NEW_Rome

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
On several off-the-rack white shirts with a small pleat in the back there is an horizontal loop where the pleat and the yoke meet. I have asked several people and none of them know what this is for. The most consistent answer I get is that it is for braces to go through, but based on the size and location of the loop this makes no sense. Thoughts on this loop?
 

Cruiser

Connoisseur
It's used to hang the shirt up on a hook when you don't have a proper hanger, such as you might do in the gym.

When I was in high school in the mid-60's it was rare for one of those loops (I won't tell you what they were called as some might find it offensive) to last through even one day. As you walked down the hallway someone would invariably rip it off. More than a few shirts were torn in the process. Most guys would carefully cut them off with a razor blade just to avoid this fate.

Cruiser
 

apachecadillac

New Member
Back in Cruiser's Day, they were also known as fruit loops. I respect him for pulling a punch, but there was a cereal called "Fruit Loops" and at least the younger kids thought that was the reference.

And, yeah, they got routinely torn off. As I remember middle school it was just too tempting to sneak up behind some buddy and give it a yank.
 
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ComboOrgan

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
There were locker loops on all of the shirts with a box pleat that I bought in the 50's and 60's. I am not sure when they faded out - during the 70's I think.
I guess they're back in then.

All my OCBDs have locker loops. Most are from Land's End, which isn't necessarily a good indicator of what's in style, but I have a couple Hickey OCBDs that have them too.
 

Andy

Site Creator/ Administrator
Staff member
NEW_Rome:

Didn't you just look in the Sport Shirt Chapter of your copy of The Encyclopedia of Men's Clothes and find:
Locker Loop is an extra fabric ring on the high center back on shirts. Usually where the pleat meets the yoke. All the original Brooks Brothers oxford button downs had this feature, which became a basic in the Ivy League style. The purpose was to hang your shirt, in a locker, by the loop so that it wouldn’t wrinkle.
What? :eek: Don't have a copy? No problem, see below! :icon_smile:
 

Scoundrel

Advanced Member
Yes, as obvious as it may seem, the loop is indeed meant to be used to hang the shirt when dressing/undressing. Seems kind of useless now that we have non-iron, and people go to the gym in t-shirts. Maybe there are other places to hang a shirt. Now, if only someone could tell me why formal shirts (with turn down collars) have vertical loops right below the back of the neck? :confused:
 
I guess they're back in then.

All my OCBDs have locker loops. Most are from Land's End, which isn't necessarily a good indicator of what's in style, but I have a couple Hickey OCBDs that have them too.
Well, I guess maybe they never vanished completely, but became a lot less common then they once were.

Now, I wish we could get rid of the bothersome gauntlet buttons, although brooks does not have them, at least on the shirts that I buy.
 

Miket61

Advanced Member
Yes, as obvious as it may seem, the loop is indeed meant to be used to hang the shirt when dressing/undressing. Seems kind of useless now that we have non-iron, and people go to the gym in t-shirts. Maybe there are other places to hang a shirt. Now, if only someone could tell me why formal shirts (with turn down collars) have vertical loops right below the back of the neck? :confused:
I belong to a businessmen's social/athletic club, so we have a lot of members who go into the locker room in suits. The members' lockers (with our names on brass plaques on the doors) have two hooks and enough space on the floor of the locker to put a pair of shoes. I think I'd find it useful for my broadcloth shirts to have such a loop.

(the term I heard for them growing up was a "[British slang for cigarette] tag.")

No guess on the formal shirt question. Maybe whoever answers it can tell me what the loop of elastic is for on the inside of my white waistcoat, as there isn't a corresponding button inside my trousers.
 

Jovan

Honors Member
Now, if only someone could tell me why formal shirts (with turn down collars) have vertical loops right below the back of the neck? :confused:
I think they're meant for backless waistcoats.

No guess on the formal shirt question. Maybe whoever answers it can tell me what the loop of elastic is for on the inside of my white waistcoat, as there isn't a corresponding button inside my trousers.
Maybe it isn't for a button so much as threading through that little tab that buttons on the inside?
 

Miket61

Advanced Member
Maybe it isn't for a button so much as threading through that little tab that buttons on the inside?
I won't be wearing my tuxedo again until Wednesday night, but while I'm getting dressed I'll see if that makes sense. I don't have a tailcoat - I wear my white waistcoat, pique shirt (with covered placket) and white tie with my peak-lapel tuxedo to create sort of a 1920s costumey look.
 

MarkfromMD

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
When I was in high school in the mid-60's it was rare for one of those loops (I won't tell you what they were called as some might find it offensive) to last through even one day. As you walked down the hallway someone would invariably rip it off. More than a few shirts were torn in the process. Most guys would carefully cut them off with a razor blade just to avoid this fate.

Cruiser
Haha! I graduated HS in 2006 and this is still commonplace. We were required to wear sport coats to class but only from October through April. During September and May anyone caught with one of these loops would most likely have it ripped off while walking down the hallway.

(the term I heard for them growing up was a "[British slang for cigarette] tag.")
Although I can see the use for them as a "locker loop" (especially when having to change for gym class), the name you mentioned was still the common term for them at my school also.
 
I never saw locker loops on shirts until I was in college and we never had a special name for them nor did we pay any attention to them, let alone rip them off.

Perhaps my generation was more gentlemanly :icon_smile: or it was that we were just content to forcefully remove the ring portion of Buick hood ornaments - a feature that has not been seen on automobiles for many years in the interest of pedestrian safety.
 

SimonTemplar

New Member
when is was in school in the late 70's and 80's, the thing to do was to tear off the pocket on each others dress shirts, and also snip each others ties. Wow, this thread brought back great memories.
 

moss01

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
The tag (loop) comes from the button-down shirt's history in America for prep school uniforms. The loop made it convenient to store in the locker while playing sports. Not sure whether the English versions did the same.
 
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