zzdocxx

Honors Member
How Much Coffee/Tea/Caffeinated Beverages Do You Drink?

I realize this is kind of personal, but curious to know how much caffeine you are taking in.

I am not sure we really know the strength in terms of mg caffeine of the coffee they were drinking. The below is for interest:


Top 11 Famous Coffee Drinkers from the History Books
August 26, 2014 by Paul

Pope Clement VIII

“Why, this Satan’s drink is so delicious it would be a pity to let the infidels have exclusive use of it. We shall fool Satan by baptizing it and making it a truly Christian beverage.” –Pope Clement VIII, papacy from 1592-1605
When coffee first made its way to Europe from Arabia, it was considered an evil “non-Christian” drink. Luckily, with Pope Clement VIII’s edict, coffee was deemed acceptable and history was changed forever. It was OK – even encouraged – that early Christians drink coffee.
Coffee quickly caught on. The first coffee houses opened in Vienna in the early 1600s, and first coffee house opened in England in 1652. (Unfortunately, women were prohibited from entering coffeehouses – other than to serve men.)
In addition to tasting good and stimulating the senses, the popularity of coffee could also be attributed to the belief that it had healing properties. In a 1699 article entitled ‘England’s Happiness Improved,’ it was observed that “Moderately drunk, coffee removes vapours from the brain occasioned by fumes of wine or other strong liquors, eases pains in the head, prevents sour belchings and provokes appetite.”
By the 1700s, coffee had become entrenched in European society, and all who could afford it and were allowed to drink it were consuming coffee. Many brewed their own coffee, while others made frequent visits to their local coffee house. The coffee houses became popular places for the exchange of ideas. This made coffee houses particularly popular with the artists, poets, politicians, and aristocrats of the day.
Top 11 Historical Figures With Some Serious Coffee Habits:
#11 Famous Coffee Drinker – Søren Kierkegaard
Søren Kierkegaard, the Danish philosopher, drank a lot of coffee and had a strange way of preparing it. According to the biographer Joakim Garff, Kierkegaard would seize hold of the bag containing the sugar and poured sugar into the coffee cup until it was piled up above the rim. Next came the incredibly strong, black coffee, which slowly dissolved the white pyramid.” Then he gulped the whole thing down in one go.
Søren Kierkegaard

Søren Kierkegaard
#10 Famous Coffee Drinker – Honore de Balzac
Honore de Balzac drank 50 cups of coffee a day. He reportedly woke at 1 a.m. each day and wrote for seven hours. At 8 a.m. he napped for 90 minutes, then wrote again from 9:30 to 4. He is quoted as saying “As soon as coffee is in your stomach, there is a general commotion. Ideas begin to move…similes arise, the paper is covered. Coffee is your ally and writing ceases to be a struggle.”
Honore de Balzac

Honore de Balzac
#9 Famous Coffee Drinker – Louis XV
Louis XV actually grew his own coffee beans in greenhouses on the Versailles Palace grounds. He handpicked the beans, roasted them, and ground them himself. He loved to serve his own coffee to guests of the Palace.
Louis XV

Louis XV
#8 Famous Coffee Drinker – Ronald Reagan
In a great quote from a more modern figure, Ronald Reagan once commented, “I never drink coffee at lunch. I find it keeps me awake for the afternoon.”
Ronald Reagan

Ronald Reagan
#7 Famous Coffee Drinker – Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt allegedly drank a gallon of coffee every day. He was also credit with coining the “Good to the last drop” slogan for Maxwell House Coffee during a visit to the home of former president Andrew Jackson.
Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt
#6 Famous Coffee Drinker – Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson was a noted wine drinker; however, he called coffee his “favorite drink of the civilized world.”
Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson
#5 Famous Coffee Drinker – Benjamin Franklin
Benjamin Franklin has been quoted as saying “Among the numerous luxuries of the table…coffee may be considered as one of the most valuable. It excites cheerfulness without intoxication; and the pleasing flow of spirits which it occasions…is never followed by sadness, languor or debility.”
Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin
#4 Famous Coffee Drinker – Voltaire
Voltaire allegedly drank between 40 and 50 cups a day, which he mixed with chocolate. He credited coffee for the inspiration (and stimulation) behind the development of his philosophies. He paid hefty bonuses to his servants who could find his favorite coffee beans.
Voltaire

