Woofa

Super Member
Sad news. While I will always consider Connery to be Bond, my childhood was the Moore movies.
Love to hear your thought especially regarding his clothing.
 

Jgarner197

Senior Member
Sad news. While I will always consider Connery to be Bond, my childhood was the Moore movies.
Love to hear your thought especially regarding his clothing.
I agree with you as Connery will always be Bond to me. Tha being said the films with Sir Roger Moore were still entertaining. I loved the double breasted suits and jackets he frequently wore. I actually think I found I trace it back, he was the one that started my attraction to double breasted jackets. Every interview I can recall watching of him he was the epitome of class and an English Gentleman. He will be missed but forever remembered.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
RIP

For clothing, very trad clothing, his role as "The Saint" offered up his best wardrobe role as he had the unfortunate timing to play Bond in the sartorially challenged '70s. Also, "The Saint," for the time period, is a fun show with some amazing "guest stars."
 

127.72 MHz

Advanced Member
All things must pass and Mr. Moore had 89 years. He never took himself too seriously and claimed that his success was 99% luck.

Sir Roger was a credit to the United Kingdom.

Rest in peace Sir Roger.
 

Matt S

Connoisseur
RIP

For clothing, very trad clothing, his role as "The Saint" offered up his best wardrobe role as he had the unfortunate timing to play Bond in the sartorially challenged '70s. Also, "The Saint," for the time period, is a fun show with some amazing "guest stars."
I wouldn't say his clothes were particularly trad (the jacket cuts and shirts were quite anti-trad), but they were very 1960s and so creative.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
I wouldn't say his clothes were particularly trad (the jacket cuts and shirts were quite anti-trad), but they were very 1960s and so creative.
I have no doubt you are correct, I was referring to things he wore in the show (from my long-ago memory banks) like Harrington Jackets, canvas sneakers, button-down-collared shirts, club ties, desert boots, etc. Of course, it was a British wardrobe overall, but my memory, as noted, was a lot of trad stuff also.
 

Matt S

Connoisseur
I have no doubt you are correct, I was referring to things he wore in the show (from my long-ago memory banks) like Harrington Jackets, canvas sneakers, button-down-collared shirts, club ties, desert boots, etc. Of course, it was a British wardrobe overall, but my memory, as noted, was a lot of trad stuff also.
No canvas sneakers (there were canvas espadrilles) and never button-down collared shirts (other men occasionally wore them) on the show for Roger Moore, but there was plenty of the rest. Those were all British items first before the trads appropriated them. Moore wore a navy blazer in half the episodes, but it wasn't a trad blazer with the highly swelled chest and ticket pocket. The colour episodes featured a lot of new Edwardian style.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
No canvas sneakers (there were canvas espadrilles) and never button-down collared shirts (other men occasionally wore them) on the show for Roger Moore, but there was plenty of the rest. Those were all British items first before the trads appropriated them. Moore wore a navy blazer in half the episodes, but it wasn't a trad blazer with the highly swelled chest and ticket pocket. The colour episodes featured a lot of new Edwardian style.
I bow before superior knowledge as I know that my shaky old memory of the show can't hold a candle to your encyclopedia knowledge of it.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
No canvas sneakers (there were canvas espadrilles) and never button-down collared shirts (other men occasionally wore them) on the show for Roger Moore, but there was plenty of the rest. Those were all British items first before the trads appropriated them. Moore wore a navy blazer in half the episodes, but it wasn't a trad blazer with the highly swelled chest and ticket pocket. The colour episodes featured a lot of new Edwardian style.
I did find this picture ⇩ which the caption said was from "The Saint" show. No luck on the canvas sneakers yet - but if my memory is 50% accurate from so many years ago, I'll take it.

And please understand, I am serious that your knowledge of this stuff is incredible and far superior to my surface / shaky memory - I just had a strong image of him in a button-down-collared shirt from the show in my head (also canvas sneakers - but, again, so far no luck finding that - there are many fewer pictures of his footwear out there).

And heck, the image of the button-down-collared shirt might not be from "The Saint," but based on how old he looks in it, it seems about the right time period.

 

phyrpowr

Honors Member
The Bond portrayed by Moore was pretty much a parody, almost a caricature of Fleming's original, but I don't know who could've been better in it. It seemed like he knew it was a bit of a joke, but he was having a good time and wanted us to join in.
 

SG_67

Connoisseur
^ to be sure Moonraker and View To A Kill were among the worst Bond movies ever. That was not the fault of Roger Moore however. Unlike others, he seems to have had a lot of fun after no longer being the character and embracing it.

I remember a "Top Gear" special he did where they reviewed the Bond card and then tried making budget versions of them.
 
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Fading Fast

Connoisseur
^ to be sure Moonraker and View To A Kill were among the worst Bond movies ever. That was not the fault of Roger Moore however. Unlike others, he seems to have had a lot of fun after no longer being the character and embracing it.

I remember a "Top Gear" special he did where they reviewed the Bond card and then tried making budget versions of them.
The times, the writing, maybe his interpretation of the character, but his Bond movies were, for me (other than "The Spy Who Loved Me") the weakest ones, but that he embraced the roll afterwards says a lot.

It is a little exhausting all the angst some of the other former Bonds have about the role. I get there's a typecasting issue, but come on; they played Bond, made money, got women and became famous. So it comes with some baggage - I can think of a lot of worst things.

Moore's embrace of the role and its afterlife makes him likable and, IMHO, very mature about it all.
 

SG_67

Connoisseur
^ The Spy Who Loved Me, I thought, was quite good and chok full of Bond goodies like the Jet Ski, new for then, and the Lotus.

The Man With The Golden Gun, too, was good and I enjoyed the subplot with Maude Adams.
 
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