Charles Dana

Honors Member
PART I—OVERVIEW

I hope they lived long enough to realize how correct they were.

In the September 29, 1898 edition of Vogue magazine (which at that time covered both men’s and women’s fashions), an anonymous writer stated in reference to the just-concluded Spanish-American War: “Still we are all now in a whirl of self-glorification, and we have almost forgotten that there has been a war. We are only reminded of it by the monthly magazines which have laid in a prodigious stock of war material. I am also glad that this episode in our history has been the means of introducing khaki, which may prove invaluable for summer country clothes.“

Another writer (also un-named) had this to say in the San Francisco Chronicle for January 15, 1899: “The war gave rise to a number of words which will undoubtedly find their way into the dictionary....The uniforms of an important part of the United States Army will be made of khaki cloth from now on, and the word will undoubtedly become a part of the language.”

Those writers may have been on to something, you think? According to an article in the Los Angeles Times for June 15, 1924, “[m]ore than $106,000,000 worth of cotton goods are consumed annually in the 11 Western States, comprising the logical marketing territory of Los Angeles....One hundred million yards of khaki, 75,000,000 yards of gingham and 20,000,000 yards of corduroy alone are purchased in this territory. The mild climate encourages the use of ginghams, and the many opportunities for riding and hiking in the mountains have created a heavy demand for khaki and corduroys....Coupled with this excellent marketing area, Los Angeles offers to cotton manufacturers economy in distribution and factory construction costs, as well as proximity to the cotton-growing area of the Pacific Southwest.”

Far from being the everyday trousers that we know and love today, khakis during the first four decades of the 20th Century were marketed to civilians as rugged clothing for rugged people (or people who thought they were rugged, if only on the weekends). Khakis were for “outings”—camping, fishing, “motoring,” hiking (on the beach, in the mountains—or anywhere a hike could be had). They were for farmers, field hands, factory workers and mechanics. So that retailers could cover all the bases, khaki clothes—shirts as well as trousers—were also heavily promoted as outing attire for women, girls, and boys.

In Part II, I will discuss in detail the first ways in which khaki garments were marketed on a widespread basis to the civilian market. (Hint—clothing retailers took full advantage of the enormous celebrity of the Rough Riders and their beloved, khaki-clad leader, Theodore Roosevelt.)
 
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drpeter

Senior Member
Thanks, Charles, for the first installment of information from your research on khaki. As a long-time regular khaki user, I find this all very interesting, and look forward to the next installment.
 

TKI67

Super Member
Thank you so much for the work and the insights. While I would wear pressed khakis to work (when I worked) because they were so fitting for business casual, now that I am no longer cnstrained by that convention I like unironed khakis as the trousers of choice for outdoor activities. I find them superior in every way to jeans.
 

Charles Dana

Honors Member
PART II—THE BEGINNING: SELLING AND WEARING KHAKI GARMENTS IN THE CIVILIAN SECTOR, 1899–1909

The Rough Riders who served under Col. Theodore Roosevelt in Cuba during the 1898 Spanish-American war didn’t have to wait decades to become famous. They were celebrities even before they returned from Cuba. The Rough Riders who stood by in Florida—they were the “detachments,” never having been called upon to fight in Cuba—were celebrated as well. All of these soldiers were a big deal as of August 1898, when they slowly made their way to Camp Wikoff in Montauk Point, Long Island for rest and recuperation—and quarantine, because a lot of them were sick from yellow fever or malaria and the general ravages of war. (War is war, no matter how famous you get by participating in it.) Newspapers all over the country reported the Rough Riders’ every move and, briefly, what they were wearing.

From the August 8, 1898 edition of the Los Angeles Times:

“The First Regiment Cavalry and the First Volunteer Cavalry, Rough Riders, will sail away [from Santiago, Cuba] on the transports Miami and Mattewan....The Rough Riders came to [Santiago] by rail from their camp....At the station they fell into line....Col. Roosevelt rode at the head of the regiment...to the dock where the Miami was moored. All the men looked fit but worn out. They presented a picturesque appearance. Some wore new khaki uniforms, while others were attired in heavy blue flannel shirts, with their old equipment.”

(The Wikipedia article on the Rough Riders quotes Theodore Roosevelt’s book “The Rough Riders”: Their “uniform was a slouch hat, blue flannel shirt, brown trousers, leggings, and boots, with handkerchiefs knotted loosely around their necks.” Even so, the full khaki uniform was the clothing that the Rough Riders—and especially Teddy Roosevelt—became most closely associated with in the popular mind.)

