hghevans

New Member
Hi,
I am going up to start at Oxford in a few days time, and am curious to know if anyone has any information on what stereotypical students from each college are like (eg, have heard that those from Balliol are traditionally very left-wing, Oriel very right-wing, Merton into odd sexul deviancy, etc)?
Thanks
:p
PS - any info on Corpus Christi College especially...?
 

Terpoxon

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Merton, sexually deviant? I didn't think anyone there even had sex. Christ Church is supposed to be extremely public school and right wing, and aristocratic.
 

CCabot

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I culled these from various sources. I did not attend Oxford so I cannot vouch for the reliability of any of this information.

All Souls: Not very bright.

Balliol: Left-Wing

Brasenose: Full of “Rahs”

Christ Church: Rich, Aristocratic, and Tory

Corpus Christi: Small and nonchalant

Exeter: Apathetic

Harris Manchester: Stupid

Hertford: Chavs, heavy drinkers, Northern, state-schoolers

Jesus: Welsh

Keble: Rugby players, State schoolers, inferiority complex with St. John’s due to Keble’s land being purchased from them and St. John’s having the reputation of a rich college

Lincoln: Friendly, apathetic, lots of historians, good food

Lady Margaret Hall: For “thick rahs,” heavy partiers

Magdalen: Five - one to change the bulb, and the other four to bugger him senseless.

Mansfield: Friendly, calm, poor, good food

Merton: Workaholics

New: Large and arrogant

Oriel: Rich and Tory (T’Oriel)

Pembroke: Expensive, poor accommodations, good rowing, terrible food

The Queen's: Northerners

St. Anne's: State schoolers, ugly architecture

St. Catherine’s: Ugly architecture (Postmodern)

St Edmund: Aggressive, drunken rugby players

St. Hilda's: Lesbians

St. Hugh's: State schoolers, periphery (non-central) location at the edge of Oxford

St. John's: Rich, state schoolers, academic/geeky/workaholics

St Peter's: Weird, strange, lacking in social skills

Somerville: Gay, poor

Trinity: Rahs, hate Balliol

University – Full of international students

Wadham: Liberal, state schoolers, lots of homosexuals

Worcester: Conservative, athletic, laid back
 

super k

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I believe our member Holdfast is located in that area, he may have some insight, but the above listing seems very detailed
 

Terpoxon

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I culled these from various sources. I did not attend Oxford so I cannot vouch for the reliability of any of this information.

All Souls: Not very bright.
All Souls doesn't really have students. A handful of grad students, but that's it.
 

jsk85

New Member
I studied at Keble College/Ox. during Trinity Term '07 and this is what I came away with:

Keble--sporty, and a bit gay
Jesus--rakes and lushes
Teddy Hall--athletic, meatheaded
Christ Church--landed and monied
Trinity--particularly bookish

Hope this helps,
Joseph
 

LondonFogey

Senior Member
Don't forget the non-University educational establishments:

Brooke's - chippy northerners
Said Business School - rich Americans, Chinese and Arabs
Any language school - annoying shouty Italians

:icon_smile_big:
 

LondonFogey

Senior Member
I beg the school's pardon, it is of course part of the university. As for the students, I am basing this only on those I have seen going in and out when I have been on my way to or from the station.

Oxford, I am sorry to say, is no longer 'a city of aquatint'....

Perhaps you may indulge me a little. Oxford, for me, is Houseman's 'land of lost content'...as a sixth former I joined the compulsory group of 'Oxbridge Rejects' you get in any half-decent school, so the place has always had a mixture of fascination and melancholy for me, like in Hardy's 'Jude the Obscure'. I still have friends there and visit fairly regularly.

We all know the beauty of collegiate Oxford, but there is something about the little houses and back streets of places like Jericho that can't be found in any other city, (except perhaps Cambridge) with its mixture of academic, shabby houses with stacks of bicycles outside, small corner pubs, obscure churches, little parks, esoteric shops, boatyards and decayed industrial structures. Even the interwar suburbs of East Oxford and Cowley have a sense of gentility about them that you don't get anywhere else.

