Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
I was searching about for a place to tuck this enjoyable J.Press blog post by Richard Press (grandson of Jacobi Press, founder of J.Press) and settled on this thread, but it's really just a fun memory of a time when dressing well meant more to men:

https://jpressonline.com/blogs/threading-the-needle-with-richard-press/the-art-of-wearing-clothes?utm_campaign=TTN: Art of Wearing Clothes 12.14 (QTZKAL)&utm_medium=email&utm_source=email&_ke=eyJrbF9lbWFpbCI6ICJta2FobjIyQGdtYWlsLmNvbSIsICJrbF9jb21wYW55X2lkIjogIk1oZmIzNCJ9
Thanks for posting this, in part a reminder to come and see if anything been going on here, last I looked was quiet. I don't quite understand the post, seems more of digging up old discord, however, also mentions a time when this fellow nominated several people as well dressed. Why tease us about this article, could they have at least provided a link to read the original?
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
I'm not sure how many know of Kirby Allison' YouTube channel, they have filmed an update series on London including several tailors. These clients are obviously wealthy, yet, apparently the trend is for separates and unique pieces. This latter category can be simply more interesting and casual fabrics, to pieces inspired by movies and history, to the bold, like pink corduroy three piece suits. Wonder if there is anything like this happing in New York or other big cities?
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
Adriel! Nice to hear from you. Don’t be a stranger.
Good to see you Charles, too! :)

With the forum being quiet, having surgery, and now with COVID and pneumonia, doesn't seem like I can contribute or have anything to bring to conversation. I am still going to finish a project, first though, I want to finish making a new ironing board cover for my Oma's 1940s ironing board. I don't understand why I don't have the energy to get more than one or two things done in a day. Hey, at least I am now out of hospital and not stuck in a bed!
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
Adriel, I had no idea you were laid up in the hospital with COVID and pneumonia. Thank goodness you’re on the mend. I hope you quickly regain your strength and stamina. Best of luck to you.
I guess didn't cross my mind to say anything. Thank you for the well wishes, the strength is coming back.

By the way, the ironing board cover is now done and despite my first time not using a pattern (all the old covers were the wrong size) and not knowing how to add for the padding (who needs instructions or tutorials), it actually fits well and I am very satisfied. I'm going to be going to sleep with a smile on my face. Oft it is the simple things that gives one the greatest pleasures.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Good to see you Charles, too! :)

With the forum being quiet, having surgery, and now with COVID and pneumonia, doesn't seem like I can contribute or have anything to bring to conversation. I am still going to finish a project, first though, I want to finish making a new ironing board cover for my Oma's 1940s ironing board. I don't understand why I don't have the energy to get more than one or two things done in a day. Hey, at least I am now out of hospital and not stuck in a bed!
I am very sorry to hear of your health issues. I hope your strength and stamina return.
 
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eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
I guess didn't cross my mind to say anything. Thank you for the well wishes, the strength is coming back.

By the way, the ironing board cover is now done and despite my first time not using a pattern (all the old covers were the wrong size) and not knowing how to add for the padding (who needs instructions or tutorials), it actually fits well and I am very satisfied. I'm going to be going to sleep with a smile on my face. Oft it is the simple things that gives one the greatest pleasures.
Stay on the mend, my friend an may you enjoy a speedy and complete recovery. We will keep you in our prayers. ;)
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
I am very sorry to hear of your health issues. I hope your strength and stamina returns.
Thank you for the well wishes. :) OT starts next week, we are scheduled for twice a week.

Stay on the mend, my friend an may you enjoy a speedy and complete recovery. We will keep you in our prayers. ;)
Thank you for the concern and prayers. :)


To be back on topic, I say one of the more difficult things been my appearance in front of all these strangers. I feel awkward seeing all these people without a sport coat on, especially my doctor who always wears a a tie. So then for those who were not working, how has the pandemic, especially now that it has been so long, affected your clothing?
 

drpeter

Super Member
Being retired, I wore sports jackets and khakis or grey flannels to appointments, lunches and other outings before the pandemic, and continue to do that. I often wore them and other somewhat formal clothing when shopping for books or other things.