From the Los Angeles Times for August 15, 1898: “The Rough Riders are home....[T]hey have reached Montauk Point....Col. Roosevelt had on a faded khaki uniform, much stained and discolored, but there was a wholesome bronze on his face and hands, and if he lost some flesh since he went away, he is not any the worse for it.”

The press also reported on the detachments of Rough Riders coming to Montauk from Tampa. From the New York Times for August 11, 1898:

“Col. Roosevelt’s Rough Riders, in military parlance the First United States Volunteer Cavalry—that is, those of the command who were left in Tampa when their more fortunate comrades went to fight in Cuba—arrived in Jersey City last night....All of the boys were clad in the brown canvas khaki uniforms, and a finer looking lot of fellows never bore arms for Uncle Sam....”

And people paid attention to the long newspaper articles that detailed each phase of the Rough Riders’ homecoming. From the New York Times dated August 16, 1898:

“The 680 Rough Riders who arrived here [in Montauk] yesterday from Santiago on the transport Miami disembarked at the Iron Pier...and the reception they met was almost sufficient to recompense them for the many sufferings they had undergone. Unlike the other troops, whose landing was effected in the presence of an admiring but silent crowd, tumultuous cheering, loud shouts of ‘Welcome home!’ and words of encouragement greeted the returning troopers.”

******

Flash forward nine months. It is now May 22, 1899. You reside in or near Spokane, Washington. You page through the Spokane Daily Chronicle and happen upon this advertisement from the I.X.L. Clothing Company:

“Boys’ Rough Rider Suits
“$1.50
“An exact reproduction of the famous uniform. Every detail identical to original garment worn by Roosevelt’s Rough Riders. Made of the famous Khaki cloth—wears like iron. Rough Rider Hat to match. Long and short pants, ages 3 to 12....”

Coming up in Part III—More early advertisements (from 1899 through 1909) for khaki clothing
 
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Peak and Pine

Connoisseur
Will there be a quiz? I've been boning up, if you'll pardon the expression.

This being the internet I cannot throw flaming toilet paper rolls at Charles as I used to do when in an actual classroom, but the thought still itches. I, along with others here, appreciate the work that's gone into this research (my own efforts pale, tho in a different direction, am getting closer to formulating an effective vaccine). Looking forward to more khaki info, sincerely so, and to far less info on dessert, breakfast, red meat, antipasto, pizza, libations and assorted other heart attack inducing non clothing never ending threads.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
Will there be a quiz? I've been boning up, if you'll pardon the expression.

This being the internet I cannot throw flaming toilet paper rolls at Charles as I used to do when in an actual classroom, but the thought still itches. I, along with others here, appreciate the work that's gone into this research (my own efforts pale, tho in a different direction, am getting closer to formulating an effective vaccine). Looking forward to more khaki info, sincerely so, and to far less info on dessert, breakfast, red meat, antipasto, pizza, libations and assorted other heart attack inducing non clothing never ending threads.
Uh oh. I just posted a description of my Sunday lunch in that other infamous long-running thread on Red Meat. But meatless. Home made tomato bisque and a grilled cheese sandwich. I hope I may be forgiven for indulging in this non-clothing food obsession, especially since a very modest amount of bisque and cheese will probably not induce heart attacks, and hot sauce protects against everything.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
PART II—THE BEGINNING: SELLING AND WEARING KHAKI GARMENTS IN THE CIVILIAN SECTOR, 1899–1909

The Rough Riders who served under Col. Theodore Roosevelt in Cuba during the 1898 Spanish-American war didn’t have to wait decades to become famous. They were celebrities even before they returned from Cuba. The Rough Riders who stood by in Florida—they were the “detachments,” never having been called upon to fight in Cuba—were celebrated as well. All of these soldiers were a big deal as of August 1898, when they slowly made their way to Camp Wikoff in Montauk Point, Long Island for rest and recuperation—and quarantine, because a lot of them were sick from yellow fever or malaria and the general ravages of war. (War is war, no matter how famous you get by participating in it.) Newspapers all over the country reported the Rough Riders’ every move and, briefly, what they were wearing.

From the August 8, 1898 edition of the Los Angeles Times:

“The First Regiment Cavalry and the First Volunteer Cavalry, Rough Riders, will sail away [from Santiago, Cuba] on the transports Miami and Mattewan....The Rough Riders came to [Santiago] by rail from their camp....At the station they fell into line....Col. Roosevelt rode at the head of the regiment...to the dock where the Miami was moored. All the men looked fit but worn out. They presented a picturesque appearance. Some wore new khaki uniforms, while others were attired in heavy blue flannel shirts, with their old equipment.”

