andrewdc

Starting Member
I wear the same size as my father in law, who has retired and has started sending me suits. He dressed well, the four he sent are Oxxford and Ermenegildo Zegna. We both wear 46 regular. Trouser length isn't an issue, so the basic tailoring - take in the waist a bit, lengthen jacket sleeves if needed, take in sides of jacket a touch - are straightforward. My questions:

1. one suit has two small (2-3mm) moth holes near the hem. any tips or thoughts before I ask someone to re-weave those?

2. the trousers are pleated, and the circumference of the legs on a few of them are huge. I'll have to live with the pleats but would like to narrow the legs a bit. Any tips or thoughts to guide the tailor on narrowing the legs a bit without wrecking them, or will i have to live with the trousers as is?

thanks for any thoughts.
 

Old Road Dog

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Let me first mention your your good fortune to inherit such fine clothing. Let's look at the details about which you inquired:
Reweaving is an option if you can find a place to have that done. It was never inexpensive, but hopefully you can have that option. Remember, they need to take yarn from a sacrificial area of the garment, such as the leg seam selvedge. This could come from the off-cuts from narrowing the trousers.

I'm a little concerned about lengthening the sleeves as there could be a line of wear showing afterwards at the above the cuffs.

Narrowing the trouser bottons should involve both the inseam and outseam to avoid a twist in the trouser leg. You could also have the same worn line showing at the trouser bottom.

My advice is to have the tailor investigate these issues before he starts his alteration.
 

andrewdc

Starting Member
Let me first mention your your good fortune to inherit such fine clothing. Let's look at the details about which you inquired:
Reweaving is an option if you can find a place to have that done. It was never inexpensive, but hopefully you can have that option. Remember, they need to take yarn from a sacrificial area of the garment, such as the leg seam selvedge. This could come from the off-cuts from narrowing the trousers.

I'm a little concerned about lengthening the sleeves as there could be a line of wear showing afterwards at the above the cuffs.

Narrowing the trouser bottons should involve both the inseam and outseam to avoid a twist in the trouser leg. You could also have the same worn line showing at the trouser bottom.

My advice is to have the tailor investigate these issues before he starts his alteration.
thanks - the sleeves are necessary, unfortunately. i'm more concerned about recutting the trousers and may not do it. fortunately, the tailor is in a very good dry cleaner two days weekly, and that dry cleaner is the place to go, locally, to reweave a good suit.
 

andrewdc

Starting Member
For what it's worth, the tailor can narrow the trousers, and by slightly shortening and eliminating the cuff avoid wear lines. thanks for the advice.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
I agree with the others who say you are fortunate in getting these high quality suits. I have two thoughts:

First, I have used an outfit called Without a Trace in Chicago. They are pricey, but absolutely outstanding. After they did the reweaving, I had no way of telling where the mothhole had been, and I could not locate the place on the jacket from which they had picked out the threads for reweaving -- and this was in a jacket with a patterned cloth! Here is their website:


Second, how critical is it that you alter the trouser leg widths? The suit is of a piece, and the width of the trousers was meant to go with the cut of the jacket. In a time when both jackets and trousers were a touch more spacious, shall we say, the two components of the suit went together well. With narrowed legs and a still-spacious jacket, might the whole ensemble not look slightly incongruous? My suggestion is for you to put on the suit with an appropriate shirt and tie and put the usual things in the trouser pockets you normally carry when wearing a suit (I always carry my wallet, keys, change, and sterling silver handcuffs -- just a joke). Then take a careful look in the mirror and see how you feel about the suit. If you absolutely cannot live without narrowing down the trousers, then by all means, go ahead. But do remember that these styles and fashions change in the usual cyclical way, and, mark my words, your father-in-law's suit will be completely au courant a few years from now!

If I may be allowed a related digression: I was very close to my late father. Years ago as a teenager in India, I took some of his old trousers, bespoke ones made during colonial days in Malaya where he had worked, to my tailor. I wanted to wear his clothes, a nice way to honour him. The worsteds and tweeds were very fine and lightweight, made for tropical wear. All clothes in that part of the world were bespoke then, no ready-mades at all. My skilled and patient tailor completely took apart each of those baggy, pleated, Humphrey Bogart trousers with turn-ups, and recut and re-stitched them with narrow legs (7" bottoms, 14" around), no turn-ups and no pleats. I was 5'-8" and all of 115 lbs and those pants looked splendid on me after the tailor had done his job. Even my Dad was impressed, alhough he was not for the tighter style I chose. This tailor was someone who would take my collar and cuff designs cut on paper (including button-down styles then unknown in India) and create shirts based on them with unerring accuracy. And the cost? Next to nothing, compared to what one might have paid a tailor in England or the US, even during the 1960s.

End of story. Thanks for your patience. Do please let us know the outcome of your suit rehabilitation efforts. Good luck!
 
Your email address will not be publicly visible. We will only use it to contact you to confirm your post.

IMPORTANT: BEFORE POSTING PLEASE CHECK THE DATE OF THE LAST POST OF THIS THREAD. IF IT'S VERY OLD, PLEASE CONSIDER REGISTERING FIRST, AND STARTING A NEW THREAD ABOUT THIS TOPIC.