Pre-pandemic, I used to go down to Madison often for a day of library browsing, book shopping, and a restaurant lunch and/or dinner with my lovely young friend Mollie, who lives there. I usually dressed up a little, like sportcoats or blazers with grey flannels or khakis or odd trousers for the Madison outing. I've also worn ties now and then, and sometimes ties with sweaters. I still do the Madison trip, but not as often, and sometimes my lady friend is kind enough to come up and visit me here, where I entertain her with a nice meal. She dresses up now and then, but appreciates my dressing nicely for her.
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
Being retired, I wore sports jackets and khakis or grey flannels to appointments, lunches and other outings before the pandemic, and continue to do that. I often wore them and other somewhat formal clothing when shopping for books or other things.

Pre-pandemic, I used to go down to Madison often for a day of library browsing, book shopping, and a restaurant lunch and/or dinner with my lovely young friend Mollie, who lives there. I usually dressed up a little, like sportcoats or blazers with grey flannels or khakis or odd trousers for the Madison outing. I've also worn ties now and then, and sometimes ties with sweaters. I still do the Madison trip, but not as often, and sometimes my lady friend is kind enough to come up and visit me here, where I entertain her with a nice meal. She dresses up now and then, but appreciates my dressing nicely for her.
Good having a female companion, myself made it so I was too busy for such. Even better that you two still can still enjoy time together.

What kind books is your interest? Have a library? I think books can say a lot about someone.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Yes, female company is wonderful, especially when it is an occasional event. I am perfectly happy in my solitude, but when I wish for company, I have plenty of friends, both female and male! It's partly because I am an academic who lives in a small college town.

As for books, I have close to 6000 of them, perhaps more. I collect first editions seriously, and have first printings and signed books of authors I love, like Graham Greene, Lawrence Durrell, John Fowles and Michael Ondaatje. I love Joseph Conrad but his first editions are a bit beyond my budget as a retired professor, although I have two or three. Apart from fiction, I also have books in my discipline (cognitive neuroscience and cognitive psychology) and other areas -- science and mathematics (my undergraduate major), philosophy, history especially military history, dictionaries, books on maps, books on art, especially almost all the books published on Max Beckmann and Joseph Cornell, books on film, many translations of Greek, Roman and Indian (Sanskrit) classics and even a small collection of erotica. Books on clothes too! And almost 700 films on DVD and Blu Ray. Tons of vinyl and CDs. I need a second flat to store all these collections!

You can judge for yourself what kind of man I am from the list above. Very many interests. Part of the reason is that I write -- fiction and poetry on widely different topics. I'm currently looking at literary agents in the UK. I had one in New York for a while, but she could not find a publisher for me, although Random House came close. I have two completed novels on the War in Japanese-Occupied Malaya, and the insurrection of the fifties (I grew up there in that incendiary time). I have four others in progress: on a film director in India in the sixties; on an epidemic of amnesia in the 22nd century (started eighteen months ago, well before our own pandemic); on a rare stamp and folks hunting for it set in Nazi Germany and modern-day Ecuador and Holland; and finally, on eroticism and philosophy, a fictional study of an intimate relationship between a man and a woman, set in Friday Harbor, one of the loveliest places I have seen.

I also have almost 100 stamp albums, another serious interest. So I have about 70 or 80 books on philatelic subjects. I have given talks on philately at various institutions and was elected a member of the oldest stamp club in the world, the Royal Philatelic Society of London (150 years old in 2019). I'm also a member (by invitation after I gave a talk there on British Empire stamps) of Collectors Club of Chicago and Collectors Club New York.

So it is a pretty rich life. I have not minded the Covid lockdown at all, because I have so much to do at home and am perfectly content doing these things. It's a good arrangement, as long as I don't succumb to the disease!
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
Yes, female company is wonderful, especially when it is an occasional event. I am perfectly happy in my solitude, but when I wish for company, I have plenty of friends, both female and male! It's partly because I am an academic who lives in a small college town.
I think I understand, as I have friends, though they are typical in most are too busy for getting together. As I have gotten older, I have learned to let these folks go and instead spend time with those who have the time. I don't need or want a lot, just now and then.


As for books, I have close to 6000 of them, perhaps more. I collect first editions seriously, and have first printings and signed books of authors I love, like Graham Greene, Lawrence Durrell, John Fowles and Michael Ondaatje. I love Joseph Conrad but his first editions are a bit beyond my budget as a retired professor, although I have two or three. Apart from fiction, I also have books in my discipline (cognitive neuroscience and cognitive psychology) and other areas -- science and mathematics (my undergraduate major), philosophy, history especially military history, dictionaries, books on maps, books on art, especially almost all the books published on Max Beckmann and Joseph Cornell, books on film, many translations of Greek, Roman and Indian (Sanskrit) classics and even a small collection of erotica. Books on clothes too! And almost 700 films on DVD and Blu Ray. Tons of vinyl and CDs. I need a second flat to store all these collections!
What an interesting collection and focus on first editions.

