Doctor Damage

Connoisseur
I'm old enough to remember that last time the style world was predicting the end of suits, etc. Then we had a resurgence in suit wearing in the 2000s to date. Waves, cycles, whatever. Suits will be back. The After Times will look at lot like the Before Times, although many individuals and businesses will have realized they don't need as "much" as they did.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
I have worn a wool suit and wool thermals, while standing in the sun at a service, plus Opa's DB in Summer, neither time vigorously sweating. Guess do run cold. :p

On a serious note, figured the weather, however, you know what they say about assuming. ;) What about a dark suit in a cotton or linen?
During the summers here in central Floride I wear only my khaki, navy and loden hued cotton poplin suits and my Seersucker navy/white suit. During the winter months each year I get a few wears out of my wool suits and other garments. I am one who doesn't handle the heat well...I just sweat a lot! ;)
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
During the summers here in central Florida I wear only my khaki, navy and loden hued cotton poplin suits and my Seersucker navy/white suit. During the winter months each year I get a few wears out of my wool suits and other garments. I am one who doesn't handle the heat well...I just sweat a lot! ;)
Ah, well, sorry you are one who runs hot. I too sweat a lot, at least told that, however, it is anxiety. Better than not sweating, knew someone like that and said makes it hotter, no evaporative cooling.

Humid heat is far worse than dry heat, with the latter can use evaporative cooling. Why glad moving to Texas didn't work out.
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
The articles from my research on a post before this one, maybe of interest to others?

There are plenty more, these were the few which are the better ones.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
The gentleman pictured below was featured in a WSJ article this morning on the re-opening of New York City schools. He's a math teacher, a "programmer" (creates course schedules for his high school) and a chapter leader for his teachers union.

From the article, he sounds like a smart, engaged teacher and administrator trying to do his job well. And nothing about his pictured really surprised me until I thought about it in light of comments here at AAAC.

When I was growing up in the '70s, most teachers, especially the older ones, wore ties and jackets or, at least, jackets with dress trousers. Some of the real younger guys skipped the jackets and ties and wore collared-shirts and chinos (my memory isn't clear on jeans on teachers in high school).

And if one of them was going to be pictured in the newspaper, you can bet he'd have put on a tie and sport coat or even a tie and suit that day - plus had his hair combed well, etc.

Again, IMO, in 2020, there is nothing wrong with how this gentleman chose to dress. But it does say a lot about our current clothing norms that a teacher getting his picture in a national newspaper chose to wear an open-collared, short-sleeve, chambray shirt untucked over a pair of (hard to tell) gray chinos and with a baseball cap.

So, while we debate this or that, this picture, for me, said a lot about the current acceptance of both short-sleeve shirts, untucked shirts and baseball caps in a professional setting and, equally, the decline of ties, suits, sport coats and dress trousers.
im-222978.jpeg
 

smmrfld

Super Member
The gentleman pictured below was featured in a WSJ article this morning on the re-opening of New York City schools. He's a math teacher, a "programmer" (creates course schedules for his high school) and a chapter leader for his teachers union.

From the article, he sounds like a smart, engaged teacher and administrator trying to do his job well. And nothing about his pictured really surprised me until I thought about it in light of comments here at AAAC.

When I was growing up in the '70s, most teachers, especially the older ones, wore ties and jackets or, at least, jackets with dress trousers. Some of the real younger guys skipped the jackets and ties and wore collared-shirts and chinos (my memory isn't clear on jeans on teachers in high school).

And if one of them was going to be pictured in the newspaper, you can bet he'd have put on a tie and sport coat or even a tie and suit that day - plus had his hair combed well, etc.

Again, IMO, in 2020, there is nothing wrong with how this gentleman chose to dress. But it does say a lot about our current clothing norms that a teacher getting his picture in a national newspaper chose to wear an open-collared, short-sleeve, chambray shirt untucked over a pair of (hard to tell) gray chinos and with a baseball cap.

