drpeter

Senior Member
A veritable smorgasbord of poorly coordinated colours, textures and patterns (plus what appears to be flying pheasants on ties). RL seems to have an obsession with pairing neckties and jeans which is too much of a clash for my taste. And that sports jacket looks more like a blanket hastily tailored into a coat.

One thing that is foreign to Ralph: The art of understatement. In my mind, small details go a very long way in dressing well. You can make a very effective difference with a small act of defiance or rule-breaking. Too many of those, and you get noisy dressing instead.

But perhaps it doesn't matter for headless mannikins. Reminds me, I had a girlfriend who used that word as a term of endearment, as in "Don't you think it's time for lunch, mannikins?"
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
A veritable smorgasbord of poorly coordinated colours, textures and patterns (plus what appears to be flying pheasants on ties). RL seems to have an obsession with pairing neckties and jeans which is too much of a clash for my taste. And that sports jacket looks more like a blanket hastily tailored into a coat.

One thing that is foreign to Ralph: The art of understatement. In my mind, small details go a very long way in dressing well. You can make a very effective difference with a small act of defiance or rule-breaking. Too many of those, and you get noisy dressing instead.

But perhaps it doesn't matter for headless mannikins. Reminds me, I had a girlfriend who used that word as a term of endearment, as in "Don't you think it's time for lunch, mannikins?"
Ralph, in many of his ads, throws a lot of looks and clothes and layers together all in one. Sometimes, especially for the Purple Label line, he does quieter looks, but as you note, his ads are often not about understatement.

I've also noticed that in the flagship store - inside the store, not the window - the mannequins are often less over the top and more like what a regular person would wear. Maybe, the thought is to catch your eye with all the stuff in the window, but show you how you might really wear it once you are in the store.


The olive hued shawl collared cardigan layered under that handsome camel hued duffle coat is nice, indeed very nice. However, I fully agree with drpeter's assessment of that horse blanket sports coat...it's just got to go! LOL. ;)
I, too, though that shawl-collared cardigan and duffle went really, really well together. While I could quibble about this or that, I thought that entire outfit was pretty good. I agree with both of you regarding the outfit on the right.


Oh, and @drpeter, a young Robert Redford cares to differ with your opinion on jeans and ties. :)
71a39132649fe259810397a604783116.jpg
6591099131_be3e375a19_w.jpg

Surprisingly hard to find a good pick that showed the full outfit with the tie clearly visible, but having seen the movie, he wears this outfit - sport coat, tie, chambray shirt, sweater and jeans - for about a third of the movie.

Kidding aside, done well - like Redford does here (note all the rough textures) - I like the tie-and-jean look, but haven't worn it myself in decades to be honest.
 

TKI67

Super Member
@drpeter nailed it on the RL penchant for overdoing it and the importance of small details. RL clearly has access to tweeds, sweater woolens, and other goods that never hit the mainstream and individually are captivating, but he can take those beautiful things and concoct a sundae with three flavors of ice cream, fudge, crushed pineapple, marshmallow cream, chopped pecans, whipped cream, a dusting of pistachios, a cherry, and, sometimes, a cocktail shrimp hanging off the side. Ironically, he is often very good with details, little things like beautiful working buttons, the braided cord he used on some lovely tan tassel loafers, and amazing stitching on everything. The glen plaid tweed jackets he finds take me back to the sixties when that sort of luxurious variety was a norm and now is serendipitously encountered but rarely.

I am in the distinct minority, but I rather like his horse blanket jackets. I could envision one with a chambray BD, some faded Levis, and a pair of snuff suede LHSs in place of the usual goat suede.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
Ralph, in many of his ads, throws a lot of looks and clothes and layers together all in one. Sometimes, especially for the Purple Label line, he does quieter looks, but as you note, his ads are often not about understatement.

I've also noticed that in the flagship store - inside the store, not the window - the mannequins are often less over the top and more like what a regular person would wear. Maybe, the thought is to catch your eye with all the stuff in the window, but show you how you might really wear it once you are in the store.




I, too, though that shawl-collared cardigan and duffle went really, really well together. While I could quibble about this or that, I thought that entire outfit was pretty good. I agree with both of you regarding the outfit on the right.


Oh, and @drpeter, a young Robert Redford cares to differ with your opinion on jeans and ties. :)
View attachment 50188 View attachment 50189
Surprisingly hard to find a good pick that showed the full outfit with the tie clearly visible, but having seen the movie, he wears this outfit - sport coat, tie, chambray shirt, sweater and jeans - for about a third of the movie.