Voltaire
#3 Famous Coffee Drinker – Ludwig van Beethoven
Ludwig van Beethoven supposedly drank coffee made with exactly 60 coffee beans – no more; no less. Also, he only drank coffee that he made himself.
Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven
#2 Famous Coffee Drinker – Napoleon Bonaparte
Napoleon Bonaparte asked for a spoonful of coffee while on his deathbed, and his autopsy revealed coffee grounds in his stomach. He is credit with the quote “I would rather suffer with coffee than be senseless.”
Napoleon Bonaparte

Napoleon Bonaparte
#1 Famous Coffee Drinker – Johann Sebastian Bach
Like most musical artists of the time, Johann loved his coffee. Johann Sebastian Bach wrote the the Coffee Cantata, a piece that was a moral treatise on the place of coffee in daily life.
The protagonists of the cantata were a father and his coffee-addicted daughter. The father demands that the daughter give up her coffee habit so that she can get married. She seemingly agrees to do so, but she later decides that she will instead find another coffee addict who will agree to marry her. The cantata ends happily with the father, daughter and narrator all coming together to sing a song expounding on the benefits of coffee drinking.
Johann Sebastian Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach
All photos licensed by wikimediacommons.org
 

Dhaller

Elite Member
I usually have 300ml per day; I use 20g of beans per 300ml water, so that's about 160mg of caffeine.

Some days I have more (if I decide on a "coffee shop office day" for example.)

My one coffee rule is that I don't drink it before 10am, and I don't drink it after 4pm. I have a six hour coffee-drinking window; how much I drink doesn't really matter, as long as I confine the activity.

I always regret deviations from this. Last night, for example, I decided to catch up on some magazine articles at a local hipster coffee joint around 5pm, had a cream cheese brownie and a 12oz cafe au lait, which I nursed until the closed (8pm), and wound up not sleeping until 2:20am.

DH
 

zzdocxx

Honors Member
A footnote to the article I reposted above.

The idea that Napoleon had "coffee grounds" in his stomach is most certainly wrong. He is thought to have died from peptic ulcer and stomach cancer, therefore he would have had blood in the stomach, which when partially digested by stomach acid, takes on the appearance of coffee grounds.

:teacha:
 

ran23

Super Member
I drink about 3 small mugs in the morning, decaf Green Tea in the afternoon. I do not have a problem with Caffeine, I just don't do a lot. I think.
 

Andy

Site Creator/ Administrator
Staff member
When I was working (for real) I got the impression of consuming lots of coffee, but when I analyzed it, I was filling up my cup about 5 times every morning, but only having about 4 sips before the coffee got cold and I went to refill.

Now I have one cup of fairly stong coffee in the morning and that's it. Maybe after dinner at a restaurant I'll have an espresso. I once ordered an espresso at a restaurant and they said they didn't have espresso. I said "just bring out a regular cup of coffee but really fast!" ;)

Plus this weeks medical research thinks coffee is good for you now!
 
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Dhaller

Elite Member
Along with red wine and dark chocolate? Hot damn!
I'll usually have a glass of red wine with dinner (if it makes sense), or a bit after if it didn't work with dinner.

I love dark chocolate, but I'm skeptical of any special health benefits; my feeling is that the chocolate cabal (or whatever) has worked behind the scenes getting dark chocolate accepted as a "superfood". I mean pure cacao, sure, but chocolate? Hmmm. If it's palatable, it's got a LOT of sugar in it!

Eat it for the pleasure, but take its health properties with a grain of salt.

(I'm always tickled at the various "healthy snack bars" loaded with coconut, dark chocolate, oats, etc... they're candy bars! I compared a Snickers to several "health" bars, and they were essentially the same, nutritionally. Fiends!)

DH
 

SG_67

Connoisseur
I'll usually have a glass of red wine with dinner (if it makes sense), or a bit after if it didn't work with dinner.

I love dark chocolate, but I'm skeptical of any special health benefits; my feeling is that the chocolate cabal (or whatever) has worked behind the scenes getting dark chocolate accepted as a "superfood". I mean pure cacao, sure, but chocolate? Hmmm. If it's palatable, it's got a LOT of sugar in it!

Eat it for the pleasure, but take its health properties with a grain of salt.

(I'm always tickled at the various "healthy snack bars" loaded with coconut, dark chocolate, oats, etc... they're candy bars! I compared a Snickers to several "health" bars, and they were essentially the same, nutritionally. Fiends!)

DH

Dark chocolate does contain some valuable nutrients. I wouldn’t necessarily call it a health food or ascribe health benefits to it, but I suppose if someone wants a healthier dessert option, some berries and dark chocolate are a healthier option while still satisfying that craving for something sweet.