(The Wikipedia article on the Rough Riders quotes Theodore Roosevelt’s book “The Rough Riders”: Their “uniform was a slouch hat, blue flannel shirt, brown trousers, leggings, and boots, with handkerchiefs knotted loosely around their necks.” Even so, the full khaki uniform was the clothing that the Rough Riders—and especially Teddy Roosevelt—became most closely associated with in the popular mind.)

From the Los Angeles Times for August 15, 1898: “The Rough Riders are home....[T]hey have reached Montauk Point....Col. Roosevelt had on a faded khaki uniform, much stained and discolored, but there was a wholesome bronze on his face and hands, and if he lost some flesh since he went away, he is not any the worse for it.”

The press also reported on the detachments of Rough Riders coming to Montauk from Tampa. From the New York Times for August 11, 1898:

“Col. Roosevelt’s Rough Riders, in military parlance the First United States Volunteer Cavalry—that is, those of the command who were left in Tampa when their more fortunate comrades went to fight in Cuba—arrived in Jersey City last night....All of the boys were clad in the brown canvas khaki uniforms, and a finer looking lot of fellows never bore arms for Uncle Sam....”

And people paid attention to the long newspaper articles that detailed each phase of the Rough Riders’ homecoming. From the New York Times dated August 16, 1898:

“The 680 Rough Riders who arrived here [in Montauk] yesterday from Santiago on the transport Miami disembarked at the Iron Pier...and the reception they met was almost sufficient to recompense them for the many sufferings they had undergone. Unlike the other troops, whose landing was effected in the presence of an admiring but silent crowd, tumultuous cheering, loud shouts of ‘Welcome home!’ and words of encouragement greeted the returning troopers.”

******

Flash forward nine months. It is now May 22, 1899. You reside in or near Spokane, Washington. You page through the Spokane Daily Chronicle and happen upon this advertisement from the I.X.L. Clothing Company:

“Boys’ Rough Rider Suits
“$1.50
“An exact reproduction of the famous uniform. Every detail identical to original garment worn by Roosevelt’s Rough Riders. Made of the famous Khaki cloth—wears like iron. Rough Rider Hat to match. Long and short pants, ages 3 to 12....”

Coming up in Part III—More early advertisements (from 1899 through 1909) for khaki clothing
Splendid stuff. Perhaps when all the installments are in, you can collect them together into a single folder and place it in a convenient location, like a sticky.
 

Charles Dana

Honors Member
Will there be a quiz? I've been boning up, if you'll pardon the expression.

This being the internet I cannot throw flaming toilet paper rolls at Charles as I used to do when in an actual classroom, but the thought still itches. I, along with others here, appreciate the work that's gone into this research
Thank you for the encouragement. And no—there won’t be a quiz for you. It wouldn’t be sporting of me to give you one, inasmuch as you are resisting the temptation to lob flaming rolls of toilet paper at me. (Though I will gladly accept non-ignited rolls.)
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Just received an email from the clothing company Alex Mills.

It's a pretty new company that describes itself this way:

Timeless, not trendy, we take the core styles that every person wants and we do something radical: We don’t change them all that much.
We preserve what makes them iconic so you can stop searching for that perfect, uncomplicated jacket or shirt. It’s right here.
Wake up, get dressed, don’t overthink it. (Sounds nice, right?)
Alex Mill: Guaranteed to never go out of style.


Why I posted it here is because the email's subject line read:

"The Best Things In Life Are Khaki"

Followed by a series of pics of a man and woman in all-khaki outfits:
unnamed-29.jpg
unnamed-25.jpg
unnamed-26.jpg
unnamed-27.jpg
unnamed-23.jpg


So here we are, 122 years after it started, and Khaki still seems to have currency even with some part of the young generation.

That's it, thought it was relevant enough to @Charles Dana outstanding thread to post.
 
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eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
PART II—THE BEGINNING: SELLING AND WEARING KHAKI GARMENTS IN THE CIVILIAN SECTOR, 1899–1909

The Rough Riders who served under Col. Theodore Roosevelt in Cuba during the 1898 Spanish-American war didn’t have to wait decades to become famous. They were celebrities even before they returned from Cuba. The Rough Riders who stood by in Florida—they were the “detachments,” never having been called upon to fight in Cuba—were celebrated as well. All of these soldiers were a big deal as of August 1898, when they slowly made their way to Camp Wikoff in Montauk Point, Long Island for rest and recuperation—and quarantine, because a lot of them were sick from yellow fever or malaria and the general ravages of war. (War is war, no matter how famous you get by participating in it.) Newspapers all over the country reported the Rough Riders’ every move and, briefly, what they were wearing.