So, while we debate this or that, this picture, for me, said a lot about the current acceptance of both short-sleeve shirts, untucked shirts and baseball caps in a professional setting and, equally, the decline of ties, suits, sport coats and dress trousers.
View attachment 48532
If he's serving his students well, engaging them, and helping them grow, then what he's wearing makes no difference, within reason, IMO.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
If he's serving his students well, engaging them, and helping them grow, then what he's wearing makes no difference, within reason, IMO.
I believe that is consistent with the spirit of my comments. I noted that I thought his attire was fine, just also thought it was an interesting example - highlights by the fact that this person was getting his picture in a national newspaper - of how much dress norms have changed.
 

smmrfld

Super Member
I believe that is consistent with the spirit of my comments. I noted that I thought his attire was fine, just also thought it was an interesting example - highlights by the fact that this person was getting his picture in a national newspaper - of how much dress norms have changed.
Yes, and wearing a suit or sportcoat and tie just for a pic would likely feel like a costume if that isn't his normal attire.
 

katon

Super Member
In looking back on events from the past, there is a common pitfall known as "presentism", that is, looking at the past through the mores of the present. This can make some things harder to see.

If you were to ask folks who came of age in the 30s what they thought of Trad style, they'd be against it -- college kids can wear college kid clothes, but when they graduate they ought to dress like a businessman in a tailored English suit rather than off-the-rack blazers, or fooling around with army surplus khakis. The big rebellion was deciding, "No, the clothes we are wearing now are just fine; the clothes we wear recognize the past but don't need to repeat it so closely." :) The same thing has happened again and again since then.

Over time, this causes a formality drift, as what you thought was traditional when you were younger slowly floats upward into ceremonial, and the sort of everyday casual clothes that you decided on when you were younger that you happened to stick with become the new traditional.
 

blue suede shoes

Super Member
For a teacher, he looks like crap. If he were on his way to a rodeo, he would be dressed just fine.

He needs to put on a white shirt and tie and look like a teacher. As dress standards for teachers have declined over the years, respect for teachers has also declined. One cannot convince me that there is no correlation.

I'll have to read the Journal more closely as I didn't see the article. On second thought, I'm glad I missed it.
 

Charles Dana

Honors Member
For a teacher, he looks like crap. If he were on his way to a rodeo, he would be dressed just fine. He needs to put on a white shirt and tie and look like a teacher.
He’s dressed the way male teachers dress these days. When I was in junior high school in the late 1960s, all of the male teachers at my school (except for the ones in the physical education department) wore neckties and white shirts. Even the metal shop and wood shop teachers wore them.

But it’s not 1968 any more.

As dress standards for teachers have declined over the years, respect for teachers has also declined. One cannot convince me that there is no correlation.
Though I can’t prove it, my guess is that the decline in respect for teachers—in those schools where there has been a decline—has less to do with how teachers dress and more to do with an unhealthy over-sensitivity on the part of society to the feelings of children. (It would be nice if teachers would go back to dressing like grown-ups, but that train has left the station.) A curriculum that demands a lot from children will get it, even if the teachers dress casually. (That’s a well-known fact that I made up just 10 seconds ago.)
 
Last edited:

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
For a teacher, he looks like crap. If he were on his way to a rodeo, he would be dressed just fine.

He needs to put on a white shirt and tie and look like a teacher. As dress standards for teachers have declined over the years, respect for teachers has also declined. One cannot convince me that there is no correlation.

I'll have to read the Journal more closely as I didn't see the article. On second thought, I'm glad I missed it.
If it helps, the article was in the on-line version in the "Greater New York" section. I haven't read a physical copy in (I was going to type "years," but then realized it's been) decades, so maybe it wasn't in your paper if you're reading a physical copy.


...(That’s a well-known fact that I made up just 10 seconds ago.)
LOL
 

Bermuda

Senior Member
No ties and blazers for me this year at my school building. I will be completely virtual with my students working from home. Mostly khakis and OCBDs
 

jackcatscal

Starting Member
The gentleman pictured below was featured in a WSJ article this morning on the re-opening of New York City schools. He's a math teacher, a "programmer" (creates course schedules for his high school) and a chapter leader for his teachers union.

From the article, he sounds like a smart, engaged teacher and administrator trying to do his job well. And nothing about his pictured really surprised me until I thought about it in light of comments here at AAAC.

