godan

Advanced Member
^^
Great picture. The gentleman, while certainly projecting an arguably enigmatic look, does provide some hints at what he is about. The pistol he carries looks to be a German Luger P-08; semi-automatic action employing an 8 round box magazine of 9mm ammunition and exhibiting a nasty habit of malfunctioning in the heat of battle. Knowing that and noting the furtive look in his eyes, the gentleman is probably soiling the seat of those nice white pants he is wearing. Just thinkin.....:crazy:
 

godan

Advanced Member
View attachment 32538
Mead Schaeffer (1898-1980). The enigmatic man in the white suit and revolver. With the tropical suit and the Javanese puppet design in the background, this is presumably an illustration for a story set in the Far East. Schaeffer produced illustrations for many American magazines and numerous 'adventure' books, including 'Moby Dick' & 'The Count of Monte Christo'
The illustrator has his man holding the pistol correctly, with the trigger finger outside of the trigger guard. Unusual for the era.
 

Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
Several years ago, I saw an exhibit of his work at the Met here in NYC and realized that his influence - to this day - is incredible. Once you become familiar with his work, you can't help seeing its offspring in many current ads, artwork, branding etc..
In music, his counterpart would be Aaron Copeland. Get familiar with his work and suddenly you begin wondering how a small, slight Jewish composer from Brooklyn somehow set the example for the background music of every major Western movie you ever enjoyed. One of my music professors explained it by saying that all the film score composers studied under him. Makes sense. He was the dominant American composer of the century.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Love the artwork!

I wonder how comfortable those high, stiff club collars were. If this image is from the twenties, they were probably made of celluloid. My Dad wore detachable celluloid collars with some of his shirts in the fifties.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Love the artwork!

I wonder how comfortable those high, stiff club collars were. If this image is from the twenties, they were probably made of celluloid. My Dad wore detachable celluloid collars with some of his shirts in the fifties.
I can't imagine they were comfortable. I can see them irritating the heck out one's neck. But then they were quite popular, so one assumes they couldn't have been that terrible.
 
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