drpeter

Senior Member



View attachment 47262


View attachment 47263
I spent lots of time in Ecuador in the eighties and nineties, and was even in the town of Jipijapa, where the Panama hats are made. Somehow, I failed to buy one, and I still regret that. I am sure I can get a Panama hat from hat shops in the US or online stores, but it would certainly have been nice to have bought one in the town where they are made. No idea why they are called Panama hats, though.
 

jackcatscal

Starting Member
I spent lots of time in Ecuador in the eighties and nineties, and was even in the town of Jipijapa, where the Panama hats are made. Somehow, I failed to buy one, and I still regret that. I am sure I can get a Panama hat from hat shops in the US or online stores, but it would certainly have been nice to have bought one in the town where they are made. No idea why they are called Panama hats, though.
As I understand it, they came to be called Panama hats when Teddy Roosevelt wore one when he went to Panama to inspect the construction of the canal. (Trivia for the day: Teddy was the first US president to leave the country during his term of office.)
 

drpeter

Senior Member
As I understand it, they came to be called Panama hats when Teddy Roosevelt wore one when he went to Panama to inspect the construction of the canal. (Trivia for the day: Teddy was the first US president to leave the country during his term of office.)
Thank you for this information. Makes sense, since famous people often lend their names, wittingly or not, to things and events..

It reminds me of another Presidential story I have heard having to do with clothing. Apparently a certain type of necktie with roughly 1/4" coloured stripes running diagonally on a white background was favoured by both President John F Kennedy and his brother Robert. So the tie was called a Kennedy stripe at least by some folks. I have no idea how true this story is, but it stuck in my memory when I first heard it. I was not living in the US during the 1960s, so those of you who were will have to verify this story.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
Mine is a Stetson made in Germany purchased while on holiday in Positano.

Das ist nicht richtig!

Cheers,

BSR
Warum?

Thank you for this information. Makes sense, since famous people often lend their names, wittingly or not, to things and events..

It reminds me of another Presidential story I have heard having to do with clothing. Apparently a certain type of necktie with roughly 1/4" coloured stripes running diagonally on a white background was favoured by both President John F Kennedy and his brother Robert. So the tie was called a Kennedy stripe at least by some folks. I have no idea how true this story is, but it stuck in my memory when I first heard it. I was not living in the US during the 1960s, so those of you who were will have to verify this story.
Why do Americans call day cravats, ascots?

Don't be in a race to answer! ;)
 

Dhaller

Advanced Member
Interesting stuff!

Of course I'll now never be satisfied with anything less than a superfino Montecristi, handmade in Ecuador, purchased only when I actually visit the shop there myself, having traveled to Ecuador with purpose.

What does that even cost? Thanks, Flanderian! :p

(Actually, my dentist travels to Ecuador annually to offer free dental care at a non-profit clinic there... maybe I'll tag along some time!)

DH
 

drpeter

Senior Member
Warum?



Why do Americans call day cravats, ascots?

Don't be in a race to answer! ;)
The ascot/cravat issue is almost as complex and serpentine as Kant's Categorical Imperative in philosophy or the attempts at a Unified Field Theory in physics. But here's a take from an Ascot/Cravat/Whatever maker:


As for me, I wear neither. I restrict myself to four-in-hands and bowties. All right, I do plump for the occasional black leather collar studded with steel spikes -- always to be worn under the collar. But only under certain circumstances and with other matching attire. (That reminds me, I've got to find my leather jacket, the one with fifteen zippers and more steel studs).
 

drpeter

Senior Member
Interesting stuff!

Of course I'll now never be satisfied with anything less than a superfino Montecristi, handmade in Ecuador, purchased only when I actually visit the shop there myself, having traveled to Ecuador with purpose.

What does that even cost? Thanks, Flanderian! :p

(Actually, my dentist travels to Ecuador annually to offer free dental care at a non-profit clinic there... maybe I'll tag along some time!)

DH
Or you could simply ask him to bring back a hat for you. One of my professor colleagues was going to Morocco some years ago, so I asked him to bring me a fez for my hat collection. Worked out nicely, and it was much less expensive than my flying out to Morocco. Americans call these "Shriner Hats" by the way.
 

Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
Interesting stuff!

Of course I'll now never be satisfied with anything less than a superfino Montecristi, handmade in Ecuador, purchased only when I actually visit the shop there myself, having traveled to Ecuador with purpose.

What does that even cost? Thanks, Flanderian! :p

(Actually, my dentist travels to Ecuador annually to offer free dental care at a non-profit clinic there... maybe I'll tag along some time!)

DH
The last time I checked, at least $1500. Way out of my league, I can tell you.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
Interesting stuff!

Of course I'll now never be satisfied with anything less than a superfino Montecristi, handmade in Ecuador, purchased only when I actually visit the shop there myself, having traveled to Ecuador with purpose.

What does that even cost? Thanks, Flanderian! :p

(Actually, my dentist travels to Ecuador annually to offer free dental care at a non-profit clinic there... maybe I'll tag along some time!)

DH
Sorry, could not say.

But these folks are looking for $2,900 for the one pictured below -



Grade40Montecristi.jpg



The ascot/cravat issue is almost as complex and serpentine as Kant's Categorical Imperative in philosophy or the attempts at a Unified Field Theory in physics. But here's a take from an Ascot/Cravat/Whatever maker:


As for me, I wear neither. I restrict myself to four-in-hands and bowties. All right, I do plump for the occasional black leather collar studded with steel spikes -- always to be worn under the collar. But only under certain circumstances and with other matching attire. (That reminds me, I've got to find my leather jacket, the one with fifteen zippers and more steel studs).
Sorry, I Kant even begin to fathom categorical imperatives! :fool:

But my understanding is that rube American retailers, confusing this handsome casual style with the formal variety worn at the Ascot Races, so termed them on the left side of the Atlantic. :icon_study:

I enjoy them, as I do the related neckerchief . . . . when not in pajamas. 😭
 

drpeter

Senior Member
Today, I picked up a Panama hat with a Made in Ecuador label from a thrift shop for $7.00. It has a wider brim than the ones that are shown in the pictures above, and the weave is nowhere near as fine as a Montecristi. But it is the real thing, as far as I can tell. It is perfectly serviceable for protection in warm weather. There is a point on the outer edge of the brim where the weaving has come apart, but I think some clear glue, applied carefully, should fix the problem. It will join the other hats in my collection.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
^^
Colonel Littleton sells the Colonel's version of a Panama Hat. It looks good and seems to be well made and sells for just $139. Might be a good starter Panama? Just sayin......;)
 

drpeter

Senior Member
^^
Colonel Littleton sells the Colonel's version of a Panama Hat. It looks good and seems to be well made and sells for just $139. Might be a good starter Panama? Just sayin......;)
I just checked it out, it looks very nice. I liked the shooting stick a lot too -- it's on the top picture in the website, with a hat hung on one arm of the stick. This was standard field equipment for officers in the Indian Army. They carried it folded, and if they thought your turnout was wanting in some respect, they would use the shooting stick to tap the precise point where they thought the deficiency was. What fun.
 

some_dude

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
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