blue suede shoes

Super Member
I don't know if I have the right forum for this topic; it probably belongs here or in the grooming forum. Take a look at this article:
https://www.kljb.com/dpps/news/group-perfumes-have-harmful-chemicals-dpgoh-20100513-fc_7514030

The part of this that irritates me most is that companies do not have to disclose the ingredients in their products. I have for quite a while often wondered about what those ingredients may be. As a result, when I use cologne I generally spray it on my clothes, not on my skin. I have used all natural colognes in the past, but I have found that almost no matter how much you put on, the scent is very mild and does not last long.

Do any of you worry about the chemicals in men's colognes or after shaves?

Do any of you use "all natural" or "organic" colognes or after shaves?

Does anyone have any recommendations for all natural colognes?

I look foward to your responses. Thanks.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
I don't know, is cat urine harmful? I've used scent for over 50 years, and aside from all the strange lumps growing all over my body, I've never had a problem.

Seriously, no, it doesn't bother me. I suspect that while there are some who may experience an allergic reaction to particular compounds, I'd be surprised if there weren't far more pernicious substances in our environment to which we're exposed every day.

Creed still formulates its scents from essential oils. Cleaner cat urine?

I'll add that I'd be far more concerned about what's left in your clothes after they come back from the dry cleaner.
 
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DR1V3N

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I don't know, is cat urine harmful? I've used scent for over 50 years, and aside from all the strange lumps growing all over my body, I've never had a problem.

Seriously, no, it doesn't bother me. I suspect that while there are some who may experience an allergic reaction to particular compounds, I'd be surprised if there weren't far more pernicious substances in our environment to which we're exposed every day.

Creed still formulates its scents from essential oils. Cleaner cat urine?

I'll add that I'd be far more concerned about what's left in your clothes after they come back from the dry cleaner.
Can't go wrong with Creed.
 

Thurnau

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Creed is supposed to be all natural where the natural ingredients still exist. A little pricey but they smell good and last long. Give the green irish tweed a smell. Bond no 9 uses the same technology too, I think Laurice learned from Creed if I remember right.
I am concerned with ingredients. I have bought a lot of cologne over the years and some make my throat swell up. A lot of "black" colognes give me problems. Some just give me headaches. I seldom wear anything now, other then green irish tweed deodorant.


I believe Clive Christian is natural too.
 
meh, there's weird stuff in wine too

Do any of you worry about the chemicals in men's colognes or after shaves?
No. It's such a minuscule amount that I could use gasoline and really not fear any health issues.

Do any of you use "all natural" or "organic" colognes or after shaves?
Yeah, sweet almond oil as an aftershave moisturizer. No idea how natural the bay rum and other stuff is.
 
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a tailor

Honors Member
just because its "natural", that does not mean its safe. containers that have previously held peanuts and used for other foods have sickened those allergic to peanuts.
peanuts are natural. we may be allergic to something we have never been exposed to until ....
 

DR1V3N

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
just because its "natural", that does not mean its safe. containers that have previously held peanuts and used for other foods have sickened those allergic to peanuts.
peanuts are natural. we may be allergic to something we have never been exposed to until ....
I'm pretty sure that cologne is tested/regulated by the consumer products safety commission. As you indicate, it might be an allergy.
 

SeptemberSun

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Interesting but I'm not concerned beyond my general allergy problems. I wear cologne on my clothes and do not spray it on my skin.

I guess maybe I should be worried that my BVLGARI is eating its way through my Brooks Brothers shirt!?!
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
I suspect it is a seemingly rare occasion when the ingredients in a cologne/perfume applied to ones skin results in an allergic reaction but, I do know my wife and oldest daughter have exhibited a mild, localized rash when using certain fragrances. I've also noticed when sitting in church, close to a woman or man who has been heavy handed in the application of said substances, I exhibit an almost immediate onset of nasal congestion. I suppose such reactions could be substantially more severe if one were to ingest said products but, by gawd, you would have to really need a drink to go to that extent! ;)
 

VincentC

Senior Member
Interesting but I'm not concerned beyond my general allergy problems. I wear cologne on my clothes and do not spray it on my skin.

I guess maybe I should be worried that my BVLGARI is eating its way through my Brooks Brothers shirt!?!
I have got into the habit of spraying it on my wrist of late. Can it get into the bloodstream?
 

Blueboy1938

Elite Member
One way to ensure that an allergic reaction will not occur is to do a 24 hour test. Dab a little of the prospective product on the inside of the elbow - preferably before purchase - and monitor for a day. No rash = no allergy. That can be used - and should be - any time a new product is considered for use directly on the skin surface. Other effects might occur from long-term use that would not show up in such a test, so it wouldn't hurt to do some research. The International Fragrance Association (IFRA), referenced in the OP's cited article, has a list of ingredients reported as used by its members. There are, as a matter of fact, several types of benzene listed, as well as propane(!), but no cat urine. Unfortunately, it does not match the ingredient with the manufacturer.

There is one precaution that might help avoid excessive exposure to whatever is in cologne, or spray-on deodorants: Avoid breathing mist or droplets directly. The nose, mouth, and lung linings have far higher absorbtance than skin.
 

Thurnau

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I have got into the habit of spraying it on my wrist of late. Can it get into the bloodstream?
I don't think the fragrance is the problem. Acetone, alchohol, and phthalates might be a problem. Phthalates is a chemical in perfume and makeup that holds fragrance or color longer, they are also a key ingredient that makes plastic soft and recently becoming banned in USA and Europe in children's toys. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phthalate

And yes, chemicals do get into the bloodstream via skin exposure.
 

Thurnau

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I don't think that cologne is hazardous. I still wear it, but not as often anymore. I do think that perfume makers should have to display what is in the formula.
 

VincentC

Senior Member
Does anyone know if spraying your clothes has the same results as spraying on the skin?
I cant deny that i havent done it before. But i just dont know if it worked, or is the done thing.
 
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