sskim3

Super Member
So I got a pair of uninsulated LL Bean Duck Boots. They have served me quite well. With thick socks and the sherling wool insert, it does pretty well in most weather conditions.

Unfortunately the other day, I was out in the cold for a few hours and my feet were ice cold. I was wondering if getting a boot liner would be worth the investment instead of getting a brand new boot.

Was looking at something like this. Thoughts? Recommendations?
ASKANDY UPDATE
Be sure to check out our article covering everything you wanted to know about L.L.Bean Boot Liners.
 
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Tilton

Advanced Member
If one spends any considerable time outdoors when the temps are in the single digits, Bean boots lined or unlined are simply not adequate.
Agreed. They're appropriate for quick trips from car to door or stoop to mailbox and not much more extreme usage. I've made the mistake of wearing my 10" shearling-lined bison Bean boots hunting in weather well-below freezing and sincerely regretted it. If you're outside a lot in serious cold, forget Beans and shrug off fashion: wear some Sorels or Mucks or Bogs. Your feet will thank you and, frankly, part of being well-dressed is being appropriately dressed.
 

sskim3

Super Member
Agreed. They're appropriate for quick trips from car to door or stoop to mailbox and not much more extreme usage. I've made the mistake of wearing my 10" shearling-lined bison Bean boots hunting in weather well-below freezing and sincerely regretted it. If you're outside a lot in serious cold, forget Beans and shrug off fashion: wear some Sorels or Mucks or Bogs. Your feet will thank you and, frankly, part of being well-dressed is being appropriately dressed.
Ya, makes sense. Just wanted to know what options there were for my current boots. Was stuck at Yankee Stadium for ~3-4 hours for a Hockey Game. Weather was in the 15-20 degrees. I was definitely warm everywhere else.
 

Puig

New Member
I'm wearing mine today. I just had the rubber bottoms replaced last year, I originally had shearling leather insoles bought at Bean, which had dried out and were like potato chips, Bean sent me free foam insoles when they resoled my boots, I replaced those with a new pair of shearling insoles which are not bonded to leather anymore, but are still fine for these boots. Check the website, I assume they still make them, not expensive and do the job.
 

godan

Advanced Member
Woulda and Tilton are right. If you need winter boots, get Sorels or serious mountain boots. As for upgrading your duck boots, my experience is that heavier, thicker socks work better than insoles or liners. It depends on how the boots fit otherwise, but improving yours is a much less expensive option than buying new boots. Within the inherent limitations of rubber, you can try a few things.
 

xcubbies

Super Member
I recently bought a pair of Sorel Caribous with wool liners and I'm kicking myself that I hadn't bought them years before. They're not lightweight, but they are certainly warm. After considering some of the fleece insoles from Beans, at $20, it just made a lot more sense to pay $100 (on sale)on the Sorels . I found numerous options on Ebay. They are sized large, so buy at least one half size down. Having said that, they're probably overkill if you live in more moderate (climatically) areas, despite the extreme, atypical weather that's hitting the south this year.
 
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sskim3

Super Member
I recently bought a pair of Sorel Caribous with wool liners and I'm kicking myself that I hadn't bought them years before. They're not lightweight, but they are certainly warm. After considering some of the fleece insoles from Beans, at $20, it just made a lot more sense to pay $100 (on sale)on the Sorels . I found numerous options on Ebay. They are sized large, so buy at least one half size down. Having said that, they're probably overkill if you live in more moderate (climatically) areas, despite the extreme, atypical weather that's hitting the south this year.
Just bought a pair of liners. If it doesnt work out its only $18 sunk cost. Then I can invest in a proper pair of Sorels. The winter in the nj ny area has been brutal. Sadly I am looking forwards to seeing a 30 degree higj tomorrow. Thanks for the input.
 

dnfuss

New Member
Source for the Shearling/Leather Insoles?

I'm wearing mine today. I just had the rubber bottoms replaced last year, I originally had shearling leather insoles bought at Bean, which had dried out and were like potato chips, Bean sent me free foam insoles when they resoled my boots, I replaced those with a new pair of shearling insoles which are not bonded to leather anymore, but are still fine for these boots. Check the website, I assume they still make them, not expensive and do the job.
I have Bean Boots in both the 10" height and the shoe, bought many years ago. I also bought two pair of the shearling leather insoles, one with steel shank and one with leather shank. Here they are shown on a page from a 1969 LL Bean catalogue:






I've asked Bean about these insoles. They no longer carry them or seem to know who does. Does anybody know a source for these? Mine are getting pretty beat-up and I'd love to get replacements.
 

xcubbies

Super Member
I have Bean Boots in both the 10" height and the shoe, bought many years ago. I also bought two pair of the shearling leather insoles, one with steel shank and one with leather shank. Here they are shown on a page from a 1969 LL Bean catalogue:




The current Bean version of the fleece innersoles is vastly inferior to the old ones posted here. I'm afraid that these are lost to history.
 

benjclark

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I have Bean Boots in both the 10" height and the shoe, bought many years ago. I also bought two pair of the shearling leather insoles, one with steel shank and one with leather shank. Here they are shown on a page from a 1969 LL Bean catalogue:




The current Bean version of the fleece innersoles is vastly inferior to the old ones posted here. I'm afraid that these are lost to history.

I have a flat piece of Alpaca felt that acts as an insole in mine, and I find it to insulate well enough.
http://www.alpacanation.com/alpaca-products/03_viewproduct_store.asp?name=114034

Only $6 each it looks like!!
 

hardline_42

Honors Member
I agree that Bean Boots are inadequate for the weather we've been having in the Northeast this winter. Bean makes a Thinsulate/Goretex liner for their unlined boots, but they aren't cheap. For a temporary fix, chemical toe warmers work pretty well. Personally, I've had to pull out the big guns on many occasions this year; a pair of Hoffman Voyager Pac Boots:

Thick leather, beefy wool liners, replaceable soles and made in Idaho. They make my Bean Boots feel like ballet slippers.
 

unmodern

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I've found that the Bean boots with Thinsulate are plenty warm in Northeastern climes. Really a world of difference from the unlined ones. The key is to buy them at the indicated size and not size down: they're meant to be big so that warm air (the best insulator) can circulate. I also wear them with wool socks when it gets really cold. My feet are always warm to hot.
 

hardline_42

Honors Member
I've found that the Bean boots with Thinsulate are plenty warm in Northeastern climes. Really a world of difference from the unlined ones. The key is to buy them at the indicated size and not size down: they're meant to be big so that warm air (the best insulator) can circulate. I also wear them with wool socks when it gets really cold. My feet are always warm to hot.
I remembered as I wore my Thinsulate (not Thinsulate/Goretex) Bean Boots today that they are indeed much warmer than the unlined, but without the bulk of a full liner (the insulation is in the rubber bottom only). I would never have bought them myself, but I had an old pair of MHS rebuilt with a Thinsulate bottom because it was the only kind that said "Maine Hunting Shoe" and not "Bean Boot." I was pleasantly surprised and will continue to replace worn out bottoms with the Thinsulate bottom from here on out. Still, I would rate them as adequate for commuting and trekking through light snow in milder winter temps. For prolonged use or very cold temps, I suggest a true pac boot.
 
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