Fading Fast

Connoisseur
fdedd22c599deaa03ed2b8979a75a5e3.jpg

I'm not a white-pants guy, but "unskinny*" the jacket and take the crest off and I like the outfit (meh on the belt).

*I'm fine with slim fit (works well for my frame) and I like the look if you're built for it, but skinny is slim taken too far as, for example, his arms look like they'd struggle to bend all the way in those sleeves.
 

London380sl

Senior Member
Apart from the fact the blazer looks about 2 sizes too small for the model I'll give the navy blazer and white pants another thumbs up. Unlike a lot of people the crest don't really bother me. I suspect the reason is ,when I was growing up, we had a number of private boys and girls schools in the city that I lived in and the dress code for them for was a blazer with school crest. I just associate blazer and crests as being normal.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
Apart from the fact the blazer looks about 2 sizes too small for the model I'll give the navy blazer and white pants another thumbs up. Unlike a lot of people the crest don't really bother me. I suspect the reason is ,when I was growing up, we had a number of private boys and girls schools in the city that I lived in and the dress code for them for was a blazer with school crest. I just associate blazer and crests as being normal.
I understand your view, and agree that school, university, club or other institutional crests (and neckties) displaying a "coat of arms" are customary, and appropriate in my humble opinion. I'll happily admit that I find them rather enjoyable when seen on a blazer or tie. Part of the functon of these insignia is to denote membership in a group, so that a person wearing the crest of a cricket club on his blazer, say, would be identified as such.( I've worn such blazers myself, back in cricketing days). It's the idea of a military regiment extended to civilian life. But somehow a crest that is effectively an advertisement for a manufacturer seems inappropriate and arriviste to me.

Does the RL crest signify membership in an RL Club or Society? If it can be worn by anyone who simply buys that blazer, is it a society or club at all? My sense is that Ralph wanted to add traditional English trappings to his clothes, and create an atmosphere redolent of English style and taste. Blazer crests are most commonly identified with that atmosphere, and thus market that atmosphere as part of his collection of pieces.

Of course, RL is free to emblazon his clothes with whatever he wants, and customers are free to buy them or not, so my comment simply reflects my own view in this matter. No offence to anyone, I trust.
 
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London380sl

Senior Member
Totally agree with you. Ralph is putting on his RL crest to emulate traditional British style. Would I buy one blazer like that -probably not.

Having said that I do have a couple of his rugby shirts and they have RL crests on them and, to be honest, I like them. A rugby shirt without a crest just doesn't look right to me.

Same with polo shirts. I expect a polo shirt to have a SMALL emblem on it. Blank polo shirts just don't look right to me.
 

Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
Apart from the fact the blazer looks about 2 sizes too small for the model I'll give the navy blazer and white pants another thumbs up. Unlike a lot of people the crest don't really bother me. I suspect the reason is ,when I was growing up, we had a number of private boys and girls schools in the city that I lived in and the dress code for them for was a blazer with school crest. I just associate blazer and crests as being normal.
I understand your view, and agree that school, university, club or other institutional crests (and neckties) displaying a "coat of arms" are customary, and appropriate in my humble opinion. I'll happily admit that I find them rather enjoyable when seen on a blazer or tie. Part of the functon of these insignia is to denote membership in a group, so that a person wearing the crest of a cricket club on his blazer, say, would be identified as such.( I've worn such blazers myself, back in cricketing days). It's the idea of a military regiment extended to civilian life. But somehow a crest that is effectively an advertisement for a manufacturer seems inappropriate and arriviste to me.

Does the RL crest signify membership in an RL Club or Society? If it can be worn by anyone who simply buys that blazer, is it a society or club at all? My sense is that Ralph wanted to add traditional English trappings to his clothes, and create an atmosphere redolent of English style and taste. Blazer crests are most commonly identified with that atmosphere, and thus market that atmosphere as part of his collection of pieces.

Of course, RL is free to emblazon his clothes with whatever he wants, and customers are free to buy them or not, so my comment simply reflects my own view in this matter. No offence to anyone, I trust.
Agree with both points. My university has never had a crest (heck, I couldn't even get them to start selling logo plaques, though they did give me one I hung in my club) but somewhere I do have a U.S. Army. Unfortunately, it pokes holes in the cloth of the pocket so wearing it on a blazer becomes a permanent thing.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
Agree with both points. My university has never had a crest (heck, I couldn't even get them to start selling logo plaques, though they did give me one I hung in my club) but somewhere I do have a U.S. Army. Unfortunately, it pokes holes in the cloth of the pocket so wearing it on a blazer becomes a permanent thing.
Yes, those types of crests can damage the blazer. Back in my old country, crests were embroidered or sewn right on to the breast pocket (at least for cricketing blazers). So that was about as permanent as one could get!
 

drpeter

Senior Member
Totally agree with you. Ralph is putting on his RL crest to emulate traditional British style. Would I buy one blazer like that -probably not.

Having said that I do have a couple of his rugby shirts and they have RL crests on them and, to be honest, I like them. A rugby shirt without a crest just doesn't look right to me.

Same with polo shirts. I expect a polo shirt to have a SMALL emblem on it. Blank polo shirts just don't look right to me.
Absolutely! You wear the styles you prefer. More power to you.

