CorozoButtons

Starting Member
Hi everyone, my name is Raul and I represent Corozo Buttons. We have been working with corozo since the origins of the industry; in fact I'm a 4th generation corozo button manufacturer and a descendant of both of the original families who first traded corozo in europe at the turn of the 20th century. We make corozo buttons of all kinds, over 1500 models, for companies such as Ralph Lauren, J Crew, Brooks Brothers, etc. I have been reading this forum for a few months now and let me just say that it is an incredible source of knowledge; I learn something new each and every time I open a new thread. Andy graciously allowed me to sign up for an account a few months back and I would love to give back to the community. I thought the best way to do that was to do a Q&A about corozo, the material, the buttons, the history, etc. Anything you guys want to know, down to the microscopic makeup, I would be more than happy to provide all the information I can.

So go ahead! Shoot!
 
Last edited:

g3dahl

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Alexander -- good one!
:icon_smile_big:

CorozoButtons -- I look forward to learning about this topic. Thanks for being here!
 

JLibourel

Honors Member and King Fop
Slow-witted fellow that I am, it took me a couple of minutes to get Alex's joke.

I know that corozo buttons are a very fitting complement to high-grade tailoring, but you just don't see them discussed to any extent in the forum culture--all the interest seems to be in horn, metal or mother of pearl. This should be informative.
 

Alexander Kabbaz

Tech and Business Advice Guru
We sometimes use corozo buttons and corozo cufflinks. But since I get to ask the questions for a change ... what makes corozo preferable to wood species such as ebony, lignum vitae, tiga, and other super hard woods? Aside from appearance, are there advantages over mother-of-pearl?
 

Matt S

Connoisseur
What I've noticed about Corozo is that they can be dyed any colour, but they look great natural too. Are the natural buttons on the website actually natural in colour and texture? Do you do any with a glossy finish? And how does the strength compare to other common button materials, like horn, mother of pearl, plastic, etc.
 

CorozoButtons

Starting Member
Oh, nuts. :devil:

Welcome to the club.
Hehe, good one :)

Alexander -- good one!
:icon_smile_big:

CorozoButtons -- I look forward to learning about this topic. Thanks for being here!
Happy to be here, Alexander!

Slow-witted fellow that I am, it took me a couple of minutes to get Alex's joke.

I know that corozo buttons are a very fitting complement to high-grade tailoring, but you just don't see them discussed to any extent in the forum culture--all the interest seems to be in horn, metal or mother of pearl. This should be informative.
Absolutely, while horn and mother of pearl are also beautiful materials, they are very different. We have worked with horn a lot in the past, in fact we used to manufacture horn buttons years ago. Hopefully I can change the fact that corozo doesn't get discussed enough!

We sometimes use corozo buttons and corozo cufflinks. But since I get to ask the questions for a change ... what makes corozo preferable to wood species such as ebony, lignum vitae, tiga, and other super hard woods? Aside from appearance, are there advantages over mother-of-pearl?
Thanks for the question Alexander Kabbaz!

First of all, let me address something that I'm not sure if you are inferring within your question or not. By the way you say "and other hard woods" it sounds like you consider corozo a kind of wood and I would just like to clarify that is it not a type of wood. Corozo does come from a palm tree, however it is made from the mature seeds of this palm (phytelephas macrocarpas) and not from the bark itself. The seeds grow, in the wild, in large spiny clusters; they start as very soft, gelatinous, edible seeds and harden as they mature. They harden into progressively larger layers of different densities, sort of like an onion has layers; this is why you get the beautiful corozo "grain" effect.

Here's a picture of the seed clusters:



Now, as far as advantages to using corozo over hard woods, there are some, but again remember that you are considering two completely different materials.

Let me start with the environmental advantage. Corozo seeds are only good for button production once they are fully mature and have fallen off the tree. Workers pick up these clusters and extract the fully hardened seeds without damaging the palm; in fact corozo is a feral palm, it is not farmed because it needs many years to produce seeds and because they require very specific growing conditions that are very difficult to replicate (please read our informational page here to learn more). For this reason, the palms are not only not harmed, but they are also actively protected. Hard wood, on the other hand, has to be cut down in order to produce buttons; you can't just take a few buttons out without killing the tree. Most of these exotic hardwoods are sadly becoming more and more scarce every year to the point that some are nearing extinction.

