katon

Super Member

(Pendleton gun clubs circa 1952)

From American Fabrics, 1949:
18. The Coigach


The first of the original Gun-clubs was adopted as the club check of one of the American Gun Clubs in the year 1874. It is like the Shepherd on a white ground, but with alternating checks of black and strong red-brown. The six-threads in the check are just less than a quarter of an inch in the fabric, and the all-over effect is both pleasing and distinctive. While the "gun-club" checks were adopted of use in American Gun Clubs, it should be remembered that the design was created by a Scotch woolen designer whose name has failed to survive that of his great creation.
Gun Club check! More interesting than Shepherd's check, more densely packed than Tattersall, and without the anxieties that occasionally bother folks over wearing tartans. How did they enter the look? Any idea whose gun club it was? :icon_smile_big: Wool only? (Would it turn into a form of gingham in cotton? I'm a little fuzzy over whether gingham is a pattern or a weave...) Anything you wouldn't put the pattern on?
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
Very interesting, thank you. But I'm clueless (common) to offer any detailed answers to your questions, except that if someone were to ask, I'd respond, "Yup, looks like a gun check!" I suspect Jamgood could probably unravel this particular Gordian Knot of history and merchandising.
 

Alexander Kabbaz

Tech and Business Advice Guru
A tattersall of that nature needs the large wool yarns to retain its character. It is not a gingham by any stretch. And IIRC, the name of the company was (is?) The Pendelton Woolen Company. Their products were quite highly regarded, at least domesitcally in the U.S.

Gingham is a pattern of perfectly equal, very well defined squares, often of two colors, sometimes of 3 or 4 woven in a plain weave (see below). Common clothing sizes range from 1/8" to 1/4" squares. The irregularity of the Coigach pattern, created in this instance by the size and number (2) of the colored yarns in each "sort of" square disqualifies it from being in the gingham category as does the diagonal direction of the yarns which is twill-like in nature. However, the pattern of color places it squarely in the tattersall class.

Plain weave:

 
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