Personally, I don't require an emblem for the polo shirts I wear (unless it is part of the outfit you wear when you are actually playing polo for a club, LOL). But if it comes with one, I don't mind at all. I have a few Lacoste/IZOD polos with a little alligator embroidered on the front, and I rather like it!

I also have some shirts with the small RL polo player, and one recently acquired button-down shirt with the US Polo Association's polo player emblem on it. (We discussed these logos some weeks ago in another thread, but there was actually a legal battle between the USPA and RL about the emblem and trademark violation.).
 
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eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
And relevant to our crest discussion:
View attachment 49153
Having velcro(ed) Command and Unit patches to my BDU's, flight suits, etc. for so many years, I guess I could be seen as an aficionado of organizational patches/crests. However, I have never had the nerve to wear such on my civilian attire and I certainly would never wear the emblem pictured on that striped blazer! Perhaps on a solid blazer it would work? :icon_scratch:;)
 

TKI67

Super Member
I understand your view, and agree that school, university, club or other institutional crests (and neckties) displaying a "coat of arms" are customary, and appropriate in my humble opinion. I'll happily admit that I find them rather enjoyable when seen on a blazer or tie. Part of the functon of these insignia is to denote membership in a group, so that a person wearing the crest of a cricket club on his blazer, say, would be identified as such.( I've worn such blazers myself, back in cricketing days). It's the idea of a military regiment extended to civilian life. But somehow a crest that is effectively an advertisement for a manufacturer seems inappropriate and arriviste to me.

Does the RL crest signify membership in an RL Club or Society? If it can be worn by anyone who simply buys that blazer, is it a society or club at all? My sense is that Ralph wanted to add traditional English trappings to his clothes, and create an atmosphere redolent of English style and taste. Blazer crests are most commonly identified with that atmosphere, and thus market that atmosphere as part of his collection of pieces.

Of course, RL is free to emblazon his clothes with whatever he wants, and customers are free to buy them or not, so my comment simply reflects my own view in this matter. No offence to anyone, I trust.
I, too, am ok with those various badges of membership: blazer crests, emblematic ties, class rings, and so on, although they can certainly be overdone. I admit to feeling mixed emotions when I see a repp stripe I love from a regiment, school, or club to which i did not belong. Fortunately the few repp strips I have are combinations I like and from schools I attended. I can just see some dude decked out in RL walking down Pall Mall and being asked when he served in India!
 

TKI67

Super Member
Having velcro(ed) Command and Unit patches to my BDU's, flight suits, etc. for so many years, I guess I could be seen as an aficionado of organizational patches/crests. However, I have never had the nerve to wear such on my civilian attire and I certainly would never wear the emblem pictured on that striped blazer! Perhaps on a solid blazer it would work? :icon_scratch:;)
Each year on Veterans Day our church has veterans read the lessons and psalm. They are asked to wear things that evidence their service. Most wear service ribbons on their lapels. It was neat to see one parishioner sporting his Legion of Merit. I am squeamish. A blue and gold tie is my limit in civvies.
 

TKI67

Super Member
View attachment 49151

And relevant to our crest discussion:
View attachment 49153
Actually as Ralph goes Trad, those are two of his better efforts. A polo coat and GTH pants is a classic mid 1960s combination, and a blazer badge on a striped blazer typical of a rowing club would make sense if it were a rowing club badge. Maybe it signifies "Right Left." Those rowing club blazers were typically quite light, and it would not be unusual to see someone adding a layer for a chilly early spring race, although a grey sweat shirt or a Shetland crewneck would be more likely than a very bulky tennis sweater. Sorry, Ralph.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Actually as Ralph goes Trad, those are two of his better efforts. A polo coat and GTH pants is a classic mid 1960s combination, and a blazer badge on a striped blazer typical of a rowing club would make sense if it were a rowing club badge. Maybe it signifies "Right Left." Those rowing club blazers were typically quite light, and it would not be unusual to see someone adding a layer for a chilly early spring race, although a grey sweat shirt or a Shetland crewneck would be more likely than a very bulky tennis sweater. Sorry, Ralph.
⇧ Agreed. I think it was @eagle2250 who first pointed this out when we were talking about Ralph showing belts in advertisements, but sometimes I get the feeling that the outfits in the ads are reverse engineered to solve for the number and kinds of items "the team" wants to push.

So, if rowing blazers and tennis sweaters and pants with odd writing on them are going to be promoted, then the marketing/style team has to do its best to get as many of those and the other items they want to promote into the outfits in the ads.

Also, no original thought here, but it's probably why Ralph is such a fan of layering as, not only can one ad show more items, but if some customers start dressing that way, they'll need to buy more of Ralph's clothes.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
A classic PRL picture, but I am compelled to ask, noting the heft of the fabric, is the fellow second from the left wearing one of those knit sport jackets and also is he wearing shorts...or have my eyes deceived me? :icon_scratch:
Looks like cuffed shorts to me.
Agreed on the cuffed shorts. The top looks like a heavy shawl cardigan to me, but I know what you are thinking with the knit sport jackets, but I'm going with shawl-collared cardigan.
 
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