I thought Dad had a lot of books at about 4,000, took us two Brothers weeks to do a high level sorting. So, I can imagine very easily how much space this takes up, must fill every part of the home, how nice. I love my home like this, books in all the rooms but the bathrooms, however, I been trimming my library because I don't want to leave more of a burden then have to (ex. if isn't going to be read again it is rehomed).

And by the way, I do have a LP collection, maybe just 50 or so. I much prefer the sound over CDs, especially played through vintage equipment (I have two German consoles, one horizontal and one vertical, plus a pair of Jenson cabinet speakers which were going in the trash).


You can judge for yourself what kind of man I am from the list above. Very many interests. Part of the reason is that I write -- fiction and poetry on widely different topics. I'm currently looking at literary agents in the UK. I had one in New York for a while, but she could not find a publisher for me, although Random House came close. I have two completed novels on the War in Japanese-Occupied Malaya, and the insurrection of the fifties (I grew up there in that incendiary time). I have four others in progress: on a film director in India in the sixties; on an epidemic of amnesia in the 22nd century (started eighteen months ago, well before our own pandemic); on a rare stamp and folks hunting for it set in Nazi Germany and modern-day Ecuador and Holland; and finally, on eroticism and philosophy, a fictional study of an intimate relationship between a man and a woman, set in Friday Harbor, one of the loveliest places I have seen.
One should have interest in many topics, especially as an author. I find this very fascinating how we here go about talking about clothes, not knowing what interesting and accomplished people are among us. And quite a varied range of topics you write on, how intriguing.


I also have almost 100 stamp albums, another serious interest. So I have about 70 or 80 books on philatelic subjects. I have given talks on philately at various institutions and was elected a member of the oldest stamp club in the world, the Royal Philatelic Society of London (150 years old in 2019). I'm also a member (by invitation after I gave a talk there on British Empire stamps) of Collectors Club of Chicago and Collectors Club New York.
Here I thought stamp collecting was basically dead. I have wondered when society stops using stamps how it will affect collectors.

I have something weird and fun to share regarding stamps. Quick background first, though. My Parents had a nasty divorce and stuff went missing, either bio Mother didn't keep paying for storage units or was in a unit Dad tossed stuff in, which he later had to get rid of when she took him to cleaners again at age 71. Fast forward to clearing out the house after he passed away and sitting in a pile of stuff was my Maternal Grandmother's stamp album! :oops: What is weird is how it ended up in Dad's possession and why he would save it, yet put all the other stuff from the unit outside in the rain. Our family is just glad the history was preserved and not lost, it will stay in the family.


So it is a pretty rich life. I have not minded the Covid lockdown at all, because I have so much to do at home and am perfectly content doing these things. It's a good arrangement, as long as I don't succumb to the disease!
No kidding! I agree, the lockdown has not affected me either. We seem to both have enjoyed the more secluded and quiet life, so no real difference during this lockdown. As to getting COVID, as I found out, the only way to not get it is to stay home, face masks and cleaning don't keep it away.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Thanks for the kind words. Since you mentioned your audio systems, I thought I would list the three systems I have or had. The second vintage system is actually now in my basement storage unit -- not enough space after I moved from my old flat into a new one! The Cambridge Sonata CD player from this second system has been integrated into the first vintage system in place of the Tascam cassette player. I had a stereo in every room in my two bedroom flat until I moved to my new digs in 2016 -- still two bedrooms, but somewhat smaller. I have cut and pasted the document I created some years ago after I had set up all three systems with the help of a very skilled friend who routinely builds his own speakers.

AUDIO SYSTEMS

System Components are all vintage except when specified as new. The Modern System is built with entirely new (circa 2008) components

First Vintage System (VS-1):

Marantz 2220B Receiver and Integrated Amplifier
Dual CS 5000 Turntable with Ortofon X3-MC cartridge
Nakamichi Dragon 3-head Cassette Deck (Serial No. 19599)
Tascam 122 Mk III 3-head Cassette Deck
Revox B77 Mk I Reel-to-Reel Tape Recorder with Operational Smoked-Acrylic Cover
New Polk Audio RTi A3 bookshelf speakers
Two New Custom-Made Oak Speaker Stands with Hand-Milled Points

Second Vintage System (VS-2):

