DoghouseReilly

Senior Member
Good morning, gents. I got a wild thought this morning; do you think its possible to brush a regular shetland sweater to something approaching a Shaggy Dog? Various sources say that the original Shaggy Dogs were hand-brushed, but technique or the type of brush isn't included (and why would it be?). Below is a photo of the machine Harley's of Scotland claims to use.




https://www.harleyofscotland.com/mens-shop/24747-mens-brushed-seamless-shetland-crew-neck-sweater

I've got a few shetlands I'd be willing to experiment with if anyone has any ideas. About 45 minutes of internet searching hasn't pulled up anything on the topic, so we might be blazing new trails here. Please let me know what you think.
 

SketchHood

Starting Member
I actually went through a phase where I was dead set on turning normal shetlands into shaggy dogs a couple years ago. In the end I used a cat hair brush; something like this



The following pictures are the results:





and next is a J Press shaggy dog for comparison:



In the end, it was a decent amount of work for to brush the sweater and if I had spent more time on it I probably could have made it even shaggier. These pictures are after 2 years of moderate wear (maybe once per week during the winter) and a couple hand washes. When I first brushed the sweater it looked even shaggier than it does in the pictures.
 

32rollandrock

Connoisseur
This--a cat hair brush--is exactly what I envisioned when reading the OP. Nice result. I'm guessing, though, that there would be holes if this was done with a less-worthy Shetland. My Shaggy Dog is thick as all get-out. Other shetlands I own are much less thick without being brushed. Proceed at own risk, I guess.

I actually went through a phase where I was dead set on turning normal shetlands into shaggy dogs a couple years ago. In the end I used a cat hair brush; something like this



The following pictures are the results:





and next is a J Press shaggy dog for comparison:



In the end, it was a decent amount of work for to brush the sweater and if I had spent more time on it I probably could have made it even shaggier. These pictures are after 2 years of moderate wear (maybe once per week during the winter) and a couple hand washes. When I first brushed the sweater it looked even shaggier than it does in the pictures.
 

SketchHood

Starting Member
This--a cat hair brush--is exactly what I envisioned when reading the OP. Nice result. I'm guessing, though, that there would be holes if this was done with a less-worthy Shetland. My Shaggy Dog is thick as all get-out. Other shetlands I own are much less thick without being brushed. Proceed at own risk, I guess.

Actually, the Spirit of Shetland sweaters aren't super thick and there is absolutely no compromise in the integrity of the sweater--at least from what I can tell. I also tested the method on a couple sweaters that were thrifted and had similar results, none of which involved holes or undesirable effects.
 

32rollandrock

Connoisseur
I learn something new every day. Thanks.

Actually, the Spirit of Shetland sweaters aren't super thick and there is absolutely no compromise in the integrity of the sweater--at least from what I can tell. I also tested the method on a couple sweaters that were thrifted and had similar results, none of which involved holes or undesirable effects.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Acknowledging in advance that what follows probably runs counter to the opinions of many, but I struggle to understand why anyone would consciously set out to artificially age an expensive sweater they purchased, simply to pursue a fad (no offense intended by the use of the term fad). A couple of shaggy dog sweaters are to be found in my knitwear collection, but I cannot imagine intentionally adding wear and tear to my other crewneck sweaters to add to my count of "shaggy dogs." I think I may be just too darned much of a tightwad to do that! However, for those who do, more power to ya. LOL. ;)
 

YoungSoulRebel

Inactive user
eagle2250 I have to say that your contributions to this site are a true inspiration to me. Everything from the way you explain what you are listening to music wise to your exceedingly polite and interesting musings about whichever topic you are replying to. You are truly a class act and even when I don't quite agree with you (which is rare) I always throughly enjoy your posts.


