smujd

Super Member
32, driving shoes have two characteristics that make them appropriate for the task - they're very thinly constructed so that your foot can pick up on any information telegraphed through the pedals AND they often have a rounded heel to facilitate pressing down on and switching pedals. All very ridiculous unless, as I mentioned, you're actually in a performance vehicle out on a track. Just as wading boots would be ridiculous on the streets. The STYLE of driving shoes, however, communicates status (you have a car worth buying special shoes for) just like driving gloves or (puke) a Ferrari jacket. I no longer care for such things as I now drive a Jeep - where the accessories run more along the lines of Aleve to reduce back pain and a bull horn to make yourself heard to other passengers.

If you want a comfortable and casual slip on shoe without the construction of a penny loafer or a boat shoe, tuxedo slippers or belgian shoes are far more appropriate for the boulevardier.
By the same rationale, you should oppose boat shoes since, when worn away from a boat, they "communicate[] status (you have a [boat] worth buying special shoes for)..." And jeans, since they communicate that you have a farm or ranch worth buying special pants for. God forbid you wear a polo coat since it communicates that you need warmth between chukkers.
 

Trip English

Honors Member
It's not about the rules. This isn't repp stripe redux. I'm just saying they're uncomfortable and they have a much stronger association with their original purpose than boat shoes.
 

RedBluff

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
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dkoernert

Senior Member
My first and last experience with drivers was with the above-pictured Clarks. I found them to be uncomfortable, and after only a few hours wearing them found a lot of wear. Like everyone else has said, I think drivers are probably best avoided.
 

challer

Senior Member
Right. Driving shoes are not for the track. Try driving a couple hundred miles in a pair of Aldens or similar shoes and many people get it. Easy, cool (temperature wise) shoes that can easily be changed for other shoes when one gets to the place they are going. Not for walking around and wearing out after you arrive. In the days when cars didn't have power everything, driving gloves and shoes were almost necessary to drive in comfort. Today, they have much less real utility. But I can tell you that a pair of Alden longwings in shell with a big heel are mighty uncomfortable on a long drive. Other comfy shoes are just as useful.
 

Dingus

Starting Member
Mocs are useful

Really? Do the strange rubber cleats make it difficult to walk? (I'm thinking it might be less stable because the rubber is quite narrow compared to the footbed)

I drive an Audi S4, if it's relevant.

Perhaps the Weejuns or something similar is more suitable.
I both have an Audi S4 (Cabriolet) and LL Bean's Grand Lake Mocs https://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/70635?feat=70634-ppodxs&dds=y and I love both. I use the Mocs as summer shoes in lieu of sandals, going to the beach etc. (and I had them before I had the car) and when one pair wore out too much I use them as my around the house slippers that can go outside. Overall, they're my most comfortable slip-ons and are also versatile for travel. They have them at the outlets and sometimes on sale, and I think I paid about $50.
 

Himself

Super Member
Right. Driving shoes are not for the track. Try driving a couple hundred miles in a pair of Aldens or similar shoes and many people get it. Easy, cool (temperature wise) shoes that can easily be changed for other shoes when one gets to the place they are going. Not for walking around and wearing out after you arrive. In the days when cars didn't have power everything, driving gloves and shoes were almost necessary to drive in comfort. Today, they have much less real utility. But I can tell you that a pair of Alden longwings in shell with a big heel are mighty uncomfortable on a long drive. Other comfy shoes are just as useful.
+1.

"Cool" as in temperature is a keyword, as anyone who can remember driving classic ('30s-'60s) sports cars can attest. I can't imagine touring New England (Route 100!) in an old Austin Healy like my dad's, wearing his Florsheim longwings. Some of those old sportscars also had tight footwells, where big clodhoppers wouldn't fit.

The main thing with drivers is, they're pretty minimal, like a slipper or moccasin. If you need more support, they're not for you. If you walk a lot, you'll wear them out.

The upside of drivers is that they're more comfortable than boat shoes but more substantial than true moccasins, and may be more acceptable in some circles.

Or if you just like them! No reason required!
 
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