Nakamichi RE2 Receiver Integrated Amplifier
Dual CS 5000 Turntable with Audio Technica cartridge
Nakamichi CR-1A 2-head cassette deck (currently unconnected)
Nakamichi CR-3 3-head cassette deck
Celestion MP1 bookshelf speakers
New Cambridge Audio Sonata CD30 player (with a Wolfson WM8716 24-bit DAC)
Polk Audio PSW10 10” (100W 35Hz—200Hz) Powered Subwoofer

**NB: The “A” designation after CR-1 or other letter/number codes for Nakamichi indicates it is for the Americas

Modern System (MS-1):

Panasonic 50” Viera TH-50PZ80U Plasma Screen (2008)
Marantz Surround AV Receiver SR5003 (SN: 000836004534)
Focal Chorus 5.1 Audio Surround Sound System (2008)
(Saint-Etienne, France)
Two Chorus 706V Front Speakers
Chorus CC 700V Center Channel
Chorus SW 700V Subwoofer
Two Chorus SR 700V Rear Speakers
Two Bowers & Wilkins STAV24 Front Speaker Stands with Hand-Milled Points
Panasonic DMP-BD35 Universal/BluRay Player (2008)
Denon DP-300F Automated Turntable (2013)

Headphones:

New Sennheiser HD-600 Open Dynamic Professional Stereo Headphones (2009)
New Sennheiser RS 126 Stereo Headphones (2018)
 
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Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
Thanks for the kind words. Since you mentioned your audio systems, I thought I would list the three systems I have or had. The second vintage system is actually now in my basement storage unit -- not enough space after I moved from my old flat into a new one! The Cambridge Sonata CD player from this second system has been integrated into the first vintage system in place of the Tascam cassette player. I had a stereo in every room in my two bedroom flat until I moved to my new digs in 2016 -- still two bedrooms, but somewhat smaller. I have cut and pasted the document I created some years ago after I had set up all three systems with the help of a very skilled friend who routinely builds his own speakers.

AUDIO SYSTEMS

System Components are all vintage except when specified as new. The Modern System is built with entirely new (circa 2008) components

First Vintage System (VS-1):

Marantz 2220B Receiver and Integrated Amplifier
Dual CS 5000 Turntable with Ortofon X3-MC cartridge
Nakamichi Dragon 3-head Cassette Deck (Serial No. 19599)
Tascam 122 Mk III 3-head Cassette Deck
Revox B77 Mk I Reel-to-Reel Tape Recorder with Operational Smoked-Acrylic Cover
New Polk Audio RTi A3 bookshelf speakers
Two New Custom-Made Oak Speaker Stands with Hand-Milled Points

Second Vintage System (VS-2):

Nakamichi RE2 Receiver Integrated Amplifier
Dual CS 5000 Turntable with Audio Technica cartridge
Nakamichi CR-1A 2-head cassette deck (currently unconnected)
Nakamichi CR-3 3-head cassette deck
Celestion MP1 bookshelf speakers
New Cambridge Audio Sonata CD30 player (with a Wolfson WM8716 24-bit DAC)
Polk Audio PSW10 10” (100W 35Hz—200Hz) Powered Subwoofer

**NB: The “A” designation after CR-1 or other letter/number codes for Nakamichi indicates it is for the Americas

Modern System (MS-1):

Panasonic 50” Viera TH-50PZ80U Plasma Screen (2008)
Marantz Surround AV Receiver SR5003 (SN: 000836004534)
Focal Chorus 5.1 Audio Surround Sound System (2008)
(Saint-Etienne, France)
Two Chorus 706V Front Speakers
Chorus CC 700V Center Channel
Chorus SW 700V Subwoofer
Two Chorus SR 700V Rear Speakers
Two Bowers & Wilkins STAV24 Front Speaker Stands with Hand-Milled Points
Panasonic DMP-BD35 Universal/BluRay Player (2008)
Denon DP-300F Automated Turntable (2013)

Headphones:

New Sennheiser HD-600 Open Dynamic Professional Stereo Headphones (2009)
New Sennheiser RS 126 Stereo Headphones (2018)
I chuckled how this thread has refused to stay on topic, yet on topic in that we are keeping ourselves entertained during lockdown.