When I was growing up in the '70s, most teachers, especially the older ones, wore ties and jackets or, at least, jackets with dress trousers. Some of the real younger guys skipped the jackets and ties and wore collared-shirts and chinos (my memory isn't clear on jeans on teachers in high school).

And if one of them was going to be pictured in the newspaper, you can bet he'd have put on a tie and sport coat or even a tie and suit that day - plus had his hair combed well, etc.

Again, IMO, in 2020, there is nothing wrong with how this gentleman chose to dress. But it does say a lot about our current clothing norms that a teacher getting his picture in a national newspaper chose to wear an open-collared, short-sleeve, chambray shirt untucked over a pair of (hard to tell) gray chinos and with a baseball cap.

So, while we debate this or that, this picture, for me, said a lot about the current acceptance of both short-sleeve shirts, untucked shirts and baseball caps in a professional setting and, equally, the decline of ties, suits, sport coats and dress trousers.
View attachment 48532
I have a baseball cap story. A number of years ago, a very beautiful young woman complimented the fedora I was wearing. (And, by young, I mean probably two generations younger than me.) I told her I wore a hat every day, and that I had a pretty good collection of them. I said I also had a batch of baseball caps, but I didn’t wear them very often. She said that no man over the age of 14 should wear a baseball cap. That cinched it for me.
 

Beefeater

Senior Member
I live in South Florida now, West Palm Beach to be exact. I came from Dallas, TX, not exactly the suit wearing bastion it was in the 80s. When the pandemic hit and I had to work from home, admittedly I got lazy and traded in my Press OCBD and khakis for shorts and polo shirts, albeit tucked in and still ironed. The south Florida summer kind of backed me up on the choice.
My sack suits have been gathering dust as have my Aldens. With the advent of fall however, I am turning over a new leaf (pun intended) and have a trip planned to northern VA to get back in the game. Since the pandemic hit I have ordered 4 new repp ties from BB (Stocking up since the bankruptcy) and a suit and sports jacket from J. Press. Wife thinks I am crazy. She is half right.
 

drpeter

Senior Member
More power to you!

I am reminded of Anthony Quinn in the persona of Zorba the Greek, saying to Alan Bates: "A man needs a little madness...or else he never gets to cut the rope and be free." It's a great scene, and you might want to show it to your wife. There's a pristine white/cream suit that Bates is wearing, and you could tell her it's from J Press, LOL.

 

Color 8

Senior Member
1. When a guy over 25 is never, ever seen without a baseball cap on his head, he is almost certainly going bald.

2. I've worn suits to funerals where the deceased was laid out in his favorite team's hockey jersey ; I've worn suits to evening weddings that were attended by guests in short-sleeve polos ; I will continue to wear a suit to the orchestra, even if every other person there is in swim trunks and a beanie with a propeller on top. I am past worrying about what other people do.
 

The Irishman

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I would have tended to fall into the camp of those who note that reports of "the death of the suit" usually turn out to be premature.

However... I do wonder if the events of the past year could be a tipping point - at least as the suit relates to work wear.

If we stretch into a second or even a third year of many people working from home, and without wearing suits, I think it becomes more credible that lasting changes will occur in terms of the dress habits of many work forces. Even without a continued pandemic it could be that there will economic and social forces that will lead to a greater remote working culture in the future.

Habit is a very powerful process, I'm thinking of books ike Duhigg's 'The Power of Habit' which could be indicative of the effect of a persistent daily change to business dress might have. The longer this goes on the greater the likelihood it will be an enduring shift. I guess the ground is already laid in terms of the increasingly casual dress in the workplace that was already evident. This could just copper fasten a trend - maybe push us a further ten years forward towards the future that was already coming.

If I'm right, this is not to say that the suit would not remain relatively popular outside of the work context for formal occasions or when worn for leisure.
 
Last edited:
Your email address will not be publicly visible. We will only use it to contact you to confirm your post.

IMPORTANT: BEFORE POSTING PLEASE CHECK THE DATE OF THE LAST POST OF THIS THREAD. IF IT'S VERY OLD, PLEASE CONSIDER REGISTERING FIRST, AND STARTING A NEW THREAD ABOUT THIS TOPIC.