Sartorial Videos

Flanderian

Connoisseur
These two video reviews are reviews of the Yeossal brand of shoes. These shoes are the result of collaboration between the Singapore retailer Yeossal and Oriental shoe makers from Japan.

The first video is from The Elegant Oxford, and the second from Justin Fitzpatrick. They are both excellent, but the first one contains an unfortunate fundamental misstatement regarding an essential difference in construction between hand welted and Goodyear welted shoes. It states the difference is the difference between handsewn and machine sewn, and while that is one significant difference, there's another, perhaps even more significant one: Hand welted shoes are made by using a thicker insole into which the shoemaker hand cuts a lip to which the welt is sewn. Whereas Goodyear welted shoes have a rib of canvas, sometimes called the feather, glued to an insole or more rarely midsole, and the welt is then sewn to it.

There's been a great deal of debate as to the merit or detriments of each method. But irrespectively, it is a fundamental distinction in making.






Edit: Finished shoe trees look better, but I've found the unfinished variety to work better.
 
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eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Leonard Logsdail's story -



I cannot imagine anyone being able to watch the video above and not come out of it as a fan of Leonard Logsdail's . The sartorial world is a better place because all those early employers fired Logsdail, to the point that he eventually struck out on his own. The simplicity of his business philosophy is it's genius! ;)
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
I cannot imagine anyone being able to watch the video above and not come out of it as a fan of Leonard Logsdail's . The sartorial world is a better place because all those early employers fired Logsdail, to the point that he eventually struck out on his own. The simplicity of his business philosophy is it's genius! ;)

+1!

And he's cut some very handsome clothing. 👍
 

WA

Honors Member
In one of the Mahon - Dugdales videos, the weave comes up. Mahon mentions a little bit about sewing fewer pad stitches and probably some others. This depends on the purpose of what is wanted- purpose of achievement. And machine stitches kill opportunity of the iron. In the old days every stitch was pushed through with a thimble. Tailors were paid by the stitch and not by a general price. This is why poor people could go to a bespoke tailor. Rich people, not only got more stitches, if they wanted them, they also bought more clothes. Big cities gave room for specialist. The country tailor made whatever he could so he wouldn't have to plant potatoes, etc., to earn a living. How many of these small time tailors are still around? Some of these tailors are very good. Some understand why we wear clothes. (SR are statues clothes- snob.) (And, only the rich could buy fashions. That is where fashions come from.) Whatever tailor is chosen, pick one that can fit you well, no matter what the price is (higher price doesn't always mean better). Second, pick good cloth. That means the weave is 90 degrees, not even slightly off. Over time off bias weave will cause the clothes to fit poorly and look unpleasant, not to mention, become uncomfortable and, not last long.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
R rated for profanity. Do not play if offended by same. Mods, please delete if you deem it inappropriate.

My former tailor's, former shop. Very different clientele! :eek: Rented as location set after his retirement and its closure.

How many times I stood in front of that 3-way mirror, or went behind the frosted glass partition to try on trousers! How many $$$ I left there! :D

Bespoke is addictive.


 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
The two videos below are complimentary in their content. The top one is a discussion by Simon Crompton of his experiences in the differences between English and Neapolitan tailoring. And as you likely know, he has amassed a lot of experience.

The second is a presentation by Luca Rubinacci (In Italian so we can all practice our language skills! ;)) which, if you will bear with the subtitles ,is well worth the effort. Interesting too because the origin of The House of Rubinacci, a founder of the Neapolitan cut, stems from Luca's granpa Genaro who transported London style to Naples in the '30's, and reinterpreted it for the Neapolitan climate and tastes. So when Simon is talking about the traditional English cut, it's actually what's current fashion, rather at other times in its history.

I think the each tradition has much to offer, and while minimalist, the Rubinacci suit is rather spectacular in its own terms.





 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
For fans of Cheaney shoes. Which this somewhat older video taught me is pronounced Cheeney rather than Chainey as I had been mispronouncing it. Long owned by Church's, it was purchased a number of years ago by brothers from the Church family when Church's was sold to Prada.

Long a solid mid-quality English shoe, while still largely conservative, they have moved upmarket both in terms of quality and price. Nothing ever wrong with them, but finish and materials have gotten even a bit better. I consider myself blessed to have 3 pair, and they are particularly handsome, comfortable, beautifully made traditional English shoes.


 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
For fans of Cheaney shoes. Which this somewhat older video taught me is pronounced Cheeney rather than Chainey as I had been mispronouncing it. Long owned by Church's, it was purchased a number of years ago by brothers from the Church family when Church's was sold to Prada.

Long a solid mid-quality English shoe, while still largely conservative, they have moved upmarket both in terms of quality and price. Nothing ever wrong with them, but finish and materials have gotten even a bit better. I consider myself blessed to have 3 pair, and they are particularly handsome, comfortable, beautifully made traditional English shoes.



Another great video. True to my nature as 'The Manic Shoe Shopper', I do seem to more greatly enjoy the shoe construction/care/sales videos over the others dealing with garment construction, etc. As you confessed above, I too have been mispronouncing Cheaney shoes since I first became aware of them. I've greatly enjoyed the pair(s) on my shoe racks. ;)
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
Another great video. True to my nature as 'The Manic Shoe Shopper', I do seem to more greatly enjoy the shoe construction/care/sales videos over the others dealing with garment construction, etc. As you confessed above, I too have been mispronouncing Cheaney shoes since I first became aware of them. I've greatly enjoyed the pair(s) on my shoe racks. ;)

Glad you like them, I thoroughly enjoy them too! But for the sake of broader interest attempt to interleave them with clips on tailoring, for those with other interests.

A pair of Cheaney orphans on your shoe rack!? :eek:

Good heavens, it's never to late to acquire siblings! ;)
 
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