Corozo also has advantages from a material standpoint. Unlike wood, corozo fibers are not linearly aligned; they are random, facing in all directions, making them much more susceptible to fine turning (carving) allowing for more intricate and beautiful designs. The same hardy structure allows corozo to last much longer than wood buttons. I have seen corozo buttons that are more than 80 years old and look the way they did when they were first made! Lastly the structure also makes them more homogeneous, meaning that they take dyes more evenly throughout than wood buttons do.

That leads me straight into the next point: the advantages of dyeing corozo versus wood. Raw corozo is ivory colored and has a porous surface, that makes it a prime material for dyeing. Unlike many hard woods, it can be dyed into any color, light or dark. It also allows the dye to reach deep into the buttons; when combined with the hardy corozo fibers, it gives corozo great scratch resistance.

Finally, while corozo is a beautiful and noble material, it is also a very strong material. It can withstand a lot of weight and impacts as well as extreme temperatures. As an interesting factoid, corozo is fire resistant and can even be used instead of coals for long burning fires. Obviously, it has limitations, as does any other material, but it withstands all processes such as dry cleaning and ironing quite well.

I hope that answers your question!

What I've noticed about Corozo is that they can be dyed any colour, but they look great natural too. Are the natural buttons on the website actually natural in colour and texture? Do you do any with a glossy finish? And how does the strength compare to other common button materials, like horn, mother of pearl, plastic, etc.
Hi Matt S,

Absolutely, they are completely natural! The only thing we do is give them a run in one of our water polishing drums and they come out ready for the showroom floor. No additives, nothing. Yes, we offer 4 levels of polishing: matte, semi-polish, polish and high polish. I would say that the vast majority of corozo buttons you see in stores are semi-polished. That means that we give them that wet polish I mentioned and they are ready. Semi polish looks very natural, not too shiny and not dull. Polish finish has a much higher shine to it, a lot like a plastic button. High polish buttons have highly reflective, mirror like shines. My favorite is semi-polish; it looks beautiful that way.

As I mentioned above, corozo is pretty strong. It has great impact resistance, extreme temperature resistance and holds up to abuse for many many years. Something that cannot be said for a lot of the other materials you listed.

Keep them coming guys, I'm really happy about the level of interest this has generated! We also have a facebook page where we show off our newest finishes and experimental buttons.
 

stubloom

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
As a dry cleaner specializing in high-end garments, I see hundreds of garments with corozo nut buttons on a weekly basis. I'm no expert in the technical aspects of these buttons but I have noticed that many corozo nut buttons -- particularly on garments owned by new clients -- are broken, cracked (as evidenced by hairline cracks) or chipped.

The Italian manufacturers, in particular, love these buttons because they are able to match the colors of the buttons very closely to the color of the fabric used. If you own a suit, sport coat or trouser by Canali, Zegna, Armani, Zanella or the like, I'd bet they have corozo nut buttons.

At RAVE FabriCARE, we take no chances with corozo nut buttons: we remove ALL corozo nut buttons prior to cleaning and replace them after cleaning and hand pressing. This way we can guarantee that they will never break, crack or chip -- at least on our watch.

If you own fine garments with corozo nut buttons, I would suggest that you ought to INSIST that your dry cleaner removes the buttons prior to cleaning.

The alternative? Investing much of your time to source a replacement set of corozo nut buttons. Why your time? Because the dry cleaner will most likely blame the manufacturer and tell you that he is not responsible for broken, cracked or chipped buttons. And, even if he finally admits responsibility, you'll most likely end up with a cheap set of plastic buttons that do not have a perfect color match and detracts from the overall beauty of the garment.

Here's some more information on the subject...

Blog post: Does your dry cleaner play Russian Roulette with your corozo nut buttons?

Blog link: https://www.ravefabricare.com/true-...an-roulette-with-your-corozo-nut-buttons.aspx
 
Last edited:

arkirshner

Honors Member
This thread has got me thinking about replacing buttons on a number of jackets I realize that retail internet sales are not a real profit center, and I do not expect you to spend a lot to make it more user friendly, but before ordering I must point out two things about your site. First, there is no color chart or enlarge to see the color with Buy by the Piece. No one wants to get the wrong color and the site would have us guess. Second, the listings in Buy by the Piece do not have the button size offered. Again no one wants to guess.