From the August 8, 1898 edition of the Los Angeles Times:

“The First Regiment Cavalry and the First Volunteer Cavalry, Rough Riders, will sail away [from Santiago, Cuba] on the transports Miami and Mattewan....The Rough Riders came to [Santiago] by rail from their camp....At the station they fell into line....Col. Roosevelt rode at the head of the regiment...to the dock where the Miami was moored. All the men looked fit but worn out. They presented a picturesque appearance. Some wore new khaki uniforms, while others were attired in heavy blue flannel shirts, with their old equipment.”

(The Wikipedia article on the Rough Riders quotes Theodore Roosevelt’s book “The Rough Riders”: Their “uniform was a slouch hat, blue flannel shirt, brown trousers, leggings, and boots, with handkerchiefs knotted loosely around their necks.” Even so, the full khaki uniform was the clothing that the Rough Riders—and especially Teddy Roosevelt—became most closely associated with in the popular mind.)

From the Los Angeles Times for August 15, 1898: “The Rough Riders are home....[T]hey have reached Montauk Point....Col. Roosevelt had on a faded khaki uniform, much stained and discolored, but there was a wholesome bronze on his face and hands, and if he lost some flesh since he went away, he is not any the worse for it.”

The press also reported on the detachments of Rough Riders coming to Montauk from Tampa. From the New York Times for August 11, 1898:

“Col. Roosevelt’s Rough Riders, in military parlance the First United States Volunteer Cavalry—that is, those of the command who were left in Tampa when their more fortunate comrades went to fight in Cuba—arrived in Jersey City last night....All of the boys were clad in the brown canvas khaki uniforms, and a finer looking lot of fellows never bore arms for Uncle Sam....”

And people paid attention to the long newspaper articles that detailed each phase of the Rough Riders’ homecoming. From the New York Times dated August 16, 1898:

“The 680 Rough Riders who arrived here [in Montauk] yesterday from Santiago on the transport Miami disembarked at the Iron Pier...and the reception they met was almost sufficient to recompense them for the many sufferings they had undergone. Unlike the other troops, whose landing was effected in the presence of an admiring but silent crowd, tumultuous cheering, loud shouts of ‘Welcome home!’ and words of encouragement greeted the returning troopers.”

******

Flash forward nine months. It is now May 22, 1899. You reside in or near Spokane, Washington. You page through the Spokane Daily Chronicle and happen upon this advertisement from the I.X.L. Clothing Company:

“Boys’ Rough Rider Suits
“$1.50
“An exact reproduction of the famous uniform. Every detail identical to original garment worn by Roosevelt’s Rough Riders. Made of the famous Khaki cloth—wears like iron. Rough Rider Hat to match. Long and short pants, ages 3 to 12....”

Coming up in Part III—More early advertisements (from 1899 through 1909) for khaki clothing
Charles Dana, the value of your contributions to these communities/conversations, cannot be overstated. You are one of the 'Master Teachers' in these parts. Thank you for that. ;)
 

Charles Dana

Honors Member
(Fading Fast—Funny you should add a post today about a new iteration of khaki suits. When I saw your contribution, I was in the process of firming up the following section. Coincidentally, you’ll see that it includes quotes from a few of the earliest advertisements ever for full khaki suits.)

*****

PART III—FROM BOYS’ PLAY SUITS TO GARMENTS FOR
MEN & WOMEN—CIVILIAN KHAKI GROWS UP
1899 THROUGH 1909

Khaki’s popularity in the civilian world was spawned by the 1898 Spanish-American war. Knowing a business opportunity when they saw one, America’s enterprising clothing retailers quickly began marketing boys’ play suits modeled after the khaki uniform that the Rough Riders—and most notably their leader, Teddy Roosevelt—made famous during and shortly after their return from Cuba.

