ThomGault

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
What is the most traditional business card holder---is it something supple, like leather, or something sturdy, with a hard frame? Or something else entirely? I prefer a traditional design to mesh well in the judicial system.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
IMG_4907 (2).JPG


The case pictured above is a leather Bosco case I carried for the 22 years I was a civilian employee if the US Govt. From the obvious condition of the case, it appears to have been ridden hard and put up wet. During my USAF career I just didn't have a need for a card case, but as a Civil Servant they insisted we carry business cards and in fact provided them for us. Good luck in your hunt for the perfect card case! ;)
 

challer

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Leather, shell cordovan, all the way. I learned the hard way in Japan. You almost never see metal card case there. I have several shell cases that hold at least 50 cards each (22pt stock). They double as travel wallets at night.
 

ChadHahn

Starting Member
I have a Louis Vuitton card wallet that has a slot on one side for my driver's license and three slots on the other side for credit cards. It's open in the middle for money but since I almost never carry cash I put a few business cards in it.

For a dedicated card holder I have a couple vintage metal card holders. One is brass and the other stainless steel.
 

John M

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Yes. Best way to share your FAX number.
Isn't it remarkable that we still use fax services today?

Also, for my contribution to this topic.

 

ThomGault

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Can't recall the last time I gave or received a business card. Are they really still a thing?
I can't speak for all lines of work, but in the legal world, yes, business cards are still carried.

Yes. Best way to share your FAX number.
You'd be amazed at the number of governmental institutions which insist on continuing to use fax machines, including the largest single agency in the u.s. government's budget, the SSA.

for my contribution to this topic.

I like the suggestion of horween leather, but with the metal branding, it seems a little too ornamental for traditional business usage.


Perhaps I should rephrase my original question: what type of business card case would a professional from the 1920's to 1960's use?
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
...You'd be amazed at the number of governmental institutions which insist on continuing to use fax machines, including the largest single agency in the u.s. government's budget, the SSA.
I have been working, only recently, with a few different parts of the gov't and have encountered what you described. I'm amazed as the government's attitude is "why don't you have a fax machine/number?" It's slowed the entire process down more than once already as the alternative for the government (at least these agencies) isn't email but physical mail.
 

MarcDavidMiller

New Member
I bought a very basic leather case about 10 years ago from Amazon (after returning about 5 others). $8, still being sold on the site, low key appearance with no adornments (besides a subtle logo stamped inside the case).

It holds about 50 cards (depending on thickness, has an accordion separator so two compartments (one for your cards, another for your those of new acquaintances), and a clear window which doesn’t do much.

I tried an old cigarette case as a card case, and reallized that when meeting someone you don’t want to look down, you just want to give cards out as seamlessly as possible. I also try to limit any metal on my person (in and out of government buildings).

After 10 years the leather is in fine shape, although I might get a burgundy case just to change things up a bit.

 

ThomGault

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I have been working, only recently, with a few different parts of the gov't and have encountered what you described. I'm amazed as the government's attitude is "why don't you have a fax machine/number?" It's slowed the entire process down more than once already as the alternative for the government (at least these agencies) isn't email but physical mail.
My office has a "fax" number, but its all digital now, and faxes are delivered in an electronic format; I faxed some documents to the SSA and expected they had similar technology, but instead I was berated by an SSA rep because she thought that the highlighted document I sent to her had been redacted (highlighting is blacked out on black-and-white printers.)
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
My office has a "fax" number, but its all digital now, and faxes are delivered in an electronic format; I faxed some documents to the SSA and expected they had similar technology, but instead I was berated by an SSA rep because she thought that the highlighted document I sent to her had been redacted (highlighting is blacked out on black-and-white printers.)
Back about ten years ago, I had that set up too as it seemed like a good "transition" technology between fax and scanned docs, but after not using it, almost at all, for a few years, we dropped it completely when we moved. It's UFB that so much of the government is still using fax technology and, as per your experience, can't even adjust to "digital" faxes.
 
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