dparm

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I wear my desert boots pretty much everywhere but for driving I would prefer something different. Ideally I want a shoe that's good for driving (my car has 3 pedals) but that I can also get away with wearing around town and not looking too sloppy.

Any good recommendations on driving shoes/mocs/loafers/venetians?

Allen Edmonds has the Route 100 on sale for $99. I'd like to keep the price around there if possible. I was considering a pair of Weejuns but the flat leather sole has me concerned about grip. Johnston & Murphy's look okay as well for about $125.
 

dparm

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I've got a pair of CH wingtips that I like. May not be as nice as my AEs but for the money they're fine.
 

maximar

Super Member
Cole Hann has a bunch for around that price. You can also try LLbeanocs for 50 bucks. You can call the AE shoe bank right now. They have a sale on seconds and close outs as I type.
 

dparm

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Cole Hann has a bunch for around that price. You can also try LLbeanocs for 50 bucks. You can call the AE shoe bank right now. They have a sale on seconds and close outs as I type.

I need to try them on though. My feet are a bit unusual in that I'm flat-footed. I've also never owned mocs so I'm not even sure if they'll fit me well (heel slippage or whatever).
 

Trip English

Honors Member
I don't want to be so gauche as to ask what kind of car you drive, but ask yourself if it's the type of car that warrants special apparel. Driving mocs are overrated for driving and hellacious for walking around it. I have two expensive pairs and they're lucky to see daylight twice a year. I'd probably sell them if anyone wanted stinky worn out purple shoes.

If you're looking for a nice shoe to kick around in that could stand in for desert boots you have many many options. Camp mocs are a great choice. I wear a lot of boat shoes as catch-all casual shoes. Pretty much any casual shoe is better than a driving moc. Unless of course you drive a Vanquish or something. Then I guess go for it.
 

dparm

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I don't want to be so gauche as to ask what kind of car you drive, but ask yourself if it's the type of car that warrants special apparel. Driving mocs are overrated for driving and hellacious for walking around it. I have two expensive pairs and they're lucky to see daylight twice a year. I'd probably sell them if anyone wanted stinky worn out purple shoes.

If you're looking for a nice shoe to kick around in that could stand in for desert boots you have many many options. Camp mocs are a great choice. I wear a lot of boat shoes as catch-all casual shoes. Pretty much any casual shoe is better than a driving moc. Unless of course you drive a Vanquish or something. Then I guess go for it.
Really? Do the strange rubber cleats make it difficult to walk? (I'm thinking it might be less stable because the rubber is quite narrow compared to the footbed)

I drive an Audi S4, if it's relevant.

Perhaps the Weejuns or something similar is more suitable.
 

hookem12387

Elite Member
I found, in my 3rd pedal days, missed since I got this boring 4runner, that driving mocs didnt do anything other than wear out quickly. Unless you're heel-toeing through the mall parking lot, I wouldn't worry about it all too much. Grab loafers, boat shoes or whatever shoe you particularly like and they'll be fine (if you like driving mocs, by all means get them, but know they seem to wear quickly in my limited experience). Love those s4's btw.
 

smujd

Super Member
I found, in my 3rd pedal days, missed since I got this boring 4runner, that driving mocs didnt do anything other than wear out quickly. Unless you're heel-toeing through the mall parking lot, I wouldn't worry about it all too much. Grab loafers, boat shoes or whatever shoe you particularly like and they'll be fine (if you like driving mocs, by all means get them, but know they seem to wear quickly in my limited experience). Love those s4's btw.
I have the CHs. They are VERY comfortable and look good. They will wear quickly on pavement, etc., but I haven't noticed any expedited wear on carpet, hardwood, etc. I wear mine mostly around the office on weekends to no ill effect.

Are they necessary for driving? Absolutely not. Will they give you an advanatge in most vehicles? Probably not. Do they make a difference in cars with well placed pedals? Definitely! :icon_smile_big:
 

vwguy

Honors Member
Really? Do the strange rubber cleats make it difficult to walk? (I'm thinking it might be less stable because the rubber is quite narrow compared to the footbed)

I drive an Audi S4, if it's relevant.

Perhaps the Weejuns or something similar is more suitable.
I was following a RS4 around last night in my Passat, I had slight car envy ;)

Brian
 

Trip English

Honors Member
Generally the sort of driving mocs that actually help the driving experience have a s
ole with little rubber nubs that are just enough to give you traction. They're otherwise suede or leather slippers. By nature they have no structure which means no support. Great for track day. Bad for other days.

The driving mocs that have full rubber soles, arch support, etc. are driving mocs in name only. I don't like things that are things in name only.
 

jwooten

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I've owned a few pairs of driving mocs and I honestly don't see the usefulness for normal driving. If you are going to be on the track, I wouldn't be wearing mocs, I would opt for a shoe. I drive a Subaru(when not abroad) and even under most spirited driving I am just as capable with Chaco's on as dress loafers. Go with an actual camp moc like the suggested LL Bean if you simply want an alternative to the desert boots, but as Trip and others have stated legitimate driving mocs are quick to wear out and have a rather narrow scope of utility.
 