Regards,

Alan
 

Matt S

Connoisseur
At RAVE FabriCARE, we take no chances with corozo nut buttons: we remove ALL corozo nut buttons prior to cleaning and replace them after cleaning and hand pressing. This way we can guarantee that they will never break, crack or chip -- at least on our watch.

If you own fine garments with corozo nut buttons, I would suggest that you ought to INSIST that your dry cleaner removes the buttons prior to cleaning.
Some of my double-breasted suits have up to 20 exterior buttons (14 on the jacket and 6 on the trousers). That's quite a lot of time spent removing and resewing the buttons and must be quite expensive.
 

arkirshner

Honors Member
As a dry cleaner specializing in high-end garments, I see hundreds of garments with corozo nut buttons on a weekly basis. I'm no expert in the technical aspects of these buttons but I have noticed that many corozo nut buttons -- particularly on garments owned by new clients -- are broken, cracked (as evidenced by hairline cracks) or chipped.

The Italian manufacturers, in particular, love these buttons because they are able to match the colors of the buttons very closely to the color of the fabric used. If you own a suit, sport coat or trouser by Canali, Zegna, Armani, Zanella or the like, I'd bet they have corozo nut buttons.

At RAVE FabriCARE, we take no chances with corozo nut buttons: we remove ALL corozo nut buttons prior to cleaning and replace them after cleaning and hand pressing. This way we can guarantee that they will never break, crack or chip -- at least on our watch.

If you own fine garments with corozo nut buttons, I would suggest that you ought to INSIST that your dry cleaner removes the buttons prior to cleaning.

The alternative? Investing much of your time to source a replacement set of corozo nut buttons. Why your time? Because the dry cleaner will most likely blame the manufacturer and tell you that he is not responsible for broken, cracked or chipped buttons. And, even if he finally admits responsibility, you'll most likely end up with a cheap set of plastic buttons that do not have a perfect color match and detracts from the overall beauty of the garment.

Here's some more information on the subject...

Blog post: Does your dry cleaner play Russian Roulette with your corozo nut buttons?

Blog link: https://www.ravefabricare.com/true-...an-roulette-with-your-corozo-nut-buttons.aspx

Mr. B

You, sir, are a zealous perfectionist. Every time I read one of your posts I reflect on all the things I let slide that day and a sense of guilt comes over me. Fortunately you do not post that often.

I would never ask a dry cleaner to remove and replace buttons as I don't think there is anyone within a hour's drive that can sew a proper thread shank on a button. Out of curiosity, how long does it take your staff to properly sew on a shank thread button?

Regards,

Alan
 

stubloom

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Response to arkirshner:

It takes about a minute to resew a button with a cross-stitch and a shank. We normally charge 75c per button to remove and replace 4 hole buttons.

The additional cost for a Zegna 2 button suit (2 front buttons, 8 cuff buttons and 4 trouser buttons) would be approx $10.75. On a past thread, one forum member mentioned that he pays about $30 in NYC to have his suit buttons removed and replaced.

Contrast that to the alternative: contact the retail store to ask if they have any corozo nut buttons of a particular style and color. Drive to the store to inspect their "selection" (which is probably zero unless they offer Zegna MTM and have some spares laying around in some drawer). Call the USA office of Zegna or some of their retail stores to make a similar inquiry, and, if they do have some, send a digital photo of the button(s) your'e looking for and hope and pray that the button(s) they finally send you are correct. I could go on and on but I don't have a few hours to spare.

Bottom line: removing and replacing corozo nut buttons is much like preventative maintenance on a fine car. It eliminates the extraneous costs and anxiety associated with damage due to neglect.
 
Last edited:

CorozoButtons

Starting Member
As a dry cleaner specializing in high-end garments, I see hundreds of garments with corozo nut buttons on a weekly basis. I'm no expert in the technical aspects of these buttons but I have noticed that many corozo nut buttons -- particularly on garments owned by new clients -- are broken, cracked (as evidenced by hairline cracks) or chipped.

The Italian manufacturers, in particular, love these buttons because they are able to match the colors of the buttons very closely to the color of the fabric used. If you own a suit, sport coat or trouser by Canali, Zegna, Armani, Zanella or the like, I'd bet they have corozo nut buttons.

At RAVE FabriCARE, we take no chances with corozo nut buttons: we remove ALL corozo nut buttons prior to cleaning and replace them after cleaning and hand pressing. This way we can guarantee that they will never break, crack or chip -- at least on our watch.

