TKI67

Super Member
The warehouse sale sounded too good to be true. The flannel 3/2 blazer is MIC! Wow. Just wow. A $99 gamble that did not pay off.
 
G

Guest-908222

Guest
Does it fit?

Wear it.

J.Press has had some Chinese-made stuff for at least the last 10-15 years, and it's usually a better shoulder than anything made in Canada.
 

TKI67

Super Member
Irish? Drunken teenager?

Display of prejudice against an entire nation?
No, actually I have a great deal of respect for the Chinese. However, Press has historically hewn to MIUSA and occasionally Canadian goods (plus certain UK woolens). That has been important to many. That they now offer wares from China puts them, in some ways, in a place where there is less to differentiate them. If I had wanted a $99 blazer made in China there options beyond Press.

If you choose to call me a drunken teenager, what are you seeking to accomplish? If you think calling someone Irish is derogatory, I am indeed of Irish heritage in part. I guess you think that makes me somehow inferior.

So long, whoever you are.
 

Eligius

New Member
J Press is owned by Onward Kashiyama, whose factory is in China. I have a Press labeled 3/2 MIC sack blazer (Blue label at the time) which is outstanding and much better than the other MIC (Canada - S Cohen) blazer I bought shortly beforehand which was a major supplier of their jackets for several years. Attaching a post from those wiser that me which summarizes it well:

 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
The warehouse sale sounded too good to be true. The flannel 3/2 blazer is MIC! Wow. Just wow. A $99 gamble that did not pay off.
Independent of the country it was made - and I respect that some try to only buy American-made goods for various reasons - what do you think of the blazer vs other not-MIC Press blazers that you're familiar with?

Also, what do you think of it for $99 - is it good value at that price? What was the full price of it? What do you think of it at that full price - is it reasonable value at full price?
 

Lawschooled

Starting Member
This is easy to explain: You probably bought something from the japanese J. Press inventory.

J. Press USA belongs to the japanese company Onward Kashiyama, but they carry their own inventory. The japanese inventory is mostly made in Asia specifically for that market and sold under the J. Press label as a shopping mall brand similar to Brooks in the USA.
Sometimes inventory from Japan finds its way to the US and is frequently sold off during their warehouse sales. You can spot it rather easily by the different label styles.
 

drpeter

Super Member
I think quality of product and country of manufacture are complex questions that each of us must evaluate using our own guidelines. And we must also keep in mind that one way of ensuring high quality in any product is to vote with our purchasing dollars (or yen, or rupees, or euros). I realize, though, that this may not work too well because a lot of people do not care about quality in clothes, they would rather buy cheaply and replace when the product falls apart.

Personally, I would have no problems buying electronic devices (cameras, computers, etc.) from China, Japan or South Korea. I would definitely have problems buying clothes or shoes from China because I have bought such products and found them defective in the past. That is not to say that I will not buy them in the future. I keep an eye on such products, and if I think they are better, I will try them out again.

My old country, India, is a mixed bag when it comes to clothes. Sometimes you get good pieces, sometimes they are poorly made. There are also pricier outfits like Hundred Hands which make outstanding shirts, from what I hear -- one of these days, I will have to order a shirt from them. Shoes are a better bet because India has long had a shoe manufacturing tradition, similar to Brazil in this respect.

Indonesia is another country that has definitely improved its shoes and their quality has been praised in forums like Shoegazing. Years ago, I had bespoke leather sandals and shoes made in India by a skilled cordwainer. They were remarkable for the quality and even more so for the price.

An inexpensive way to test products from various countries is to buy them second-hand in thrift shops and see how you like them. A blazer or topcoat picked up for a few dollars is not exactly investment buying, LOL.
 

rl1856

Senior Member
MiUSA means US workers are employed in the manufacture of the item. This distinction is important to some people. Pointing to a country of origin does not imply criticism, only statement of fact. I saw nothing in the original post that implied the item was inferior, only that the item did not fit. Everyone seems to be on a knife edge regarding any topic that could involve politics. It can be a slippery slope if an innocuous comment is made, then taken the wrong way, and is blown out of proportion.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Well, one can be critical of products made in any country if the product is of poor quality. Likewise, if the quality improves one can praise those products as well. People were very critical of Japanese electronics in the fifties, but things changed by the seventies! I thought one of the points of having a forum such as AAAC was to discuss clothes of various types, made by various manufacturers in different countries, in a reasonable and analytic fashion.

