Peak and Pine

Connoisseur
Do elbows wear out from articulation, or from rubbing on stuff, like leaning on a desk? I think the latter, making pads superfluous on a coat. Colors and cut too close to US Marine Corps. Pass.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Do elbows wear out from articulation, or from rubbing on stuff, like leaning on a desk? I think the latter, making pads superfluous on a coat. Colors and cut too close to US Marine Corps. Pass.
LOL, I must have leaned on my desk a lot because I certainly blew through quite a number of elbows on my shirt sleeves, suit and sport jackets; hence my love affair with leather, suede and reinforced elbow patches. ;)
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Lose the tie and the pocket square or put on an OCBD shirt. Tuck in the Rugby shirt or wear it out, but you just can't have it both ways. Get those sleeve cuffs on the jacket attended to. It appears the lining is torn loose and is spilling out around the guys wrist.If this is the best "Prep" can offer, I think I'm glad I haunted our public school system. Hip, hip hooray to the late great Lock Haven High School Bobcats! LOL. ;)
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Lose the tie and the pocket square or put on an OCBD shirt. Tuck in the Rugby shirt or wear it out, but you just can't have it both ways. Get those sleeve cuffs on the jacket attended to. It appears the lining is torn loose and is spilling out around the guys wrist.If this is the best "Prep" can offer, I think I'm glad I haunted our public school system. Hip, hip hooray to the late great Lock Haven High School Bobcats! LOL. ;)
Did he tuck his sweater into his pants? That seems odd. :icon_scratch:
I think, and I credit @eagle2250 with introducing this thought on another pic awhile back, that the Rugby is partially tucked in to show off the belt.

I could get comfortable with the Rugby, jeans and sport coat together, but the rolled up sleeve cuffs, half-tucked Rugby, PS and tie (not even sure what's going on with that) all looks affected.
 

Troones

Senior Member
My green Donegal sport coat (from post #4,716) arrived a few days ago....

jacket 1.jpg


I like it a lot. Its from Spier & Mackay, and makes my third purchase from them. I've yet to be disappointed.

Its an affordable brand, but the value for money is just absolutely incredible. Most of their jackets are Neapolitan styled, and they really get the details right in my opinion. Wide lapels, natural unpadded shoulder, 3/2 roll, Barchetta pocket and even the "Spalla Camicia" sleeve head are all there.

jacket 2.jpg


However, I have a question.... is my new jacket a tweed? If not I guess it doesn't belong in this thread after all.:confused:
I ask because the fabric, as beautiful as it is, is made in Italy (Bottoli) and has a softer hand than your standard tweed, and I've read a few older threads where this was debated. So could this in fact be considered a Donegal tweed, or a tweed at all for that matter?

Not that it will impact my enjoyment of the jacket. Its just that it if anyone ever compliments me on it, I'd like to be able to say:

"Oh thanks! It's a Donegal tweed"

instead of:

"Oh thanks! Its made to resemble a Donegal tweed though its not really. Sit down and I'll explain what factors prevent it from being considered a true tweed."

I'd love to hear some opinions on this.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
My green Donegal sport coat (from post #4,716) arrived a few days ago....

View attachment 49493

I like it a lot. Its from Spier & Mackay, and makes my third purchase from them. I've yet to be disappointed.

Its an affordable brand, but the value for money is just absolutely incredible. Most of their jackets are Neapolitan styled, and they really get the details right in my opinion. Wide lapels, natural unpadded shoulder, 3/2 roll, Barchetta pocket and even the "Spalla Camicia" sleeve head are all there.

View attachment 49495

However, I have a question.... is my new jacket a tweed? If not I guess it doesn't belong in this thread after all.:confused:
I ask because the fabric, as beautiful as it is, is made in Italy (Bottoli) and has a softer hand than your standard tweed, and I've read a few older threads where this was debated. So could this in fact be considered a Donegal tweed, or a tweed at all for that matter?

Not that it will impact my enjoyment of the jacket. Its just that it if anyone ever compliments me on it, I'd like to be able to say:

"Oh thanks! It's a Donegal tweed"

instead of:

"Oh thanks! Its made to resemble a Donegal tweed though its not really. Sit down and I'll explain what factors prevent it from being considered a true tweed."

I'd love to hear some opinions on this.
First, that is a beautiful sport coat - enjoy and wear it in good health.

I love that it appears to be only partially lined, which, IMO, is good for a jacket like this as it it plenty warm without adding in a full lining.

As to Tweed, others are simply more knowledgeable than I, but my understanding is that, today, Tweed is a reasonably generic term for a rough finished and heavy wool material.

It has a history that is narrower than that, but today, we kinda use it to cover a wide swath of material that, again, are rough/heavy wools. (I've even seen other materials - cotton and silk - with a rough finishes described as Tweed, but that seems like a stretch to me.)

Harris and Donegal Tweeds are legal terms that apply to Tweeds made in a certain way from a certain part of Ireland.

So, unless your label says Harris or Donegal, I'd say what you have is a "generic" Tweed jacket. And a quite handsome one at that.

Last point, all the above is my not-professional opinion - I'm happy to be corrected by others.


Edit add: As to this thread, like with many threads, they drift and are pretty loosely defined. Pretty much, any rough / heavy wool material makes the cut for us to discuss in this thread.
 

Troones

Senior Member
First, that is a beautiful sport coat - enjoy and wear it in good health.

I love that it appears to be only partially lined, which, IMO, is good for a jacket like this as it it plenty warm without adding in a full lining.

As to Tweed, others are simply more knowledgeable than I, but my understanding is that, today, Tweed is a reasonably generic term for a rough finished and heavy wool material.

It has a history that is narrower than that, but today, we kinda use it to cover a wide swath of material that, again, are rough/heavy wools. (I've even seen other materials - cotton and silk - with a rough finishes described as Tweed, but that seems like a stretch to me.)

Harris and Donegal Tweeds are legal terms that apply to Tweeds made in a certain way from a certain part of Ireland.

So, unless your label says Harris or Donegal, I'd say what you have is a "generic" Tweed jacket. And a quite handsome one at that.

Last point, all the above is my not-professional opinion - I'm happy to be corrected by others.


Edit add: As to this thread, like with many threads, they drift and are pretty loosely defined. Pretty much, any rough / heavy wool material makes the cut for us to discuss in this thread.
Very succinct, thanks for the info. I knew that Harris tweed was a legal term and I have a couple of Harris tweeds, but I didn't realize the same was true for Donegal. Silly me, as my Mother was born not in, but very very close to County Donegal!
 
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