DSD

New Member
I just ordered a new 258 in the brown color (which, BTW, I really like - tan seemed to get too stained and I never warmed to the green color bags). However, the hand carry straps seem much thinner and less substantial than on previous Filson bags I have owned. Oddly, the rear carry strap is thicker than the front one which is noticeably thinner and feels much less substantial. Even the leather side pieces that the shoulder strap attaches to seem thinner and less substantial than on prior bags. Am I nuts? Has anyone else gotten a new bag recently and found this to be the case? Just wondering if Filson has begun cutting some corners, which would be quite disappointing. Don't get me wrong, I think the overall quality of the bag is fine and will hold up ok but there does seem to be a noticeable difference....
 

nmcheese

New Member
Picked up a 230 small field bag as a camera carrier about six months ago - fit and finish appears excellent. So far it has shrugged off coffee shops and Mt. Rainier rocks and still looks like it was purchased yesterday.
 

OCULUS NY

New Member
I just ordered a new 258 in the brown color (which, BTW, I really like - tan seemed to get too stained and I never warmed to the green color bags). However, the hand carry straps seem much thinner and less substantial than on previous Filson bags I have owned. Oddly, the rear carry strap is thicker than the front one which is noticeably thinner and feels much less substantial. Even the leather side pieces that the shoulder strap attaches to seem thinner and less substantial than on prior bags. Am I nuts? Has anyone else gotten a new bag recently and found this to be the case? Just wondering if Filson has begun cutting some corners, which would be quite disappointing. Don't get me wrong, I think the overall quality of the bag is fine and will hold up ok but there does seem to be a noticeable difference....
Call 'em and ask: you may have gotten a second. Or you may be onto something...just look at Gokey and all the others who have sunk to new Sino lows.
 

dbgrate

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I'm on my second Cover cloth Foul Weather coat of theirs.The first was otter green which,over time,I beat the hell out of..a great coat! It's replacement is a newer Brown version.As soon as I received it,a difference was noted in quality.I've had it for about 2 years now;it's a good jacket,but not up to what preceeded it.The protective finish is not as "protective" and the cloth itself not as resilient.I'd guess that Filson would insist nothing's changed...I don't buy it.Generally,I like their line of goods in spite of the bulk of it being definitely overpriced,particularly because the pricing is based on past quality and reputation,not the present diminished version.
 

budrichard

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Filson was purchased and revitalized in the late 1980's or so.
A few years ago Filson was sold to a holding company and the seller put on the board or a nice way to say, retired. Since then to increase profit margin Filson has increasingly been sourcing garments from off shore, but still charging the same price. I would expect that this reduction in expense/quality would continue in other areas until Filson completely goes the way of Eddire Bauer. For those of you that don't remember, at one time Eddie Bauer made real survival gear.
Personally, I now purchase all my Filson gear on eBay, verify made in the USA and not from Filson.-Dick
 

RTW

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Interesting Filson article (partial text) published in The Seattle Times on 07/01/05.

Link to full article (free registration required to view):
https://seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi...&date=20050701



The Genuine Article

Lynda V. Mapes


FOR MORE THAN 100 years, if you needed rugged clothing, the Filson outfitting store in Seattle has been the place to buy it.

Thorn-proof, snake-proof, rain-proof, wind-proof, the waxed-canvas shelter cloth and heavy virgin-wool garments sewn right off the selling floor are as tough and durable as they come, earning the company a devoted following among the outdoor set. These folks don't bat an eye at paying $130 for a wool shirt; $219 for a sweater, $22 for a pair of socks.

Others are welcome to make it cheaper; that's not Filson's niche. Nobody shops at Filson for price; they shop there for quality, and a distinct, low-tech, old-Seattle aesthetic. Wax. Canvas. Wool. Cotton. Leather. Brass. There's not a scrap of Gore-Tex in sight.

Started in 1897 as an outfitter for stampeders on their way to the Klondike gold rush, Filson is as Seattle as cloud cover.

But the company has a new owner as of January — an investment outfit in (gasp) Southern California — and a Connecticut-based CEO who earned his pinstripes as an executive at Ralph Lauren Polo. And some changes are in store.

Oh, the double mackinaw that could turn back a bullet and waxed-canvas tin-cloth pants that feel like they could stand up all on their own will still be in stock. But a new, softer Filson "lodge" line — partly made overseas for the first time in this company's history — is coming.

What will they think of next, the duck-blind denizen might ask. Well, a line of women's clothing, for starters. And next? A few things for dogs. And ... pause... breathe... 14 more stores in major metropolitan areas.

All heralded with a national advertising campaign. We are talking not just hunting and fishing publications but the Wall Street Journal.

