Fading Fast

Connoisseur
It is interesting to note that, in the fifties and sixties, there wasn't much antipathy toward nylon or polyester. In many of these older adverts, the makers of the clothes seem to sing the merits of 100% dacron and trevira and orlon and other variants of these artificial fibres, along with earlier versions like nylon or acrylic, perhaps made through somewhat different processes (I think that was the case, I am no chemist).

So maybe it took some time and experience with these materials to realize that they were not quite as good as natural fibres -- breathability, comfort, aesthetics and so on. Then, of course, they started blending them with natural fibres in different proportions, and that was much better in terms of looks and comfort.

When I was living in India, the overwhelmingly common choice of fabric for shirts and trousers was either terycotton or terywool, a mixture of terylene with those natural fibres. Resistance to wrinkles was the main advantage cited by most people in selecting these types of cloth for their shirts and trousers. I have no idea what the fashion is now for materials. There is widespread use of ready-made clothing for everyday use. People still use tailors to get suits made, I think.
I think you are spot on.

Originally (going back to the '30s based on the ads I've seen), man-made fibers were proudly advertised for qualities such as "wrinkle resistance" or "lighter weight." And blending with natural fibers does help a lot. Those "Poplin" summer suits we Trads like were sometimes blends and they were fine (although, to me, the all-cotton ones "felt" better).

In the '70s, when I was a kid, "polyester" was viewed as cheap. For the next two decades, man-made fibers had a taint. But then, about 20 years ago, they started improving, I guess, especially for gym clothes and have made a comeback. Obviously, I'm oversimplifying, but you get the idea: even in my lifetime, the view of man-made fibers has changed a lot.
 

drpeter

Super Member
I lament the fact that there are few camp collar shirts to be found, at least for men. We had these when I was growing up, they were usually shirts with square tails that were worn outside the pants, never tucked in. They were made up from thin cotton cloth and featured two pockets (no flaps), pretty much like the ones shown in this picture. They were perfect for warm climates, and the collar stayed flat and neat. We called them Manila shirts (maybe they were popular in that city).

In the West, we have a very similar shirt, originating in Cuba, and popular in other countries in Central and South America: The familiar Guayabera shirt. It often has some decorative work on the front. It is mostly informal but I think there are formal occasions on which it can be worn.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
I love the illustration and McGregor as a Brand is an old acquaintance of mine and so many others, but a white garment is so easily soiled, I fear the "White Heat" advertised would son become 'Grey Clouds' through our use of same. :(
The only white items I have are polo shirts and they take extra work to keep looking white (thank you, Oxiclean). I can't image a white jacket or, as I see people wear, white jeans or pants.
 
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