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Andy

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Just tried this Jacques Pepin Recipe and it turned out well. I have some notes at the bottom as what I might do differently next time.

Sliced Tomato Gratin
Recipe from Heart & Soul in the Kitchen by Jacques Pépin.
Serves 4

2 pounds large ripe tomatoes
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 cups diced (1/2-inch) baguette or country bread
2/3 cup sliced shallots
1/3 cup sliced garlic
1 1/2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

Cut the tomatoes into 1/2-inch slices and arrange the slices in a 6- to 8-cup gratin dish. Sprinkle with 2 tablespoons of the oil.

Combine the bread, shallots, garlic, thyme, and the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a bowl and mix well. Sprinkle the salt and pepper on the tomatoes and top with the bread mixture.

Bake for about 25 minutes, until the tomatoes are browned on top and cooked. Serve.

NOTES:
I'd dice the tomatoes and cut the onions into smaller pieces (chopped or grated).
 
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Andy

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I really have always liked pork chops, but haven't had a good, chewable one for 8 years or so.

The pork people have evidently bought into the "fat is bad" erroneous theory and are breeding their pigs with no fat, thus no flavor or tenderness!
 

Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
I really have always liked pork chops, but haven't had a good, chewable one for 8 years or so.

The pork people have evidently bought into the "fat is bad" erroneous theory and are breeding their pigs with no fat, thus no flavor or tenderness!
Try buying your pork at a Chinese market like 99 Ranch or Han. The Chinese are very particular about their pork and it shows.
 

TKI67

Elite Member
I really have always liked pork chops, but haven't had a good, chewable one for 8 years or so.

The pork people have evidently bought into the "fat is bad" erroneous theory and are breeding their pigs with no fat, thus no flavor or tenderness!
Agreed. Pork has become chiefly a vehicle for other flavors, be they sauces as in this case, seasonings as in carnitas, or condiments, as in a Cubano.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
On Easter Sunday I will be slow roasting an 11 pound rack of pork that I'm pretty sure will melt in the collective mouths of our family and three of the grand kids friends. To a good degree, the tenderness of pork depends on how one chooses to roast it. At least I hope that will prove to be the case this weekend! LOL. ;)
 
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