If you own fine garments with corozo nut buttons, I would suggest that you ought to INSIST that your dry cleaner removes the buttons prior to cleaning.

The alternative? Investing much of your time to source a replacement set of corozo nut buttons. Why your time? Because the dry cleaner will most likely blame the manufacturer and tell you that he is not responsible for broken, cracked or chipped buttons. And, even if he finally admits responsibility, you'll most likely end up with a cheap set of plastic buttons that do not have a perfect color match and detracts from the overall beauty of the garment.

Here's some more information on the subject...

Blog post: Does your dry cleaner play Russian Roulette with your corozo nut buttons?

Blog link: https://www.ravefabricare.com/true-...an-roulette-with-your-corozo-nut-buttons.aspx
There are several reasons why this can happen and it has a lot to do with the way corozo behaves when soaked. Corozo, like a lot of other organic materials, expands when it is put in water for an extended period of time (1-2hrs+). This expansion is really useful for manufacturers because it allows the corozo to dye more easily as the pores are expanded and allow dyes to penetrate more easily. The downside is that they become temporarily weaker while expanded, specially so if they are thin buttons. That doesn't mean they will break easily, but it makes them more susceptible to it.

One problem we see very often is that the threads holding the buttons are not elastic or fastened too tightly, so when the button expands, it has nowhere to go and the threads crack them. The other problem is that most manufacturers don't know that corozo shouldn't be "flash dried". After dyeing, they throw them in an oven with fast moving air to get them dry and out the door quickly. That really weakens the material, in fact, while doing tests to calibrate our drying room, we find we can get buttons to easily crack just from drying them too fast.

Yet another reason why buttons can crack is because some manufacturers are cheating. They may buy old material or second rate material and use a very aggressive bleaching process to turn it white before they use it. Sometimes even the raw corozo blanks dealers do this so they can sell B material for an A material price. Very aggressive bleaching weakens buttons at a molecular level...the next time they are exposed to water and heat then they tend to have problems.

It's easy to forget that this is a natural material after all and should be handled as such. If it is manufactured correctly and treated well, it will last much much longer than the rest of the garment. Designers have a tendency to push the boundaries of materials too, they sometimes request an extremely thin button or a button with a clear structural weakness and we warn them that breaking may occur. We do impact testing and resistance testing in house all the time and warn them accordingly.

We can spot these things pretty easily and never buy bleached material. We know the limits of what buttons can handle and if we don't feel comfortable / they don't pass our tests, then we either don't make them or we give clothiers special warnings. That said, knowledge is power, we make hundreds of thousands of buttons every month and very few of them come back to us with problems. Why? Because we know how to handle the material and we know how to make buttons resistant.


This thread has got me thinking about replacing buttons on a number of jackets I realize that retail internet sales are not a real profit center, and I do not expect you to spend a lot to make it more user friendly, but before ordering I must point out two things about your site. First, there is no color chart or enlarge to see the color with Buy by the Piece. No one wants to get the wrong color and the site would have us guess. Second, the listings in Buy by the Piece do not have the button size offered. Again no one wants to guess.

Regards,

Alan
Hi Alan,

Neither our site, nor our logistical structure is designed to be a B2P model. We used to have a lot more options of buttons to purchase samples from, but we didnt find too many people who were interested. People don't generally want to replace the buttons themselves, so they take their suits/shirts to a tailor. We sell to tailors :)

As far as a color chart, we will have one soon for reference. Our color gamut is infinite, we dye to match any swatch or pantone code or anything really. That is why having a color chart on our website is not particularly helpful. Designers usually have a set idea of what they want.

You are completely right about that! Maybe if I get some feedback as to what you guys would like to be able to purchase directly from our website then I would be happy to start a new program. For example something like sets for suits pre-dyed in normal suit colors like navy, black, etc.

Response to arkirshner:

It takes about a minute to resew a button with a cross-stitch and a shank. We normally charge 75c per button to remove and replace 4 hole buttons.

The additional cost for a Zegna 2 button suit (2 front buttons, 8 cuff buttons and 4 trouser buttons) would be approx $10.75. On a past thread, one forum member mentioned that he pays about $30 in NYC to have his suit buttons removed and replaced.