I’m going to go a bit deep in the weeds with this part of the thread, so be warned. I will provide specifics so that you’ll be able to see for yourselves how khaki attire evolved from boys’ clothing at the turn of the 20th Century to heavy-duty clothes for men and “outing” attire for women by 1909. In this section, I’ll quote a representative sampling of newspaper advertisements from 1899 through 1909. Some of the information is repetitious, but that’s a deliberate choice I have made; I want to give you a flavor of how popular the boys’ version of the khaki Rough Rider uniform was during the few years following the Spanish-American war. (Anyway, this topic—civilian khakiwear in the very early 1900s—hasn’t been written about much—if at all—as far as I can tell, so we might as well shine what light we can on the subject.)

From the Los Angeles Times for May 23, 1899:

A Los Angeles store called the London Clothing Company advertised this new product—

“Boys’ Rough Rider Suits, another new lot just received. Made of the same material and in the same style as worn by ‘Teddy’s Terrors,’ trimmed with blue, red or yellow; very durable and just the thing to tickle a live American boy. “$1.50 a Suit.”

*****

From the San Francisco Chronicle for May 28, 1899:

“Roosevelt Rough Rider Suits, $1.45–Rough Rider Suits...for rough times during vacation; made of genuine Khaki cloth; serviceable and strong; just the thing for the little fellow’s outing; sizes 4 to 10 years; prices $1.45 either Infantry, Cavalry or Artillery trimmings, an exact counterpart of the uniform worn by Roosevelt’s Rough Riders.”

*****

In the Spokane Chronicle dated June 1, 1899:

Another advertisement by the I.X.L. Clothing Co., which reads:

“Boys’ Rough Rider Suits“
“Ages 3 to 10 years. Consist of jacket and long pants. Made of the regular tan khaki cloth. Same as worn in Cuba during the Spanish-American war. We place three hundred of these suits on sale tomorrow only at $1.45.
25 Dozen Rough Rider Hats for tomorrow only.....20¢“

*****

And now for something completely different—khaki attire for the ladies. The Los Angeles Times for June 21, 1900 carried an ad from a local clothing store, the New York Skirt Company. It was having a big sale. Among other items on offer were these beauties:

“Seaside Suits“
“Choice of any Wash Suit in the house this week only $2.37
These garments are the very newest...of this season’s styles. Suits are made of khaki cloth, shrunk linen, pique, duck, linen, homespun, covert, Barnsley suiting, etc.“

*****

And now, the earliest ad for a men’s khaki suit that I could find (not necessarily the earliest, just the earliest I stumbled upon):

In a suburb of Los Angeles, the Covina Argus newspaper for September 28, 1901 carried an ad from a clothier:

“Khaki Suits”
“We have just received our second shipment of suits made from the Tan Khaki Cloth. They will wear far longer than anything you can buy at anywhere near the price. Extra well made, perfect fit. COAT, PANTS AND SHIRT AT $4.00.”

*****

Another ad for khaki suits for men—

The Bakersfield Daily Californian, May 31, 1902:

Hochheimer & Co. offers

“Men’s Khaki Suits, $3.50”
“Comfortable, sensible, durable suits for summer. These suits are made from the regulation army Khaki that Uncle Sam uses for his fighting men....Pants alone cost $1.45.”

*****

San Francisco Examiner, May 9, 1902:

“Rough Rider suits for boys, made of U.S. Government standard khaki cut like soldier’s suits with red or blue trimmings; ages 3 to 12 years; price, $1.25 a suit.”

*****

San Francisco Examiner for June 6, 1902:

“Vacation clothes for boys“
“School ends this week—the boy will be wanting to go on his vacation next. Get him the proper togs....We mention a few articles that will be of interest to the mother who wants to dress her boy properly and profitably. Rough Rider suits...made from U.S. Government khaki
first-class material, suits are made in the regulation rough rider uniform style, with long pants, neatly trimmed with red or blue; ages 3 to 12 years; excellent wearing goods—will wear the boy through the entire vacation; price but
$1.25 a suit.”

*****

San Francisco Examiner, July 5, 1903:

A store advertised a “Clothing Drive for Men”:

“The outing season we have had in mind and the garments shown here are particularly appropriate for this season of the year. They are all the newest summer weaves and colors....KHAKI CLOTHING $1.50 Coat, also trousers made of U.S. Khaki cloth.”

The year 1903 may have been a transitional period, for while the “outing suits” that this retailer had in stock were still made of all-wool flannel ($6.95), the store did have the following wares:

“KHAKI CLOTHING”
“$1.50–Coat, also trousers made of U.S. Khaki cloth. Well tailored.”
“$2.50–Norfolk coat of U.S. Khaki cloth”

*****

The August 15, 1903 edition of the San Francisco Examiner contained an ad for the “Famous Rough Rider Suspenders.” On sale for 25¢.

