Nobleprofessor

Super Member
To be honest, I cannot ever remember seeing a Burberry garment that would be worth the cost of reweaving. The quality just isn't there to justify it.
i think you are wrong about that. Some of the older burberry stuff was very high quality. If it not the older quality stuff, it could still be worth it if the item has high value. There is lots of Burberry stuff that still sells for a lot of money whether it's quality or not.
 

32rollandrock

Connoisseur
i think you are wrong about that. Some of the older burberry stuff was very high quality. If it not the older quality stuff, it could still be worth it if the item has high value. There is lots of Burberry stuff that still sells for a lot of money whether it's quality or not.
This might be true, but at some point, if you're getting stuff re-woven so you can flip it, it might be worth taking a deep breath and asking yourself whether you've gone over the edge. I can't speak from experience, but from what I can discern, $50 is about the starting point for getting a pretty small hole re-woven. Not many odd jackets, or even suits, flip for that much. i'm thinking you'd have to get into Kiton territory before it's worth considering, and that's a decision I've never had to make, having never found Kiton. Also, as Stubloom suggests, if there's one hole, there's a good chance that larvae have made progress toward others that will open up on the first dry cleaning.

I've flipped my share of Robert Graham shirts and other unwearable stuff, but I'm not sure I could bring myself to do a re-weave job on something that I know isn't of high quality simply so I could sell it. OTOH, I have considered a re-weave job on an Oxxford suit that fits me beautifully--it's worth $100 or so to bring back a quality suit that has served me well. And some Burberry, as you note, is outstanding. I'm thinking particularly of my vintage Burberry top coat with sheared beaver collar that weighs about six tons and would stop a bullet.
 
G

Guest-908302

Guest
The other day I came across a nice Burberry guncheck sport coat. Upon taking it to the counter I spotted a moth hole on the sleeve. I left it but am considering going back to see if it's still there if it were possible and not too cost prohibitive to reweave it. I've never had this done before so I'm not sure the feasibility. The hole isn't too big--typical size I guess--and is on the inner sleeve so not terribly visible. Furthermore, the pattern of greys and blues doesn't have much contrast so I don't think that a reweaving of the hole in a solid color would stand out.

For those who have done this, what am I looking at in terms of cost and feasibility?
 

drpeter

Senior Member
I've had excellent work done on reweaving small moth holes, especially with garments I value because of sentimental reasons. My experience has been with a company called Without a Trace in Chicago, which you can find easily on the web. The work I had done was over a decade ago and a hole the size of a penny (US) or a bit larger cost me around $60-$70 at the time. For me, that was a very good deal, especially when considering the personal value of the garment.
 

mhj

Senior Member
I just had a small moth hole rewoven that was right on the lapel roll of my favorite J. Press. My tailor sent me to a nearby dry cleaner who has a woman that does this work. Cost was $35.00 plus whatever he charged me for dry cleaning the jacket. The results were excellent.
 
Your email address will not be publicly visible. We will only use it to contact you to confirm your post.

IMPORTANT: BEFORE POSTING PLEASE CHECK THE DATE OF THE LAST POST OF THIS THREAD. IF IT'S VERY OLD, PLEASE CONSIDER REGISTERING FIRST, AND STARTING A NEW THREAD ABOUT THIS TOPIC.

Deals/Steals