RM Bantista

Senior Member
OK, (doubt this will work, but it is what it is). Saw this in my browsing and stopped. And I thought of our group here as guests, interested in and appreciative of style.
https://images.thesartorialist.com/thumbnails/2012/01/11012Lino_4091Web.jpg
This gentleman knows what he is about. One may not find his distinction to be to one's own taste, but he is doing it all with deliberation and intent because he knows himself and the way he would present himself informally on the rialto on the day among people he may know.
Nice.
and good evening to you all,
rudy
 

Bjorn

Moderator
He pulls it off.

It doesn't come off as if he's trying too look young either, the fit seems right. Points for successfully wearing those double monks as well.

I doubt I could pull that off, but give me 20 years.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Kudos for the gentleman carrying off a decidedly distinct look, but when did well dressed gentlemen adopt the practice of jamming their scarves into a side pocket of their overcoats rather than draping them about their necks? Other than that one detail, a very pleasant photo, indeed. :icon_scratch:
 
I recently read about that gentleman at "The Rake." I believe his name is Lino Ieluzzi. He runs a haberdashery in Milan. The article I read credited him with starting this trend towards leaving one strap of a double monk shoe undone. It's near the bottom of this page, entitled "Live Like Lino": https://www.therakeonline.com/articles.php

I like the way he dresses, but I would compare his influence on current men's style to Quentin Tarantino's or Wes Anderson's influence on my fellow student filmmakers: he has a distinctive personal aesthetic, and he pulls it off very well, but he makes it look easier than it is. That leads to an awful lot of people imitating the idiosyncratic details of his look, rather than developing their own style with his influence.
 

Bjorn

Moderator
I recently read about that gentleman at "The Rake." I believe his name is Lino Ieluzzi. He runs a haberdashery in Milan. The article I read credited him with starting this trend towards leaving one strap of a double monk shoe undone. It's near the bottom of this page, entitled "Live Like Lino": https://www.therakeonline.com/articles.php

I like the way he dresses, but I would compare his influence on current men's style to Quentin Tarantino's or Wes Anderson's influence on my fellow student filmmakers: he has a distinctive personal aesthetic, and he pulls it off very well, but he makes it look easier than it is. That leads to an awful lot of people imitating the idiosyncratic details of his look, rather than developing their own style with his influence.
However, anyone who does not make it look easy isn't dressing well.
 

Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
As has been said, he pulls it off. Personally, I wouldn't touch that look with a ten-foot pole but must admit to vastly favoring the British style despite my Italian ancestry. However, he looks to be very pleased with himself . . . but needs a hat.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
OK, (doubt this will work, but it is what it is). Saw this in my browsing and stopped. And I thought of our group here as guests, interested in and appreciative of style.
https://images.thesartorialist.com/thumbnails/2012/01/11012Lino_4091Web.jpg
This gentleman knows what he is about. One may not find his distinction to be to one's own taste, but he is doing it all with deliberation and intent because he knows himself and the way he would present himself informally on the rialto on the day among people he may know.
Nice.
and good evening to you all,
rudy
Looks like an ad from 1973. But what's with the high-water pants?
 

Khnelben

Senior Member
this probably isn't the thread to discuss Lino Ieluzzi and Al Bazar in general, but as i know the man personally and can buy absolutely everything in his shop in Milan (apart from these contrast cap monks :), i can say he is very passionate and good at what he does.

he has his own style and most of the time it isn't as eccentric as some people beleive. he has a good facebook photo collection. see for yourselves.

Andrey
 

RM Bantista

Senior Member
this probably isn't the thread to discuss Lino Ieluzzi and Al Bazar in general, but as i know the man personally and can buy absolutely everything in his shop in Milan (apart from these contrast cap monks :), i can say he is very passionate and good at what he does.

he has his own style and most of the time it isn't as eccentric as some people beleive. he has a good facebook photo collection. see for yourselves.

Andrey
Andrey,
Should you see the gentleman, and if he is aware of his fame as variously described and deconstructed by casual observers who mean no disrespect in this discussion. Our care free manner, as you know, is somewhat as gracious as we may be, but we have only a great regard for a well appointed gentleman, and we will have a bit of fun with people, even when we appreciate them and their personal style. We would not wish to offend anyone, much less such a thoughtful gentleman as your acquaintance, whose reputation may not be known to myself, but is clearly established among the cognisanti. But then, I did think he only stopped to fasten the strap on his shoe against the wall, little did I know he was displaying a peculiarity of his own devise. Nice jacket though.
Regards to you and to your famously well-dressed acquaintance,
rudy
 

Horticulturalist

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I love this look. That man chooses to dress as an individual, good for him. He does not need a purple hat. The short trousers look great, give a sharp 60s look to the outfit. And it is clear from the way he dresses that the length of the trousers is a deliberate, personal choice. As for the scarf stuffed in the pocket and unbuckled monk straps? Pure sprezzatura!
 

Gurdon

Moderator
Ah ha!

I have been wondering how to work a double breasted jacket into the mix. It is difficult, as demonstrated by the examples in the recent Ben Silver catalog.

Don't know quite how to actually get hold of the right suit/jacket, but at least now I have a feel for the look. The local tailor I have been using has a predisposition to Italian-look suits. I think this might be right up his alley.

I really like the suit in the photos, the topcoat as well. Does Mr. Ieluzzi sell OTR or is it strictly custom-made? I have lots of tweed, but not enough warm weather jackets.

Regards,
Gurdon
 
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