I believe one of the key factors in all of this is what companies are willing to pay the workers who make the products and their willingness to provide the kind of detailed training necessary to make a product that fits the standards of the company. Here's an example:

Some years ago, a Savile Row tailor set up a tailoring unit in India, recruited good tailors and worked with them to show them what he expected in the finished clothes they produced. The quality was excellent, the venture was quite successful, and the clothes could be sold at an intermediate price point that was less than that of clothes made in Britain.

Another example is the Whitcombe and Shaftesbury tailors in Madras/Chennai, set up by two Indian brothers who were businessmen in the US and decided to move into the clothes business. They trained their tailors to make high quality clothes, although their retail prices are probably quite high.
 

Steve Smith

Super Member
This is easy to explain: You probably bought something from the japanese J. Press inventory.

J. Press USA belongs to the japanese company Onward Kashiyama, but they carry their own inventory. The japanese inventory is mostly made in Asia specifically for that market and sold under the J. Press label as a shopping mall brand similar to Brooks in the USA.
Sometimes inventory from Japan finds its way to the US and is frequently sold off during their warehouse sales. You can spot it rather easily by the different label styles.

This is interesting information. FWIW I would like to add that until the recent closing of the Brooks Brothers Garland, North Carolina shirt factory, some J. Press Asian-market OCBDs were being manufactured by Brooks Brothers in the US.
 

August West

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
The warehouse sale sounded too good to be true. The flannel 3/2 blazer is MIC! Wow. Just wow. A $99 gamble that did not pay off.
Even though the warehouse sale terms state "final sale", in the past I have been able to return items for store credit. If you are unhappy with the suit, you may want to consider reaching out to customer service to enquire.
 

Dhaller

Advanced Member
My wife - before she got into the higher-flying world of private equity - used to negotiate manufacturing contracts with Chinese manufacturers for Japanese companies.

This was a lot of yelling, international flights, and teeth-pulling, but eventually, the manufacturer would be brought inline with Japanese manufacturing standards (mostly because failure cost the Chinese manufacturer a lot of money in lost production runs.)

The key phrase here is *Japanese company*. NO ONE, and I mean NO ONE, is as institutionally OCD as a Japanese company, and their manufacturing standards are crazy... and they will NOT compromise with a vendor or manufacturer, ever. Remember, these are people famous for ending their lives as a consequence of personal failure, and they are *tenacious* when it comes to getting the job done.

So - J Press being, now, Japanese - I do have some faith in their management of garment quality on the Chinese side!

DH
 

drpeter

Super Member
I can imagine the head (pun intended) of a Japanese company and his principal executives all sitting like the 47 ronin in a field, with the knives and rice paper laid out in front of them, and a second or kaishaku with a sword standing beside them, ready to behead them after the ritual seppuku. And all because a Chinese manufacturer made sport coats that were not up to their standards. Yes, it would be taking things to an extreme...Shades of Belushi's "Samurai Optometrist" etc.
 

rl1856

Senior Member
My wife - before she got into the higher-flying world of private equity - used to negotiate manufacturing contracts with Chinese manufacturers for Japanese companies.

This was a lot of yelling, international flights, and teeth-pulling, but eventually, the manufacturer would be brought inline with Japanese manufacturing standards (mostly because failure cost the Chinese manufacturer a lot of money in lost production runs.)

The key phrase here is *Japanese company*. NO ONE, and I mean NO ONE, is as institutionally OCD as a Japanese company, and their manufacturing standards are crazy... and they will NOT compromise with a vendor or manufacturer, ever. Remember, these are people famous for ending their lives as a consequence of personal failure, and they are *tenacious* when it comes to getting the job done.

So - J Press being, now, Japanese - I do have some faith in their management of garment quality on the Chinese side!

DH

Chinese companies are notorious for delivering what they think the client will accept, rather than what was specified in the contract. Successful Western companies eventually realized they needed people on the ground in China to ensure that standards were upheld, and inventory did not disappear out the back door.
 

Dhaller

Advanced Member
Chinese companies are notorious for delivering what they think the client will accept, rather than what was specified in the contract. Successful Western companies eventually realized they needed people on the ground in China to ensure that standards were upheld, and inventory did not disappear out the back door.
Dealing with them is definitely a skillset.

But of course when it works, you definitely save a lot on manufacturing costs.

DH
 
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