Filson motto: "The goods we quote must not be confounded with the cheap and vastly inferior grade with which the market is over-run. Such goods are not only useless for the purpose for which they are intended, but the person wearing them would be better off without them."
Clinton C. Filson, 1914 catalog Those old sourdoughs must be turning in their mine tailings.

This is way, way new stuff for a company whose first catalog included tips for staking a mining claim, testing a colleague for death (stick with a pin), field-dressing a dog bite (burn with a hot coal) and reviving someone who's fainted (useful after that hot-coal treatment).

How the Klondike meets Connecticut is yet to be seen. But new CEO Doug Williams — raised on a family farm in South Dakota, actually, so don't hold Connecticut against him — says the loyal Filsonite has nothing to fear and a lot of new options to look forward to.

"This company will always have tin cloth in its blood. It will always have bridle leather in its blood, and it will always have Seattle in its blood," Williams pledged during a visit to the Seattle flagship store, wearing, it must be noted, boat shoes with no socks. This, the CEO of a company that sells barbed-wire-proof chaps.

ACROSS THE COUNTRY, purveyors of mass-produced garments have been cutting their throats along with their costs in a global race to the bottom. Filson managed to stay above the fray.

But the company is turning to overseas manufacturers for some of its new lodge line because that is where the investment in equipment and top-quality execution is found for some types of garments, Williams explains, adding, "What I want to do is make the best product, period. Then we'll source it appropriately."

And for many of the things the company makes, that will continue to mean making it in Seattle. Filson is one of the only clothing stores in Seattle, maybe for many miles, where buyers considering a purchase can look through a window at the people making the product in the next room.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
For those of you that don't remember, at one time Eddie Bauer made real survival gear.
Some great quality down parkas among it.

Cue tintin, "Not as good as it was, but better than it will be."

Cue me, "The trouble with the way America does business, is the way American Business does business."

I think I like tintin's better.

Anyone for price point marketing and the inevitable consequent total Junkification of America?
 
G

Guest-23641

Guest
I’m very disappointed to see the quality go down I used to buy along my work shirts and jackets from Filson
 

challer

Senior Member
Whenever you see PE and a transition to more fashion over function, quality dies. North Face, AF, Pendleton, Woolrich, are good examples. Barbour is giving off similar vibes but the British made seem to maintain standards. When I last visited Filson a year ago, the real outdoor gear was hard to find.
 

David J. Cooper

Super Member
I bought an XL Duffle last year and a bridle leather dog collar and leash 3:years ago. The quality of these items appeared to be very fine.

After 3 years the collar and leash have taken on a patina from some hard doggie use. The dog is still very pleased.

The duffle has been through a lot. First it spent 3 weeks jammed full (23kg) travelling by plane , train and automobile through France, England and Spain. Often dragged or thrown onto rough surfaces or piled under baggage on various high speed trains. Then 3 week long golf trips filled to bulging and thrown into vehicles and hotel rooms.

It is a bit soiled but shows no sign of wear. Other items we own,bought over the last decade have all performed well.

I have been in the Vancouver store a few times and everything I have seen there looks great.

BTW they mark outlet and seconds with a Sharpie circle on the white tag.
 
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fishertw

Advanced Member
My recent inclination by looking at their glossy catalogs is that they are headed toward fashion rather than function. The last thing I purchased was a guide sweater about 15 years ago and it was, and continues to be great. Since the ad folks have started changing the catalogs I have been wary.
 

Sam H

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Does everyone responding realize that this is a 2009 thread that was randomly bumped :D

The real question is, how are everyone’s Filson pieces from 12 year ago holding up? Then we’ll know for sure if it was still a good buy in 2009! All that’s left is inventing a time machine and we’re golden.
 

David J. Cooper

Super Member
Does everyone responding realize that this is a 2009 thread that was randomly bumped :D

The real question is, how are everyone’s Filson pieces from 12 year ago holding up? Then we’ll know for sure if it was still a good buy in 2009! All that’s left is inventing a time machine and we’re golden.
If I remember correctly it was decided amongst ourselves that we would not ignore people who revived old threads. Often it is new members or guests who revive them and have something valuable to add.
 

Sam H

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
That is fair, but I just wanted to make sure people realized that it was 2009 Filson being called out and not present day Filson, as a lot may have changed since then (for better or worse, I’m unfamiliar with any of their products in person now or then). The person who bumped it seemed to be disappointed by a potentially outdated premise and maybe they hadn’t seen the date of the OP and were put off without good basis and had just found this thread through Google or something.
 
G

Guest-490261

Guest
Over the past 6 or 7 years I’ve actually returned most items I’ve bought. Shirts wear holes in the fabric, vest zippers that you might find on a woman’s dress, I’ve been mostly disappointed with their quality lately. That pains me to say because I like the brand and have used their gear since I was a kid. It’s apparent they are cutting corners and the brand is headed the same direction as AF, etc. Sad to see.
 
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