The Shabby Professor

Starting Member
I'm new here, I apologize if this is the wrong forum. If so, could a mod please direct me to the appropriate place.

Left work today, on the way home, I stopped at the local bookstore. While there, I needed to use the restroom, but after I'd finished my business there, while washing my hands, the liquid soap dispenser decided to ignore my hands and spray all over my silk tie.

It's not an insanely expensive tie (Croft and Barrow, from Kohl's), but I do like it quite a bit. The googling I've done suggests...gasoline?

Any suggestions? It'll be about 15 hours from impact to the dry cleaners being back open, so....I don't know if I need answer fast or not.

Any help would be greatly appreciated, I do like this tie.

-val
 

Langham

Honors Member
I would avoid gasoline.

Others will probably shout me down, but I would just wash the tie by hand in tepid water, then leave it to dry somewhere flat. I've washed one or two silk ties in water, and it doesn't seem to harm them provided you don't wring them out.
 

Shaver

Suspended
Definitely avoid gasoline. People put crap like that on-line to fool the unwary. Try googling for how to fix a waterlogged cell phone - nearly all of the suggestions will kill your phone.

A decent dry-cleaners can bring a tie back to it's former glory, and without flattening the edges. The question is - do you have a decent dry cleaner?
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Given the initial level of investment in the tie concerned, I would opt to just take it to a local dry cleaners. The soap stains will be gone, but any loft in the weave of the fabric from which the tie is made, previously enjoyed, may be lost. Good luck in your quest! ;)
 
I am afraid that the tie will probably never be like it was. Can you post a picture of the tie... As odd as it may seem, I may have an identical one that I will send you as a replacement at no cost. The silk is only part of the problem. If the wool interlining gets saturated it can curl and permanently damage the tie. Or, as Shaver has wisely noted, a non-premium dry cleaner will simply spot treat and iron away any rolled edge the tie may have had. Your tie will be clean but rather stiff and flat.
 

Bohan

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
You can pinch the silk away from the backing and wet just the silk then dab it dry and repeat until the stain is gone. I never tried that, but I did get out a years-old stain from a suit with repeated applications of a drop of boiling water and dabbing.
 

triklops55

Super Member
Just rinse it off with water. I sometimes use hand soap and water to remove something that might have spilled on my tie at a restaurant. The water might stain the silk so you want an even application of water. Simply rinse it off. I've done this with numerousl, expensive ties with no ill effects.
 

The Shabby Professor

Starting Member
Thanks to all for the suggestions. I took another look this morning, and there doesn't seem to be any discoloration. What has happened, however, is that the silk in the areas that the soap hit seems to have lengthened/stretched a little, giving the tie a slightly rumpled appearance.





It's not quite wrecked, but I may take it in to the cleaners. They have a couple of my other ties at the moment, I'll see what they look like when I pick them up, since it's the first time I've had ties cleaned there. Fingers crossed.

-val
 
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