*****
From the May 8, 1904, SF Examiner:

“Rough Rider Suits $1.45”
“These are the genuine Rough Rider Suits for boys from 5 to 14 years of age, They were made to our order from the regulation khaki cloth and are facsimiles of the Roosevelt Rough Rider Suits. They are wholly unlike the so-called Rough Rider Suits that are offered at lower prices, as you will find upon inspection.”

*****

And back to the men’s suits—

SF Examiner, June 1, 1904:

“MEN’S KHAKI SUITS”
“MADE OF UNITED STATES STANDARD ARMY KHAKI”
“A SUIT $2.50”

*****

The October 7, 1906, Examiner:

A hardware store in San Francisco, fittingly enough, announced that “Duck Season Opens October 15th.” In addition to selling shotguns and cartridges, the store naturally sold “The Sundries” related to that activity: “Shotgun Cases, Decoys, Duck Calls, Duck Straps, Cartridge Bags, Shell Cases, Hunting clothing in khaki, corduroy and Duck, Hunting Shoes and Rubber Boots.”

*****

Levi Strauss & Co. states in its website that it “introduced khakis into its line as early as 1905.” By the spring of 1907, that San Francisco-based company was regularly running classified ads in the San Francisco Examiner for “KHAKI pants operators; steady work....Apply to Mr. Hindshaw.”

(An “operator” in the lingo of garment factories back then meant a sewing machine operator.)

*****

The Emporium was a venerable department store in San Francisco that went out of business around 1996. I bought a suit and a lot of Dockers there in the 1980s. The Emporium ran an ad in the June 1, 1907 SF Examiner:

“Sale Men’s Khaki Trousers”
“1,500 Pairs United States Army Khaki Trousers”
“They have double reinforced seat, are strongly sewed and well made throughout. The same trousers the United States Government purchased in lots of 100,000 for army use at $2.95 a pair. Just the thing for work or vacation use. Our price $1.50.”

*****

The June 15, 1907 edition of The Yale Daily News had this ad from a store called Pagter’s:

“A further reduction in all departments. We must close out all broken lots and so for balance of sale these prices will prevail.

“$4.65 for $8.00 Flannel Trousers
“$4.00 for $6.00 and $7.00 Flannels
“$3.00 for $5.00 Flannel Trousers
“$3.65 for Corduroy Trousers
“$1.35 for Khaki Trousers”

*****

In the June 16, 1907 edition of the Los Angeles Times, Dyas-Cline Company advertised these goodies for the women:

“Divided khaki riding skirts. $5.00
“Plain walking khaki skirts. $3.50
“Norfolk Jackets. $2.50
“Khaki Vests. $1.00
“Leggings. 50¢”

*****

And, again, something for the women. From the June 23, 1907, San Francisco Examiner:

“Nothing more appropriate to wear for summer wear, for seaside or traveling than one of these LADIES’ MILITARY KHAKI SUITS”

“Made of military twilled cloth, unshrinkable, washable; jacket rough-rider effect; standing collar; military brass buttons; tailor-stitched pleats down the front, also back; also belt skirt tourist effect; overlap seams; fancy tailor-stitched pockets on sides; deep hem. Our price.............$3.95.”

*****

In the Los Angeles Times for July 14, 1907, clothier Harris & Frank had an advertisement:

“Here are Some of the Things You Can Buy at Reduced Prices at Our Great Removal Expansion Sale:

“Khaki Coats
“Khaki Pants”

(But Harris and Frank also listed “Working Pants” and “Outing Trousers.” I don’t know what the differences among these three types of casual trousers were. The ad doesn’t say.)

******

Los Angeles Times for October 22, 1909:

The Bargain House has

“Men’s Overalls and Khaki Clothing”

“Men’s heavy weight khaki pants, with the roomy seat, full peg top; coats the same price; made to sell at $2.00; ‘Magnet Brand,’ ‘Stronghold,’ and ‘Boss.’”

*****

As you can see, khaki clothing “grew up” between 1898 and 1910.

But what about the people who responded to those ads? What did those early adopters actually do while wearing their rugged new khakis? The stories of a few of them will be told in Part IV.
 
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Peak and Pine

Connoisseur
Wow. As in super sleuthing at work here.

However, am running out of skin room to write crib notes. (Smoking okay during the test? I don't, but may start because I'm increasingly nervous about this.). Good job. My favorite cloth has needed a good biographer.
 
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