Kidding aside, done well - like Redford does here (note all the rough textures) - I like the tie-and-jean look, but haven't worn it myself in decades to be honest.
Sorry, old chap. It still does not look good to me. What's more, the colours and textures in Redford's outfit don't look well put together either. But tastes differ, and if you like the look, that's fine with me, LOL.
 

TKI67

Super Member
Ralph, in many of his ads, throws a lot of looks and clothes and layers together all in one. Sometimes, especially for the Purple Label line, he does quieter looks, but as you note, his ads are often not about understatement.

I've also noticed that in the flagship store - inside the store, not the window - the mannequins are often less over the top and more like what a regular person would wear. Maybe, the thought is to catch your eye with all the stuff in the window, but show you how you might really wear it once you are in the store.




I, too, though that shawl-collared cardigan and duffle went really, really well together. While I could quibble about this or that, I thought that entire outfit was pretty good. I agree with both of you regarding the outfit on the right.


Oh, and @drpeter, a young Robert Redford cares to differ with your opinion on jeans and ties. :)
View attachment 50188 View attachment 50189
Surprisingly hard to find a good pick that showed the full outfit with the tie clearly visible, but having seen the movie, he wears this outfit - sport coat, tie, chambray shirt, sweater and jeans - for about a third of the movie.

Kidding aside, done well - like Redford does here (note all the rough textures) - I like the tie-and-jean look, but haven't worn it myself in decades to be honest.
He looks like that
Ralph, in many of his ads, throws a lot of looks and clothes and layers together all in one. Sometimes, especially for the Purple Label line, he does quieter looks, but as you note, his ads are often not about understatement.

I've also noticed that in the flagship store - inside the store, not the window - the mannequins are often less over the top and more like what a regular person would wear. Maybe, the thought is to catch your eye with all the stuff in the window, but show you how you might really wear it once you are in the store.




I, too, though that shawl-collared cardigan and duffle went really, really well together. While I could quibble about this or that, I thought that entire outfit was pretty good. I agree with both of you regarding the outfit on the right.


Oh, and @drpeter, a young Robert Redford cares to differ with your opinion on jeans and ties. :)
View attachment 50188 View attachment 50189
Surprisingly hard to find a good pick that showed the full outfit with the tie clearly visible, but having seen the movie, he wears this outfit - sport coat, tie, chambray shirt, sweater and jeans - for about a third of the movie.

Kidding aside, done well - like Redford does here (note all the rough textures) - I like the tie-and-jean look, but haven't worn it myself in decades to be honest.
He looks like that prof who had to wear a coat and tie because they all did but also wanted to look cool and approachable, sort of like Donald Sutherland in Animal House. Ironically the profs who didn't try to straddle the dying tweed culture and the nascent denim culture but picked one camp or the other came across as far more authentic.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
Now this one works for me, with one possible exception, the narrow legs of the trousers! But that is understandable, since it is a bow to current fashion, which clothing manufacturers are, to some extent, compelled to heed.

The old-fashioned club collar is a nice touch, and in a sense it balances the whole outfit, partly because the narrow trousers are also a throw-back to 1960s style, or even earlier, to the tight-fitting trousers or breeches of the Edwardian past. The yellow cardigan/waistcoat pulls everything together, and that is a surprising and inspired touch. The one large windowpane visible on the jacket is the only pattern -- the rest are solids, in colours that complement one another. And the brown oxford lace-ups are perfect for the colours in the clothes. Nothing clashes, everything is in harmony.

This is a good one. Advantage Ralph.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Ralph, in many of his ads, throws a lot of looks and clothes and layers together all in one. Sometimes, especially for the Purple Label line, he does quieter looks, but as you note, his ads are often not about understatement.

I've also noticed that in the flagship store - inside the store, not the window - the mannequins are often less over the top and more like what a regular person would wear. Maybe, the thought is to catch your eye with all the stuff in the window, but show you how you might really wear it once you are in the store.




I, too, though that shawl-collared cardigan and duffle went really, really well together. While I could quibble about this or that, I thought that entire outfit was pretty good. I agree with both of you regarding the outfit on the right.