Acknowledging in advance that what follows probably runs counter to the opinions of many, but I struggle to understand why anyone would consciously set out to artificially age an expensive sweater they purchased, simply to pursue a fad (no offense intended by the use of the term fad). A couple of shaggy dog sweaters are to be found in my knitwear collection, but I cannot imagine intentionally adding wear and tear to my other crewneck sweaters to add to my count of "shaggy dogs." I think I may be just too darned much of a tightwad to do that! However, for those who do, more power to ya. LOL. ;)
 

DoghouseReilly

Senior Member
I actually went through a phase where I was dead set on turning normal shetlands into shaggy dogs a couple years ago. In the end I used a cat hair brush; something like this...
SketchHood, thanks for the tip. I'll give it a try here and post my results if anyone else is interested.

Acknowledging in advance that what follows probably runs counter to the opinions of many, but I struggle to understand why anyone would consciously set out to artificially age an expensive sweater they purchased, simply to pursue a fad (no offense intended by the use of the term fad). A couple of shaggy dog sweaters are to be found in my knitwear collection, but I cannot imagine intentionally adding wear and tear to my other crewneck sweaters to add to my count of "shaggy dogs." I think I may be just too darned much of a tightwad to do that! However, for those who do, more power to ya. LOL. ;)
Eagle, I may have you beat in the tightwad department in that I can't bring myself to pay even the sales price for a single Shaggy Dog. :) I understand your sentiment, and not to belabor the point, but how is paying J. Press to brush your sweater for you any different than doing it yourself?
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
^^LOL. Well legend has it that I'm so cheap, when leaving the house, I jump out a first floor window to save wear and tear on the hinges of our front door...or so says the wife, but you do make a very valid point regarding J Press pricing! ;)

eagle2250 I have to say that your contributions to this site are a true inspiration to me. Everything from the way you explain what you are listening to music wise to your exceedingly polite and interesting musings about whichever topic you are replying to. You are truly a class act and even when I don't quite agree with you (which is rare) I always throughly enjoy your posts.
Thank you for those very kind and generous words. I am always learning from you and so many other members of AAAC and hence have a great deal of respect for all of you and try to contribute when I can add positively to the mix. Glad to hear that that respect shows through in at least some of my postings. Thanks again!
 

L-feld

Advanced Member
I'm guessing, though, that there would be holes if this was done with a less-worthy Shetland. My Shaggy Dog is thick as all get-out.
This made me immediately think of the "lightweight" shaggy dogs that York St. sells. I remember looking at one in the Greenwich Village shop and thinking it resembled a spider web in some parts.
 

32rollandrock

Connoisseur
I would generally agree with this. I stumbled across a Lord Jeff shetland sweater at the thrift today. Made in Scotland and pretty nice, but with a truly awful pattern to it, a bunch of squares of various colors interlocked together. It was $5, and I left it because it was just too fugly. But, it might be worth it when it goes down to 69 cents, and I presume that it will still be there. At that price point, it's worth trying the cat hair brush--if nothing else, it might dull the borders of the hideous squares.

Acknowledging in advance that what follows probably runs counter to the opinions of many, but I struggle to understand why anyone would consciously set out to artificially age an expensive sweater they purchased, simply to pursue a fad (no offense intended by the use of the term fad). A couple of shaggy dog sweaters are to be found in my knitwear collection, but I cannot imagine intentionally adding wear and tear to my other crewneck sweaters to add to my count of "shaggy dogs." I think I may be just too darned much of a tightwad to do that! However, for those who do, more power to ya. LOL. ;)
 

Doctor Damage

Connoisseur
Top marks to SketchHood for an apparently successful D.Y.I. project.

However, in my opinion shaggy dog sweaters are feminine in appearance and should be avoided, trad tradition be damned.
 

universitystripe

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Top marks to SketchHood for an apparently successful D.Y.I. project.

However, in my opinion shaggy dog sweaters are feminine in appearance and should be avoided, trad tradition be damned.
I must disagree. My Shaggy Dog sweaters are rather bulky, and I can't imagine any woman ever wearing one.

Edit: Also, what is "D.Y.I"? Do Yourself In? I think I'll start using that.
 
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