Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Initially, I wasn't going to post this illustration, but then, when I looked at the men in the background, I realized there was some cool stuff going on. The guy on the ground looks like he stepped out of the pages of "Apparel Arts," while the guy on the steps looks like he has on a classic raincoat (of which you don't see too many today).
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eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
The brand name alone should have sold a lot of those shirts. I could see myself wearing the grey plaid and the burgundy shirts, even now, but not with that top collar button buttoned. Today's illustration has me reflecting on the good old days, when I used to take multi day canoe trips down the AuSable River from Grayling, MI, to Oscoda, MI, camping along the river and cooking the morning's catch over an open fire (or if the fish were not biting that day, tearing open an MRE) and chowing down! Those were truly the days of wine and roses. ;)
 

drpeter

Super Member
I used to live in Michigan -- East Lansing, actually, post-docing at Michigan State University. It's a lovely part of the country, we went hiking in various places. And summer and fall weekends were spent at a friend's cottage at Half Moon Lake, not too far from Ann Arbor.
 

drpeter

Super Member
If the advert is using "cheques" to indicate the pattern in cloth we usually refer to as checks, it is quite likely incorrect usage. On the other hand, it could be some sort of pun. I can't quite see the detail on the jacket, maybe Fading Fast can help.

The term cheque is used exclusively to indicate that piece of paper you write out so that the bank can give you (or the person or business to whom you write the cheque) the specified amount from your bank account. What we call plaid patterns on cloth would be check patterns in Britain, as would the other meanings of that word, with one exception: checking a box to indicate that some condition has been met would be ticking the box, a check mark being a tick mark.

Language is so interesting (and often, so funny), especially when we consider a language like English, which is in use all over the world, and has developed by borrowing words and phrases from all over the world. It is truly a world language, not just England's language.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
LOL, I appreciate thae thought. While I've worn a fair number of McGregors designs in the past, I cannot recall ever wearing one of their sport coats. Indeed, I was blissfully ignorant of their existence, prior to reading your post. ;)
As was I. There are so many things that are like that - little things that happened in the history of a company that were there for a short period of time and, then, gone.

When I was a college kid in the '80s, the Au Bon Pain near the store I worked in came out with a Napoleon that was incredible. It was there for, maybe a year or so, and then gone.

When I asked what happened, they said it was complicated to make and store and not worth the limited demand they had for it. That was thirty five years ago. I'd bet almost no one but I - and a few other crazy fans of Au Bon Pain's brief flirtation with the Napoleon - even remember it once made one.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Deja' vue? The McGregor windbreakers I had were blue and a rusty tan hue, much like the sport coat pictured. Wish I still had those jackets, but I doubt they would fit my newly acquired girth! :(
Somewhere in my 20s, I'm pretty sure I, too, owned a McGregor windbreaker -mine was in navy .
 
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