Well, somehow there is something odd going on, that the older thinks early 21st century is vintage where the younger thinks vintage is mid 20th century. Ha. :p

Despite being a two bedroom flat, must be a very large one, as I don't nearly have much as you and I am busting at the seams with 1,248 square foot house (I didn't want a big house, just happened). The front room the front wall is taken up with the horizontal console, which by the way is date stamped May 1964. Though there is also a spinet organ in there too. Each front bedroom has a wall of bookcases, one of them has the spinet piano (that was fun moving that myself down the hall and into the room). One of these former bedrooms is mostly used for sewing and tailoring, have the industrial sewing machine in there, however, no room for audio unless I get the old transistor to work. The other former bedroom is a den and has the 1960s cabinet speakers hooked to an inexpensive amplifier (until someday get a nice tube unit) and U-Turn turntable. So in that we both have similar desire to have music in every room of the home.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Shouldn't it be the other way around? We of the older generation think of mid-20th century as vintage (both of my vintage systems are from the 1960-1980 period) while the youngsters might consider the early 21st century (such as my modern system from 2008) as vintage? What's funny also is that I was surprised at how Americans call things a few decades old as vintage. In India where I grew up, antique and vintage things were usually several hundred years old! The US is a young country, relatively speaking.

Glad to hear of your systems and arrangement. My flat now is 1300 square feet, my older flat, with two full bathrooms, was 1600 square feet. I don't know if these flats would be large in your estimation. You seem to think your house, at close to 1300 square feet, is a big house! It is all relative, I suppose.

The Nakamichi Dragon cassette player is arguably the best ever built by a genius of an engineer, Mr Nakamichi. When I set it up, I first played a cassette tape a friend had made from an LP of a concert in Denmark by Sara Vaughan. It sounded so fantastic and so rich and resonant, I felt like I was actually standing in the concert hall! In the eighties when it came out, it cost close to $2500, I've heard. I picked it up for $1000, a bargain.

Likewise, the Revox reel-to-reel tape player built in West Germany, is also a fantastic system, one of the top in the 1960s. It's in great shape, but I have only a small number of tapes to play on it.

The new Polk speakers are also splendid, especially after they mature over the years. Not vintage, though.
 
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Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
Shouldn't it be the other way around? We of the older generation think of mid-20th century as vintage (both of my vintage systems are from the 1960-1980 period) while the youngsters might consider the early 21st century (such as my modern system from 2008) as vintage? What's funny also is that I was surprised at how Americans call things a few decades old as vintage. In India where I grew up, antique and vintage things were usually several hundred years old! The US is a young country, relatively speaking.
I misunderstood because of the dates stated with the audio equipment, my understanding was those were manufacturing dates. Whoops. So yes, since they do date pre about 1980, society says this is vintage. I myself a product of the 1980s, I don't yet feel it is. Then there is the fact I was raised by my Grandparents and the home was basically frozen in time before 1970.

Interesting how age is relative. It makes sense, if your history is long, then takes longer for something to fit in the long history. I would say in my mind, there is a difference between pieces of the first half of the 20th Century and those about pre 20th Century, in that a real historic antique is the latter. I think part of this is because by the late Victorian, everything became manufactured, no longer hand made. I still cherish my family Edwardian pieces, however, not the same level as those hand crafted. I would say Asian is of course different, as pieces are still made by hand and once they are 100 years old, then do become antiques in the minds of Americans. I have some Asian furniture and a very large lacquer room dividing screen, however, I am clueless on their age, so I certainly wouldn't call them antique.


Glad to hear of your systems and arrangement. My flat now is 1300 square feet, my older flat, with two full bathrooms, was 1600 square feet. I don't know if these flats would be large in your estimation. You seem to think your house, at close to 1300 square feet, is a big house! It is all relative, I suppose.
The home I grew up in was barely 1,100 square feet, with most of it being in the public rooms, so the three bedrooms were small. This house feels larger in part because of the more equal distribution of space, however, I much prefer the public space given priority, especially having an organ and console. That is the other thing, how much stuff is the individual putting in the space. 6,000 books will feel different in 1,600 square feet than 1,300 square feet, might feel too tight and therefore myself wouldn't feel it a large home.


The Nakamichi Dragon cassette player is arguably the best ever built by a genius of an engineer, Mr Nakamichi. When I set it up, I first played a cassette tape a friend had made from an LP of a concert in Denmark by Sara Vaughan. It sounded so fantastic and so rich and resonant, I felt like I was actually standing in the concert hall! In the eighties when it came out, it cost close to $2500, I've heard. I picked it up for $1000, a bargain.
Wow, that reads delightful! Fun learning something everyday. I bet now they are worth far more to those in the know.