Mississippi

New Member
Martin Dingman has sales online from time to time. They have a vibram sole and poron insole, so you can actually be comfortable walking from your car to your destination.

Hated Allen Edmonds Winthrop, or any of the others with the driving sole, my doctor said the narrow sole will inevitably cause your step to roll in or out since your feet are wider than the little soles and can cause mechanical problems in the long run.
 

32rollandrock

Connoisseur
I might be talking out of school, not having ever owned a pair of driving moc's, but I really don't get the point.

If you are in your car, then you not walking, and if you are in your car, then no one can see your feet, unless your front passenger leans way over. Heck, even you can't see your own feet without effort, and you really shouldn't be looking at your feet whilst driving. And so appearances don't matter.

If you are not walking, then we don't need to be talking about arch support and other sorts of comfort related things, since your feet will be bearing no weight.

Considering that we're looking for both value and performance, why not these:

https://compare.ebay.com/like/350503195994?var=lv&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar

I should think that neoprene diving (see, just one letter way from "driving," which can't be a coincidence) booties would be perfect for driving. Absolutely no compromise--the lightest, most form-to-the-foot design available. And for a fraction of what you'd pay for those dealie-bobs with rubber nubs, which is really a compromise, when you think about it. Jump out of the car at the petrol station to gas up in neoprene driving booties and bystanders will KNOW you're serious about getting it on in the twisties.

Then again, if you wear a size 9, you can have these:

https://askandyaboutclothes.com/com...0919-Martin-Dingman-bit-driving-mocs-size-9-M

I don't know if they're honest-to-goodness driving mocs, but they do have that strip of rubber that goes up the heel. I'm open to offers.

I don't want to be so gauche as to ask what kind of car you drive, but ask yourself if it's the type of car that warrants special apparel. Driving mocs are overrated for driving and hellacious for walking around it. I have two expensive pairs and they're lucky to see daylight twice a year. I'd probably sell them if anyone wanted stinky worn out purple shoes.

If you're looking for a nice shoe to kick around in that could stand in for desert boots you have many many options. Camp mocs are a great choice. I wear a lot of boat shoes as catch-all casual shoes. Pretty much any casual shoe is better than a driving moc. Unless of course you drive a Vanquish or something. Then I guess go for it.
 
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Trip English

Honors Member
32, driving shoes have two characteristics that make them appropriate for the task - they're very thinly constructed so that your foot can pick up on any information telegraphed through the pedals AND they often have a rounded heel to facilitate pressing down on and switching pedals. All very ridiculous unless, as I mentioned, you're actually in a performance vehicle out on a track. Just as wading boots would be ridiculous on the streets. The STYLE of driving shoes, however, communicates status (you have a car worth buying special shoes for) just like driving gloves or (puke) a Ferrari jacket. I no longer care for such things as I now drive a Jeep - where the accessories run more along the lines of Aleve to reduce back pain and a bull horn to make yourself heard to other passengers.

If you want a comfortable and casual slip on shoe without the construction of a penny loafer or a boat shoe, tuxedo slippers or belgian shoes are far more appropriate for the boulevardier.
 

32rollandrock

Connoisseur
For an added charge, I could sand the soles of the Dingmans to make them thin.

32, driving shoes have two characteristics that make them appropriate for the task - they're very thinly constructed so that your foot can pick up on any information telegraphed through the pedals AND they often have a rounded heel to facilitate pressing down on and switching pedals. All very ridiculous unless, as I mentioned, you're actually in a performance vehicle out on a track. Just as wading boots would be ridiculous on the streets. The STYLE of driving shoes, however, communicates status (you have a car worth buying special shoes for) just like driving gloves or (puke) a Ferrari jacket. I no longer care for such things as I now drive a Jeep - where the accessories run more along the lines of Aleve to reduce back pain and a bull horn to make yourself heard to other passengers.

If you want a comfortable and casual slip on shoe without the construction of a penny loafer or a boat shoe, tuxedo slippers or belgian shoes are far more appropriate for the boulevardier.
 

Doctor Damage

Connoisseur
Each summer I get the idea in my head that I need a pair of traditional driving moccasins, but the flimsy construction and obvious short life of the things turns me off. Last year Aldo did have a pair of really classic looking drivers which appeared to be about 90% the quality of Tod's, but for about 20% the price. The model was the "Coner" (see screenshot below) and if they have them again this spring I think I will get a pair since I've never seen drivers at this price point with traditional styling and good quality*.



* Quality being a highly relative term when it comes to driving moccasins.
 
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