Contrast that to the alternative: contact the retail store to ask if they have any corozo nut buttons of a particular style and color. Drive to the store to inspect their "selection" (which is probably zero unless they offer Zegna MTM and have some spares laying around in some drawer). Call the USA office of Zegna or some of their retail stores to make a similar inquiry, and, if they do have some, send a digital photo of the button(s) your'e looking for and hope and pray that the button(s) they finally send you are correct. I could go on and on but I don't have a few hours to spare.

Bottom line: removing and replacing corozo nut buttons is much like preventative maintenance on a fine car. It eliminates the extraneous costs and anxiety associated with damage due to neglect.
This is wonderful, its sad that very few dry cleaners offer service like this! Clothiers should demand more from their manufacturers too. We stand behind our product and look into these matters seriously. We actually had a customer's customer contact us recently. She had a suit that was several years old and had lost a button. The clothier didn't have any extras anymore so they told her to come to us. We were able to identify the model for her (rough when all you get is a picture and you have 1500 models to look through) and pull some out of stock, we dyed it in the exact color she needed and shipped 10 buttons out to her.
 

stubloom

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Raul:

Thank you for taking the time to formulate that response. All I can say is WOW!

From a dry cleaner's point of view, that's the very best -- and most concise -- explanation of the technical issues associated with corozo nut buttons Iv'e yet come across. And I've spent countless hours combing the internet for that information.

As a result of your explanation, I might just have stumbled upon the reason why some corozo nut buttons break, crack or chip so easily.....

Ordinary dry cleaning is all about throughput: how many "pieces" can you push through the production system (tagging, cleaning, pressing and bagging) in the shortest possible time and at the lowest possible cost. As far as the dry cleaning is concerned, that typically means reducing the wash time, increasing the extract RPMs, CRANKING UP THE DRYING TEMPERATURES and reducing the cool down time. Leaving aside, for the moment, the detrimental effect of such practices on the longevity of garments, please comment on the possible impact on a corozo nut button of CRANKING UP THE DRYING TEMPERATURES?
 
Last edited:

CorozoButtons

Starting Member
Raul:

Thank you for taking the time to formulate that response. All I can say is WOW!

From a dry cleaner's point of view, that's the very best -- and most concise -- explanation of the technical issues associated with corozo nut buttons Iv'e yet come across. And I've spent countless hours combing the internet for that information.

As a result of your explanation, I might just have stumbled upon the reason why some corozo nut buttons break, crack or chip so easily.....

Ordinary dry cleaning is all about throughput: how many "pieces" can you push through the production system (tagging, cleaning, pressing and bagging) in the shortest possible time and at the lowest possible cost. As far as the dry cleaning is concerned, that typically means reducing the wash time, increasing the extract RPMs, CRANKING UP THE DRYING TEMPERATURES and reducing the cool down time. Leaving aside, for the moment, the detrimental effect of such practices on the longevity of garments, please comment on the possible impact on a corozo nut button of CRANKING UP THE DRYING TEMPERATURES?
stubloom,

You're very welcome, that's what I was hoping I could do for your guys!

I think you've hit the nail right on the head! When corozo dries too quickly, at too high a temperature it has a tendency to warp and break. To be more specific, I can give you a little information with regards to our drying process. When we need to dry buttons we often do it in a two step process; first we put it through a centrifuge at a maximum temperature of 30C and then in a drying room with a max temperature of 40C over several hours. Anything higher than that begins to cause problems with cracking. Why? Because the surface of the button dries more quickly than the inside, it contracts and creates cracks on the surface, weakening the button. If the button is dry, it can handle more than 100C without damage.

One of our special finishes, called crackled, uses an agent and heat to very quickly dehydrate the surface of buttons. It is a beautiful effect, but it gives should give you an idea of what happens when drying at different rates occurs.


I am not entirely familiar with what kind of temperatures you use for dry cleaning, but if you are applying strong heat to a semi-soaked button, there is a very good chance that is why they are breaking on you. The real enemy of corozo is high temperature during drying, otherwise the buttons can easily handle just about any heat you can throw at them.
 

