AldenPyle

Honors Member
In fact, there are a few good pictures of Hadden that illustrate East Coast style in the 1910s and 20s.
In high school
1914

1917-18 with Henry "Hank" Luce

 

Joe Beamish

Advanced Member
Short and tapered. You can't have one without the other.

Those early sacks were almost like shirts, like flannel shirts. Look at grandpa on the beach, and see the jacket on the mustachioed Brit in the printing room with Luce. Almost like shirts; talk about your natural shoulder.

As usual, all of these men look perfectly comfortable in their duds. They do not seem restricted anywhere; and yet, today so many men decline to wear ties and jackets because they're so uncomfortable. "No need to wear a tie, just be relaxed, be yourself", they tell each other.
 

Jovan

Honors Member
That's because they, like me, didn't grow up with comfortable clothes immediately available. The lowering of armholes and trouser rise has contributed to that. This is why I encourage my friends to thrift for old suits.
 

Joe Beamish

Advanced Member
Yes, but I think ill-fitting shirts are culprito numero uno. Men buy shirts in S-M-L-XL-XXL-XXXXXL sizes; they buy non-irons; and even while in ties they walk around in unbuttoned collars in revolt against a centuries-old conspiracy to make men uncomfortable in the workplace.

In the corporate world, it's always the same thing. Jackets and ties = discomfort and uptightness physically and creatively. They're fine when appropriate in client meetings and presentations, but otherwise "let's roll up our sleeves and get to work" is the overwhelming idea. Because everyone knows these clothes are brutally uncomfortable.

> Someone should market a line of clothing positioned squarely on comfort, plain and simple. That's the Trojan horse. The Greeks inside are lovely American traditional clothing....
 
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David V

Super Member
When did khakis "happen"? After WWII?

What a happy primer this stuff is for me. Thank you for posting, AP!
Khaki the color was adapted to British uniforms in India in the 1880's.

As for cotton twill pants of khaki color...probable migrated to the civilian population after WWII.
 

AldenPyle

Honors Member
Yale Graduate 1949

Here's a picture of a Yale University graduate in 1949. Note how much this jacket looks like the one in the 1947 J.Press ad.
 

Reds & Tops

Senior Member
Yes, but I think ill-fitting shirts are culprito numero uno. Men buy shirts in S-M-L-XL-XXL-XXXXXL sizes; they buy non-irons; and even while in ties they walk around in unbuttoned collars in revolt against a centuries-old conspiracy to make men uncomfortable in the workplace.

In the corporate world, it's always the same thing. Jackets and ties = discomfort and uptightness physically and creatively. They're fine when appropriate in client meetings and presentations, but otherwise "let's roll up our sleeves and get to work" is the overwhelming idea. Because everyone knows these clothes are brutally uncomfortable.

> Someone should market a line of clothing positioned squarely on comfort, plain and simple. That's the Trojan horse. The Greeks inside are lovely American traditional clothing....
I just re-read this post, and was struck at how spot on it really is.
 

P Hudson

Super Member
Side vents at Yale! I wonder how often they were considered acceptable by the TNSIL crowd. I think of them as much better paired with the British ideal of a padded shoulder. I don't have anything with a good shoulder that has side vents except for an Italian linen suit that is relatively unpadded.
 

AldenPyle

Honors Member
Side vents at Yale! I wonder how often they were considered acceptable by the TNSIL crowd. I think of them as much better paired with the British ideal of a padded shoulder. I don't have anything with a good shoulder that has side vents except for an Italian linen suit that is relatively unpadded.
There was a boom for side vented natural shouldered jackets in the early 1960's, kind of a bastard child of the Ivy League look and the Continental. As recently as a couple of years ago, Southwick had a side-vented sack model. Bobby Jones also was selling side-vented Made in Italy sacks with an extremely soft shoulder.

I still think that the tweed sport jackets in general were looked on as a British look and were over the 1930's modified according to the Brooks cut.
 

Trousers

Starting Member
Well done, AldenPyle! A suggestion...

I think it's possible, even probable, that the credit you give to J. Press belongs to Langrock instead. Langrock (est. 1898) predates J. Press by a mere four years, but it successfully promoted the "new" sack suit look from the get-go. Furthermore, Langrock was then considered more upper crust --and therefore more desirable (and influential?)-- than J. Press. For starters, Jacopi Press was Jewish; David Langrock was not. In less enlightened times, such a fact mattered to trendsetting bluebloods.

J. Press then did what it had to do: it copied Langrock's merchandise styles. Time passed, the student body grew more diverse, and J. Press began to seem more attractive. Langrock tried to hold its place on Mount Olympus, but never became iconic beyond its declining circle of patrons. Meanwhile, J. Press became a byword for the Ivy look. Such is retail.

.
BTW, David Langrock was 100% Jewish!
Also, there is a "Langrock Way" in Burlington, NJ. Does anyone know if it was named for the chain of Langrock clothes shops?
 
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