peterc

Super Member
Regarding Post 1656, you fellows who have never had a suit with extended shoulders like the one Mr. L. is wearing don't know what you are missing. A suit like that feels like you are wearing a sweater. You have complete ease of movement, can sit at dinner, can walk comfortably, etc. Both RL's and Alexander Julian's suits were cut like this in the 80's. Did not then realize how lucky I was to have them.
 

drpeter

Super Member
I don't have a suit with wide shoulders of the sort RL is sporting, but I have both single-breasted, and especially DB jackets with different amounts of width in the shoulder. Personally, I have never felt that comfort levels are greater compared with normal-width shoulders, but then, I am also quite comfortable with higher scyes in jackets. With shoulders, if they extend out too far, it is not as aesthetically pleasing. It does violence to the proportions of the rest of the clothing on one's body. For me, the part that makes the greatest difference in terms of comfort is the chest region. If it is too tight and binds, or too loose, I feel discomfort and I would not purchase that jacket.

One example that comes to mind is the late actor Cary Grant. He had a large head relative to the width of his shoulders. His tailors corrected this by making the shoulders of his suit jackets and sport coats wider. So he looks quite well-proportioned until he takes off his jacket and shirt. The classic scene one remembers is in the Hitchcock film North by Northwest, where Grant takes off his jacket and shirt in the men's room at the railway station and wearing just a white undershirt, proceeds to lather up and shave. The narrow shoulders and large head are quite noticeable in this scene.

I could not find a perfect still from the film but this is another one from a different film, the 1957 comedy Kiss Them for Me, that clearly shows the difference between Grant's head and shoulders:

1613014160409.png
 
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drpeter

Super Member
I've never felt comfortable riding scooters. As a young man, I rode motorcycles a fair bit because it was a common, affordable form of transportation where I grew up. Cars were only for the wealthy in those days. And motorcycles, with their larger wheels, were far more stable than scooters with their small wheels.
 

Old Road Dog

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
That photo of Ralph is probably 1980's vintage. The cut of the suit is one he favors as his kind of signature look, very much an homage to Edward, the Prince of Wales (that cut was officially known as the Prince model), discussed here before. I wouldn't be surprised if that suit still gets worn occasionally by Mr. Lauren.
 

drpeter

Super Member
That photo of Ralph is probably 1980's vintage. The cut of the suit is one he favors as his kind of signature look, very much an homage to Edward, the Prince of Wales (that cut was officially known as the Prince model), discussed here before. I wouldn't be surprised if that suit still gets worn occasionally by Mr. Lauren.
I agree. I like the jacket and the cloth very much.

Actually, AFAIK, the plaid cloth is very similar to a tartan used by the Prince of Wales, and is called as such. It dates from a Glen Urquhart style black and white check worn by then POW, Prince Edward VII while grouse-hunting -- at least, that's the legend. More generally the British say glen check (and that could also be colours other than grey). We call it glen plaid. There are plenty of variations with colours and overpanes that are all loosely called POW check or plaid.
 
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peterc

Super Member
Re: Post 1662 - you make many wise observations. I have long had trouble with the way jackets fit me. I think I have wide upper arms relative to the rest of me, because I had this problem when I was a 38R which was 35+ years ago. This explains why I found the suit jackets I had in the 80's so comfortable (Polo, Paul Smith, Alexander Julian, and others),

I find most jackets today are uncomfortably tight in the upper arm area. When I buy a suit, I often had to tell the tailor to deepen the armhole and let the blades out. Sometimes, I have explain what those alterations are!
 

Tweedlover

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Based on the insignia he is wearing on the PRL Field Jacket, the young buck must be an enlisted aircrew member of Ralph's air force! Clearly, flying for Ralph is serious business...look at the 'look' on his face. LOL. ;)
Given the style of it, I suppose someone's name must appear over the left breast. But, I wouldn't be comfortable wearing such with someone else's name other than my own appearing-not that I want to wear anything with my name appearing. :D
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
I do like those cricket sweaters including the crested one. I find RL's 1920-30's-inspired letterman sweaters-the cardigan ones-also quite appealing.
I really like the letterman sweaters too. I had a light tan one with two burgundy stripes on one arm and nothing else - no insignias, crests, fake letters, etc. that I loved and wore out. It had an echo of the letterman sweater, but it wasn't kitschy as it was very plain other than the two stripes.

You can pretty much "design" your own letterman sweaters on Ralph's site under the "create your own" section, but they are quite pricey.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Given the style of it, I suppose someone's name must appear over the left breast. But, I wouldn't be comfortable wearing such with someone else's name other than my own appearing-not that I want to wear anything with my name appearing. :D
Somewhere, hidden in this hoard, I have two of those field jackets stored away,both issued to me by the USAF. One is solid OD hued and the other is in a camouflage pattern, with insulated liners for each. I had my wife remove the insignia and the name tapes off of them, thinking that I would eventually be giving them away, but for some reason the SAC patches were left on the breast pocket of each. The Strategic Air Command was decommissioned in 1992, so I guess it really doesn't matter at this point! ;)
 

drpeter

Super Member
What!!??? No more Strategic Air Command? LOL, are we open to attack from the dreaded Russkies? Or the Chinese?

I read a fascinating article some time ago in the Sunday New York Times Magazine about how one of the unused silos for the ICBMs had been converted into multi-level residential flats for the very wealthy, as hideouts in case of nuclear catastrophe. They were actually small communities built into the silos, with schools, libraries and shops, even a bar and a cinema built in! A two-bedroom flat could cost a cool two million. As soon as the catastrophe struck, you could fly into the area and be helicoptered to the silo location. I have always loved architecture and unique homes, and the whole idea appealed to me from that perspective. But who would want to live in a world that bleak? Here is a website:

https://survivalcondo.com/

You have to admit that there is a bit of poetic irony here -- a survival condo in a disused missile silo! Nice touch. And now, you can have a taste of this style of living for $49 per night, in Kansas:

https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/248469...1613313324_V4gV22f3DCJpBDRK&guests=1&adults=1
 
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