Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
What time is before dawn and what does a "farm breakfast" consist of?
What you saw in that post. Sometimes it might be pork chops instead of the steak or fried chicken. And you can get biscuits or pancakes instead of the potatoes. I never got one because no one in my family owned a farm but I've heard stories .
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Looks like a good breakfast, but who has the time to cook a prime rib in the morning? And to me this reminds me of a lunch more than a breakfast, IMO.
Howard, my friend, the key word is leftovers. It doesn't take much effort to take a slice of prime rib, put it on a rack in a shallow baking pan, drizzle it liberally with the roast drippings and cover it all with tin foil, put it in a 300 degree oven for 20 t0 30 minutes. It tastes almost as good as when we sliced it off the roast the night before!

PS: Don't forget the horseradish! ;)
 

Howard

Connoisseur
Howard, my friend, the key word is leftovers. It doesn't take much effort to take a slice of prime rib, put it on a rack in a shallow baking pan, drizzle it liberally with the roast drippings and cover it all with tin foil, put it in a 300 degree oven for 20 t0 30 minutes. It tastes almost as good as when we sliced it off the roast the night before!

PS: Don't forget the horseradish! ;)

Yeah I understand that but prime rib was meant to be for lunch or dinner, I can't be cooking a rib at quarter to 7 in the morning stinking up the kitchen, you got to remember I still live with My Parents and they don't need to be smelling that so early in the morning, They'll ask "What the hell are you cooking"? 🙄.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Yeah I understand that but prime rib was meant to be for lunch or dinner, I can't be cooking a rib at quarter to 7 in the morning stinking up the kitchen, you got to remember I still live with My Parents and they don't need to be smelling that so early in the morning, They'll ask "What the hell are you cooking"? 🙄.
Howard, we need to teach you how to cook. When I'm roasting a standing rib roast, people coming in and experiencing the nose of the kitchen generally comment, "man it sure smells good in here!" LOL. Although there was a time when I burned up a pot of chili. I thought I'd turned off the burner, but had in fact turned it on high (damned electric ranges!). The wife smelled the burned chili and asked if I was trying to melt her pot! :(
 

Howard

Connoisseur
Howard, we need to teach you how to cook. When I'm roasting a standing rib roast, people coming in and experiencing the nose of the kitchen generally comment, "man it sure smells good in here!" LOL. Although there was a time when I burned up a pot of chili. I thought I'd turned off the burner, but had in fact turned it on high (damned electric ranges!). The wife smelled the burned chili and asked if I was trying to melt her pot! :(

I think I will try to teach myself how to cook, If I mess up I will try again.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Yes, in the same way that chili is a soup. They are both thick, rather than thin or watery. I'm sure you have had chili-stuffed omelettes.

A gumbo is a fairly thick soup/stew containing some form of meat, usually chicken, as well as andouille sausage, and shrimp. It also has okra (or filé leaves) bell peppers, tomatoes, onions, and celery (I often toss in mushrooms). And the mix of spices we call Cajun seasoning -- containing red cayenne pepper, white pepper, black pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, thyme and bay leaf. Salt to taste. It is cooked in chicken stock, preferably home made. You can put all sorts of meats, including venison and rabbit in it.

One of the characteristic features of a gumbo is that it is made from a roux, which is carefully concocted from oil and flour, in a heavy pot. As the oil gets to the right temperature, flour is added and the mixture is constantly stirred as it cooks and darkens, until it has the right degree of brown coloration you desire -- it can be pale, intermediate, or very, very dark. If you burn the roux, then you toss that out (carefully, it is hot!) and start over. The other ingredients are added to this roux and then cooked over medium heat. You serve the gumbo over rice. Perfect with a vinaigrette salad and a glass or three of good Merlot (the wine has to be robust to withstand the spices and enhance the meal) or a dark porter or stout if you prefer beer.

It gets thicker in the fridge over night, after you put it away following dinner. Some of the leftovers can be warmed in the microwave the next morning and placed into an omelette and the latter is then folded over from each side. I garnish this omelette with some fiery small green Thai peppers. Heaven on a plate.

Bon Appétit !

Here's a visual:

 
Last edited:

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Yes, in the same way that chili is a soup. They are both thick, rather than thin or watery. I'm sure you have had chili-stuffed omelettes.

A gumbo is a fairly thick soup/stew containing some form of meat, usually chicken, as well as andouille sausage, and shrimp. It also has okra (or file leaves) bell peppers, tomatoes, onions, and celery (I often toss in mushrooms). And the mix of spices we call Cajun seasoning -- containing red cayenne pepper, white pepper, black pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, thyme and bay leaf. Salt to taste. It is cooked in chicken stock, preferably home made. You can put all sorts of meats, including venison and rabbit in it.

One of the characteristic features of a gumbo is that it is made from a roux, which is carefully concocted from oil and flour, in a heavy pot. As the oil gets to the right temperature, flour is added and the mixture is constantly stirred as it cooks and darkens, until it has the right degree of brown coloration you desire -- it can be pale, intermediate, or very, very dark. If you burn the roux, then you toss that out (carefully, it is hot!) and start over. The other ingredients are added to this roux and then cooked over medium heat. You serve the gumbo over rice. Perfect with a vinaigrette salad and a glass or three of good Merlot
(the wine has to be robust to withstand the spices and enhance the meal) or a dark porter or stout if you prefer beer.

It gets thicker in the fridge over night, after you put it away following dinner. Some of the leftover can be warmed in the microwave the next morning and placed into an omelette and the latter is then folded over it from each side. I garnish this omelette with some fiery small green Thai peppers. Heaven on a plate.

Bon appetit!

Here's a visual:

Great video...very informative with the insider tips that are offered throughout! I can see a big pot of homemade gumbo at one of the Eagle Roosts near term family Sunday dinners. SWMBO has her mother's recipe for Gumbo! Thanks for sharing the above with us. ;)
 

drpeter

Super Member
May the extended Eagle Clan enjoy that big pot of homemade gumbo in good health for years to come. Happy New Year, my acquiline friend!

By the way, did I mention to you that there is a town in Italy, about two hours east of Rome in the Abruzzo mountains, called L'Aquila? Must be named after you.

It is one of the lovely towns that cling to the steep mountains of the region. My brother lived there for some years, doing research on neutrinos, which are particles created at the time of the Big Bang. A nearby mountain tunnel was closed off to traffic, and then they dug another tunnel into the mountain and set up detectors. Many universities were represented, as was MIT, the place where my brother worked. The mountain acts as a filter which stopped all other particles except neutrinos from coming through to the detectors. I visited the place in the early nineties, and it was like being on the set of a Bond movie.
 
Your email address will not be publicly visible. We will only use it to contact you to confirm your post.

IMPORTANT: BEFORE POSTING PLEASE CHECK THE DATE OF THE LAST POST OF THIS THREAD. IF IT'S VERY OLD, PLEASE CONSIDER REGISTERING FIRST, AND STARTING A NEW THREAD ABOUT THIS TOPIC.