As for “sports bars” or whatever, I agree. These are little More than candy bars. The only real difference is that most contain some measure of protein above what is found in a candy bar. The question is whether one can get those proteins by some other means vs. consuming them in conjunction with all of that other crap.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
I like wine and dark chocolate (meh on coffee), but the only health advice I follow concerning those items is the same that I follow with almost all food and drink - enjoy, but have it in moderation.

The "this is good for you / this is bad for you" game has gotten so silly that it's become a running joke in our house in this way: we ask each other when having eggs, "is this a week that eggs are good for us or is it a week in which they are going to kill us?"
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Caffeine is our friend! I generally start my days before 0500 hours, with two 14 oz mugs of Joe (coffee) tempered with a splash (1 oz) of 2% milk. That is followed in the afternoon with two more 14 oz mugs of coffee tempered with splashes of 2% milk. Occasionally additional cups of coffee are added to the mix when we stop at our local eateries while out and about.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Caffeine is our friend! I generally start my days before 0500 hours, with two 14 oz mugs of Joe (coffee) tempered with a splash (1 oz) of 2% milk. That is followed in the afternoon with two more 14 oz mugs of coffee tempered with splashes of 2% milk. Occasionally additional cups of coffee are added to the mix when we stop at our local eateries while out and about.
I probably have ten or so cups of coffee a year, but my girlfriend is more consistent with the rest of America whose day only really starts when the first cup of coffee has been consumed. Being a Sunday and being an early riser, I ran some errands and, then, tried to pick up a large cup of "real" coffee for her on the way back, but Starbucks, Gregorys, Au Bon Pain and a local "coffeehouse" were all closed (it's NYC, so those are all within one block of our apartment), so I hoofed it a few blocks to Dunkin' Donuts (which was reliably open and also provided an excuse to buy a box of six oval-shaped balls of fried dough :) ) where, to my pleasant surprise, they still put the milk in the coffee for you.

Usually, at the "fancier" establishments, I'm left to put my bags on the ground (hopefully) out of the way and not have them stolen as I wait for my space at the serve-yourself milk and condiments bar that is always a bit messy, crowded and not always fully stocked. She likes DD coffee, so I'm left to wonder, why do the more expensive places get away with turning their customers into baristas; whereas, humble DD treats you like a king?
 

TKI67

Elite Member
About five cups a day unless more is available. Rarely after late morning. Often a cafe latte or a cappuccino but also plenty of black pour over or press. I’m on the Oregon coast now, and most of the coffee I am encountering is excellent.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
I probably have ten or so cups of coffee a year, but my girlfriend is more consistent with the rest of America whose day only really starts when the first cup of coffee has been consumed. Being a Sunday and being an early riser, I ran some errands and, then, tried to pick up a large cup of "real" coffee for her on the way back, but Starbucks, Gregorys, Au Bon Pain and a local "coffeehouse" were all closed (it's NYC, so those are all within one block of our apartment), so I hoofed it a few blocks to Dunkin' Donuts (which was reliably open and also provided an excuse to buy a box of six oval-shaped balls of fried dough :) ) where, to my pleasant surprise, they still put the milk in the coffee for you.

Usually, at the "fancier" establishments, I'm left to put my bags on the ground (hopefully) out of the way and not have them stolen as I wait for my space at the serve-yourself milk and condiments bar that is always a bit messy, crowded and not always fully stocked. She likes DD coffee, so I'm left to wonder, why do the more expensive places get away with turning their customers into baristas; whereas, humble DD treats you like a king?
I applaud your girlfriend's good sense and good taste! IMHO Dunkin Donuts and/or McDonald's coffee beats the pants off Starbucks and all those other 'Botique' coffees to be found out in the wilds of our respective communities. When I want what essentially a coffee milkshake, I'll go to Starbucks. Otherwise I'll go to DD or Micky "D's". ;)
 

Howard

Connoisseur
I think I'm a coffee addict, I probably drink about 2-3 cups a day, one with my breakfast after I get up in the morning, before I start work I head over to Burger King for small hash browns and coffee then when I head home, after my shower I drink my final cup along with a small snack.
 

Peak and Pine

Connoisseur
I think I'm a coffee addict, I probably drink about 2-3 cups a day...
If that makes you an addict, then put me in a basket with leather straps because I drink easily 8 to 10 cups a day, often a cup at bedtime and, yes, I sleep lousy, but I don't care considering sleep a waste of time and --- are we in the Interchange here, or close by? --- sleep will be thankfully abolished when we get Liz Warren in there.
 
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