Oh, and @drpeter, a young Robert Redford cares to differ with your opinion on jeans and ties. :)
View attachment 50188 View attachment 50189
Surprisingly hard to find a good pick that showed the full outfit with the tie clearly visible, but having seen the movie, he wears this outfit - sport coat, tie, chambray shirt, sweater and jeans - for about a third of the movie.

Kidding aside, done well - like Redford does here (note all the rough textures) - I like the tie-and-jean look, but haven't worn it myself in decades to be honest.
Are those shots from "Three Day of The Condor?" I think so. ;)
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Are those shots from "Day of The Condor?" I think so. ;)
Yes, you are spot on it's from "Three Days of the Condor." Stupid me failed to note that.

I've been thinking about all the comments around ties, tweeds and jeans in this thread recently and wonder if I like the combination because I grew up in the '70s and saw it as a much cooler look than the loud colors and garish styles of that time that, even as a kid, I didn't like.

Something in me, way before I understood (literally) anything about "Ivy" or "Trad" or "classic," liked the classic looks I saw on TV in all the old movies I watched as a kid. Hence, when someone like Redford wore something closer to those looks than a polyester suit with a loud shirt, it looked great to me.

I still like the look to this day, but as noted, haven't worn it in decades. Part of that is because a tie in the '70s was still quite common and still carried some currency. So dressing as Redford did might have made sense in that moment (@TKI67 makes a strong argument against this point), but today, a tie and jeans would mean nothing and not really make much sense.

My guess, it's just a tick of mine from the era in which I was raised.
 

TKI67

Super Member
Now this one works for me, with one possible exception, the narrow legs of the trousers! But that is understandable, since it is a bow to current fashion, which clothing manufacturers are, to some extent, compelled to heed.

The old-fashioned club collar is a nice touch, and in a sense it balances the whole outfit, partly because the narrow trousers are also a throw-back to 1960s style, or even earlier, to the tight-fitting trousers or breeches of the Edwardian past. The yellow cardigan/waistcoat pulls everything together, and that is a surprising and inspired touch. The one large windowpane visible on the jacket is the only pattern -- the rest are solids, in colours that complement one another. And the brown oxford lace-ups are perfect for the colours in the clothes. Nothing clashes, everything is in harmony.

This is a good one. Advantage Ralph.
A pretty perfect critique.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
I think the one element that is unusual here is the red (Moleskin?) notebook. I have not seen this item in an RL image, although my familiarity with these images is limited. Just a guess, I could be wrong.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Only Ralph could convince us to pay so much for a rig that looks as if the components were just rescued from the locala Goodwill store! Only the sweater and possibly the pink hued OCBD are worth salvaging in my book. Sorry, but this one really crosses a line that brings out the worst in me. LOL. ;)
I agree as the sweater and OCBD are the two items I like. The jacket isn't my thing, but I get that rowing blazers are a thing. However, that one is so short it looks undersized to my eye. Also, even though rowing blazers have a genuine history, who really wears them, and where do they wear them, today?

I guess there's a niche of old-line money that might still wear them, but who else does? It might have already passed - I'm never up on this stuff - but rowing blazers seemed to be a thing a few years ago with several companies making them, yet I never saw them worn by anyone.
 

TKI67

Super Member
I think the one element that is unusual here is the red (Moleskin?) notebook. I have not seen this item in an RL image, although my familiarity with these images is limited. Just a guess, I could be wrong.
It seems to me to be the sort of prop one would find in an RL advert. It looks fully RL to me.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
Only Ralph could convince us to pay so much for a rig that looks as if the components were just rescued from the locala Goodwill store! Only the sweater and possibly the pink hued OCBD are worth salvaging in my book. Sorry, but this one really crosses a line that brings out the worst in me. LOL. ;)
LOL, the local Goodwills I frequent tend to have clothes in much better condition than the ones shown here.

I think that in matters of clothing, there has always been a kind of inverse snobbery associated with beat-up, or faded or damaged clothing. I think we have had comments on this aspect of dressing from members here (including myself). I read somewhere recently -- perhaps here in this forum -- about students in prep schools sanding down the collars of their OCBDs to achieve a frayed look. This is similar to shoe manufacturers darkening parts of shoes, especially the toecaps, to achieve an antique look artificially, or jeans makers selling new jeans that are ripped.

On the one hand, good patina, achieved through long use, means something, especially in clothing that is of good quality to begin with; however, there is a fine line between patina and grubbiness!
 
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