Alexander Kabbaz

Tech and Business Advice Guru
So ... it sounds to me as if you just put the garment on a hanger and let it air dry overnight there should be no problem with the corozo. Or did I miss something ... besides throughput?
 

stubloom

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Alexander:

Sounds like rational approach but it can't work for this reason: Irrespective of the solvent or fluid used (the most common solvents/fluids are perc, synthetic petroleum or siloxane), and irrespective of the brand of machine used (the operational concepts behind all machines are similar), garments in a dry clean machine go through 4 cycles -- wash, extract, dry and cool down/deodorization cycles. The purpose of the dry cycle is to vaporize the dry cleaning solvent or fluid from the garments. The vapor is then liquified and the resultant (purified) solvent or fluid is reused.

Without the dry cycle and the cool down/deodorization cycle, garments would take forever to dry, the dry cleaning solvent or fluid in the garments after the wash cycle could not be reclaimed, and the garment would smell (particularly if you clean in perc or synthetic petroleum).

Furthermore, the 2 solvents used by approx. 95% of all cleaners -- perc and synthetic petroleum solvent -- are classified as VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) by the EPA. So it would be illegal to dry clean garments in perc or synthetic petroleum and allow those garments to hang dry OUTSIDE a tightly sealed dry cleaning machine.

For a garment with corozo nut buttons that requires cleaning, there appears to be only 2 options:

(1) sponge and press if the garment does not require a complete cleaning inside a dry cleaning machine, or

(2) dry cleaning if the garment requires cleaning inside a dry cleaning machine.

In the case of option 2, it would seem to me that removal of all corozo nut buttons prior to cleaning and replacement after pressing is the most responsible and cost-effective approach.
 
Last edited:

CorozoButtons

Starting Member
Alexander:

Sounds like rational approach but it can't work for this reason: Irrespective of the solvent or fluid used (the most common solvents/fluids are perc, synthetic petroleum or siloxane), and irrespective of the brand of machine used (the operational concepts behind all machines are similar), garments in a dry clean machine go through 4 cycles -- wash, extract, dry and cool down/deodorization cycles. The purpose of the dry cycle is to vaporize the dry cleaning solvent or fluid from the garments. The vapor is then liquified and the resultant (purified) solvent or fluid is reused.

Without the dry cycle and the cool down/deodorization cycle, garments would take forever to dry, the dry cleaning solvent or fluid in the garments after the wash cycle could not be reclaimed, and the garment would smell (particularly if you clean in perc or synthetic petroleum).

Furthermore, the 2 solvents used by approx. 95% of all cleaners -- perc and synthetic petroleum solvent -- are classified as VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) by the EPA. So it would be illegal to dry clean garments in perc or synthetic petroleum and allow those garments to hang dry OUTSIDE a tightly sealed dry cleaning machine.

For a garment with corozo nut buttons that requires cleaning, there appears to be only 2 options:

(1) sponge and press if the garment does not require a complete cleaning inside a dry cleaning machine, or

(2) dry cleaning if the garment requires cleaning inside a dry cleaning machine.

In the case of option 2, it would seem to me that removal of all corozo nut buttons prior to cleaning and replacement after pressing is the most responsible and cost-effective approach.
How long does the entire process take and how long are the buttons submerged in fluid?

Reason I ask is that if the buttons are not staying submerged for more than a few minutes at a time, then there's really a very small chance that this is the culprit. In order to dye buttons, we sometimes have to let them soak for 6-12 hours. With that said, I think that unless you are cooking the buttons quickly after the wash, then there shouldn't be any problems.

Our buttons are normally machine washable and you can simply toss them in the dryer afterwards, just as long as you don't let them soak (pre-wash or forget them in the washer) for extended periods of time. The only times we tell clothiers that the buttons are dry clean only is when they are thin or they are weaker than normal because of some kind of treatment like the one shown above. That being said, it is a natural material, there can be microscopic flaws in the raw material from the start and we expect that a small percentage may crack. This is really no different than most materials, specially other natural ones. We have a stringent quality control process where each button is checked front and back for color and flaws. On difficult models, we may discard up to 5-10% of the order before we are happy with the results. If anyone would like to see pictures of our process, factory and machinery, look us up on facebook!

Also, while we continue our discussion about dry-cleaning corozo, if anyone has any other types of questions, I'd be happy to discuss those too.

Raul
 
Your email address will not be publicly visible. We will only use it to contact you to confirm your post.

IMPORTANT: BEFORE POSTING PLEASE CHECK THE DATE OF THE LAST POST OF THIS THREAD. IF IT'S VERY OLD, PLEASE CONSIDER REGISTERING FIRST, AND STARTING A NEW THREAD ABOUT THIS TOPIC.