Then there is the beauty of the surrounding countryside; the Trout at Wolvercote, the Cumnor hills; Wittenham Clumps...all in all, probably my favourite place in Britain, if not the world.
 
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JLibourel

Honors Member and King Fop
I should have thought the introduction of coeducation would have changed the ethos of the colleges, but from the comments above, it doesn't seem to have too much.

Balliol was mostly left wing, but there were a fair number of conservatives there when I went.

Judging from the pix of Balliol and Holywell Manor, where I lived, I've seen of late the whole place kind of reminds me of the University of California at Irvine--lots of women and East Asians these days.

The only college that sounds notably different is Keble. It had a reputation for being very devout and athletic in my time. I don't think I ever set foot in Keble. I just recall their scarves were rather similar to Balliol's.
 

noble

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I think you got Magdalen right.

I culled these from various sources. I did not attend Oxford so I cannot vouch for the reliability of any of this information.

All Souls: Not very bright.

Balliol: Left-Wing

Brasenose: Full of “Rahs”

Christ Church: Rich, Aristocratic, and Tory

Corpus Christi: Small and nonchalant

Exeter: Apathetic

Harris Manchester: Stupid

Hertford: Chavs, heavy drinkers, Northern, state-schoolers

Jesus: Welsh

Keble: Rugby players, State schoolers, inferiority complex with St. John’s due to Keble’s land being purchased from them and St. John’s having the reputation of a rich college

Lincoln: Friendly, apathetic, lots of historians, good food

Lady Margaret Hall: For “thick rahs,” heavy partiers

Magdalen: Five - one to change the bulb, and the other four to bugger him senseless.

Mansfield: Friendly, calm, poor, good food

Merton: Workaholics

New: Large and arrogant

Oriel: Rich and Tory (T’Oriel)

Pembroke: Expensive, poor accommodations, good rowing, terrible food

The Queen's: Northerners

St. Anne's: State schoolers, ugly architecture

St. Catherine’s: Ugly architecture (Postmodern)

St Edmund: Aggressive, drunken rugby players

St. Hilda's: Lesbians

St. Hugh's: State schoolers, periphery (non-central) location at the edge of Oxford

St. John's: Rich, state schoolers, academic/geeky/workaholics

St Peter's: Weird, strange, lacking in social skills

Somerville: Gay, poor

Trinity: Rahs, hate Balliol

University – Full of international students

Wadham: Liberal, state schoolers, lots of homosexuals

Worcester: Conservative, athletic, laid back

You did leave out the long list of required paraphernalia such as whip, black lace stockings and a proper cane........


noble
 

David A.

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
A Magdalen graduate must protest!

A few thoughts from a Yank who did his doctoral work at Magdalen from 2000-2005. I can't speak for the Lower Common Room (undergrads), but we in the Middle Common Room (graduates) were no more prone to buggery than anyone else. In my experience, graduates rarely conformed to the stereotypes regarding undergrads at a given college.

On a related note, I had several friends in St. Hilda's (a women's college), which didn't strike me as particularly gay-oriented. However, there were gay students who intentionally chose to attend Mansfield because of its reputation.

I will say that I had two friends from extremely wealthy families in Christ Church, in keeping with its reputation. Conversely, Pembroke was known as the college for those who wanted to purchase their admission. In my time at Oxford, a British paper sent a reporter undercover to arrange such a purchase, then embarrassed the college by going public.

Finally, I should add that several colleges only have graduate students, most importantly St. Antony's and Nuffield. St. Antony's is known for the diverse national origins of its student body.
 

jackmccullough

Honors Member
Basic question

What is the relationship of the colleges at English universities to the university, and to the other colleges at the university?

In the United States, the colleges, schools, and departments of a university are part of, and subordinate to, the university or college. At least at the undergraduate level you are generally admitted to the university, and then choose the college or department you're going to do your studies in based on interest. Is it the same in England, or is the arrangement looser, with students applying for the college and the university status flowing from the admission to a particular college? Can you transfer readily between colleges at the same university?

Thanks.
 
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