Fading Fast

Connoisseur
At first glance, it certainly would have fooled me. Although, the D-Ring Belts and those camp mocs worn by the one gentleman tend to indicate a more recent photo. ;)
So are D-Rings and camp mocs more recent developments? I've never gotten into either, so I've never really thought about when they came into common use.

I've always assumed (we know how dangerous that can be) that they've been around a long time. I thought I've seen old pics of D-ring belts, but maybe not and I can't say I remember seeing really old camp mocs.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
So are D-Rings and camp mocs more recent developments? I've never gotten into either, so I've never really thought about when they came into common use.

I've always assumed (we know how dangerous that can be) that they've been around a long time. I thought I've seen old pics of D-ring belts, but maybe not and I can't say I remember seeing really old camp mocs.
Welllll....having lived through the 50's, 60's and 70's I just don't recall seeing any D-ring fastened belts in the wild during that time. That doesn't guarantee that they weren't there, but not to my knowledge. The camp mocs in ttodays illustration appear to have one of those thick, built-up, wrap around soles on them (although my eyes could be deceiving me). Camp mocs have been around a long, long time, but those soles have not. Just a thought. ;)
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
From a J.Press email yesterday:
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shaggy.jpg

Link to story: in-love-with-a-shaggy-dog

I checked an inflation calculator (I know, they are far from perfect), but if the ad is (as implied in the story) from 1959, then that $14.50 Shaggy Dog should cost about $130 today; whereas, its retail price is $245. And as someone who has tried for years, I can say, they rarely go on sale and then the sale reduction is modest and the selection limited.

Because of that, I finally broke down and bought a full-priced one last year. I can't say if it's "worth" $245 (is it $X better than O'Connell's, etc?), but here's the thing - I love mine. It is very, very well made - thick, beautifully finished, well stitched and with good elastic at the cuffs and waistband. Also, it just looks like a really nice sweater to the eye.

I admit to being a pretty frugal shopper, but I plan to buy another full-priced on this year as, heck, I don't buy a lot of clothes anymore anyway and I know I'll use it a lot (and will love it). Now, what color to get, hmm?
 
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Charles Dana

Honors Member
Welllll....having lived through the 50's, 60's and 70's I just don't recall seeing any D-ring fastened belts in the wild during that time. That doesn't guarantee that they weren't there, but not to my knowledge.
The earliest reference to—and depiction of—a D-ring belt that I could find was an October 1939 Penney’s advertisement for men’s and boys’ slacks. The boys’ slacks have a D-ring belt. (The newspaper page on which the ad appears has a small article announcing that the novelist Zane Grey died unexpectedly of a heart attack.)

I found an ad from 1958 showing a drawing of a boy in a football uniform that includes pants with a D-ring belt. The ad also has a sketch of a boy playing tetherball. (The ball and pole—by Voit— are on sale for $9.99.) The kid is wearing shorts with a D-ring belt.

An ad in 1965 for some MacGregor summer attire has a drawing of a short-sleeve safari jacket with a D-ring belt.

Due to copyright protections, I am not at liberty to reproduce these advertisements. Links won’t work, either, because of the weird way the ads are embedded in the newspaper archives.
 
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Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Received this Paul Stuart email today with this title:

The right combination of City and Country


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To be sure, the clothes in this ad have a vintage echo, but only somewhat. However, what caught my attention was the reference to "City & Country" which has more than a faint echo of the '30s -'60s clothing concept of a divide between the clothes one wears in "town" versus in the "country."

"Esquire" magazine (as @Flanderian showed us in his wonderful thread of "Esquire" illustration from the '30s-'50s) and many advertisements from that same era (stretching into the '60s) regularly discussed the divide and the clothes that could help bridge it.

Today, when dress up is often considered rumpled chinos and a collared shirt, it's hard to appreciate the "Town vs. Country" divide of those earlier decades, but it existed. So, it's funny and very vintage to see Paul Stuart echoing it in its 2020 advertising.
 
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