knezz

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Your opinion on cuffs on seersucker and linen suits?

Seersucker yes or no?


Linen yes or no?
 

weckl

Suspended
I vote yes to both. The "cuffs weigh down the pant leg" rationale seems even stronger for lightweight fabrics, IMHO.
I agree. Yes on both. Uncuffed pants look silly, with rare exception (in fact, I can't think of an exception). Cuffed pants are grown-up pants. Uncuffed pants are strictly for jeans and chinos. And pajamas.
 

flatsixcrazy

New Member
This has been very confusing. So I went ahead and have one leg cuffed and the other sans-cuffs for all my pants. Now everyone is happy :icon_smile_wink:, and I want everyone to be happy with me.
 

CuffDaddy

Connoisseur
Yes to cuffs on both. Yes to cuffs on everything except formal wear.

To be clear, I am answering the question as to my opinion. The OP did not ask for a rule, and, to my knowledge, there is none.
 
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Srynerson

Super Member
I vote yes to both. The "cuffs weigh down the pant leg" rationale seems even stronger for lightweight fabrics, IMHO.
Based on some of the comments above, I feel that I should clarify that I said yes to cuffs on both based on practical reasons. I generally don't subscribe to the idea that cuffs are "right" or "wrong" for most types of attire. (Formal wear being the main exception since it is technically a uniform, but even then I wouldn't think twice about someone wearing cuffed pants with a dinner jacket.)
 

knezz

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
CuffDaddy should automatically be banned from responding to questions like this.

We all could predict his answer. ;-)
 

TMMKC

Honors Member
Generally, I cuff seersucker and leave linen plain.

Seersucker seems to take a cuff better than linen (linen cuffs tend to get droopy IMO). That told, I just purchased two new plain-front pairs of trousers (one seersucker and one linen) and did not have cuffs put on either. I am picking them up tomorrow!

The trousers with my seersucker suit do have cuffs.
 
G

Guest-466233

Guest
30 years as a men’s clothier here. With the exception of formalwear, cuffs are a personal preference and tend to change with trends. A general rule of thumb is plain front should have a plain bottom and pleated should have cuffs (pleated pants are currently out of style). The only exception to this general rule is seersucker and linen. Due to the lightweight fabric cuffs are recommended.
 

Andy

Site Creator/ Administrator
Staff member
30 years as a men’s clothier here. With the exception of formalwear, cuffs are a personal preference and tend to change with trends. A general rule of thumb is plain front should have a plain bottom and pleated should have cuffs (pleated pants are currently out of style). The only exception to this general rule is seersucker and linen. Due to the lightweight fabric cuffs are recommended.
Not quite in keeping with tradition. We try not to "change with trends" here. All pants (even if you've made the mistake of choosing flat front) should have cuffs with the exception of Formal trousers.

From the Encyclopedia of Men's Clothes:

Cuffs or “turn-ups” date to the 1860s when members of the Windsor cricket club began rolling up their trousers to protect them from mud and water. Consequently tennis players copied the look by rolling up their flannel trousers before hitting the courts.

English Royalty was seen in town wearing turn-ups and even to the Ascot races! British gentlemen began imitating the style, but the initial response was not positive.

There was pandemonium in the House of Parliament in 1893 when Viscount Lewisham appeared wearing cuffs on his trousers. Society disapproved of turn-ups, claiming that they collected dirt that would be brought indoors and that men had to take care to turn them down before entering a respectable indoor location.

The advantage of knee breeches worn in the 18th Century was that the hem was high enough off the ground that they were not likely to be soiled, and the stockings worn with knee breeches were much easier to launder.

But by 1880 tailors were stitching them onto trousers, and by the early 20th Century, cuffs had become an accepted variation on trouser bottoms.

Fashion Fundamental: Formal dress trousers are never cuffed, because there could not possibly be any chance of mud at a formal occasion!

And Pleated Trousers are NEVER and NEVER will be "out of style!" Otherwise how are you suppose to sit down! ??
 
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