture overall to casual attire, I only replaced a very small number of the items that were lost. Hence, my business wardrobe is incomplete for a five-day-a-week suit-wearing life, but is more than enough for our business-and-life-casual-dress world.

I wish I had a need to buy a full suit wardrobe again as I would focus on making it a really well-done grey-suit-centric one. With what I've learned over the years and, now, at AAAC, I feel I could make it a killer. But alas, I type this in my usual WFH wardrobe of old chinos, an old T-shirt and an old sweatshirt with Smartwool socks and no shoes.
Take heart...comfort is the rule of the day! You are looking good. ;)
 

drpeter

Senior Member
It is interesting to note that, in the fifties and sixties, there wasn't much antipathy toward nylon or polyester. In many of these older adverts, the makers of the clothes seem to sing the merits of 100% dacron and trevira and orlon and other variants of these artificial fibres, along with earlier versions like nylon or acrylic, perhaps made through somewhat different processes (I think that was the case, I am no chemist).

So maybe it took some time and experience with these materials to realize that they were not quite as good as natural fibres -- breathability, comfort, aesthetics and so on. Then, of course, they started blending them with natural fibres in different proportions, and that was much better in terms of looks and comfort.

When I was living in India, the overwhelmingly common choice of fabric for shirts and trousers was either terycotton or terywool, a mixture of terylene with those natural fibres. Resistance to wrinkles was the main advantage cited by most people in selecting these types of cloth for their shirts and trousers. I have no idea what the fashion is now for materials. There is widespread use of ready-made clothing for everyday use. People still use tailors to get suits made, I think.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
LOL, I could not resist the urge: While thrifting, I recently picked up two McGregor summer ties, 100% cotton, with paintbrush patterns, for about $2.00 each. The patterns were unusual for me, I usually pick very traditional ones like reps and neats. I think these adverts that FF posts are continuing to do their job.
 
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