Likewise, the Revox reel-to-reel tape player built in West Germany, is also a fantastic system, one of the top in the 1960s. It's in great shape, but I have only a small number of tapes to play on it.
I totally missed there was a reel-to-reel, what can one even play on such a system? Were reels commercially available?


The new Polk speakers are also splendid, especially after they mature over the years. Not vintage, though.
I didn't know speakers age, all I know is the vintage paper cones sound better than the modern units.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Thank you for all your nice responses and comments.

Reel-to-reel tapes are available on eBay, and probably in other specialized online shops. I have not made an active effort recently after buying a few on eBay some years ago. LOL, the trouble with having all these interests is that that one doesn't have enough time to devote to all of them, so I cycle through periods when I focus on one hobby or interest. Writing is an exception, I write most days, first thing very early in the morning.

Speakers do age, but only when they are used, not just through the passage of time. They ripen, they begin to sound richer, more sonorous, deeper. They have more volume (in the sense of fullness, not loudness). Not sure if I am using the right terms, but good speakers just get better with extended use. And folks much more steeped in the audiophile domain and more knowledgeable than me, have said this. The two Polks I have are bookshelf speakers, but the sound they generate is like that produced by a set of floor speakers. A pair of them cost me around $300 brand new in 2010.

My audio expert friend Steve, who helped me with all this, also helped me work on the two hand-built stands I mention in the first vintage system (on which the Polks sit). They are of lovely pink oak, and constructed as two-foot tall stands with platforms on the top and a conduit between the platform and the base to fill with sand to weigh down the stand and prevent vibration (I have not done this yet, not really needed). I am proud of my workmanship on these stands, directed by Steve, of course, and using his workshop equipment. The hand-milled points were also made there.
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
Thank you for all your nice responses and comments.
The same to you too, I have much enjoyed our conversation.


Reel-to-reel tapes are available on eBay, and probably in other specialized online shops. I have not made an active effort recently after buying a few on eBay some years ago. LOL, the trouble with having all these interests is that that one doesn't have enough time to devote to all of them, so I cycle through periods when I focus on one hobby or interest. Writing is an exception, I write most days, first thing very early in the morning.
Interesting there are audiophiles who's interest is reel-to-reels, guess like everything in life, some folks are interested in things others don't know even exists.

As to having multiple interests, I totally understand about moving around them. I am trying to have a primary, like your writing, as in this time I have had for thinking I'm realizing I'm moving too much. Previous to the current season, I also got rid of projects recognizing I had too many interests. Maybe do as you have done and have a primary and one secondary at a time.


Speakers do age, but only when they are used, not just through the passage of time. They ripen, they begin to sound richer, more sonorous, deeper. They have more volume (in the sense of fullness, not loudness). Not sure if I am using the right terms, but good speakers just get better with extended use. And folks much more steeped in the audiophile domain and more knowledgeable than me, have said this. The two Polks I have are bookshelf speakers, but the sound they generate is like that produced by a set of floor speakers. A pair of them cost me around $300 brand new in 2010.
Appreciate knowing this, guess another reason to get the den sorted (right now boxes of family papers and photographs waiting for proper storage limited by finances) and get to using those cabinet speakers. Good to know heaven forbid anything happened, they are replaceable, that had been a mild concern of mine.


My audio expert friend Steve, who helped me with all this, also helped me work on the two hand-built stands I mention in the first vintage system (on which the Polks sit). They are of lovely pink oak, and constructed as two-foot tall stands with platforms on the top and a conduit between the platform and the base to fill with sand to weigh down the stand and prevent vibration (I have not done this yet, not really needed). I am proud of my workmanship on these stands, directed by Steve, of course, and using his workshop equipment. The hand-milled points were also made there.
How nice, especially to have such a friend. Guess kind of built a console without the cabinet.


So I got looking at Nakamichi and apparently well into the 1990s they were still producing fine equipment with a rich sound, though of course not the level of the Dragon, certainly good enough for most discerning audiophiles apparently as have quite the following. From what I read, they are a value, in that the cost achieves significantly more quality than other options, especially when looking at the cost of some of the units is the starting price for a modern unit. Doing further research, there is a suggestion going with a DR series unit is the better choice, as the older units parts are no longer available and have a higher chance of being warn out, especially as the 1990s units came at the tail end of tapes so were not nearly used as much. I have had financial setbacks out of my control, however, one can have a desire and eventually probate will be over. I am not needing something extraordinary, especially as my tapes are are basic and some are recordings of family members, though be nice to know they are not being damaged and the sound is basically as intended. The other reason I been desiring a tape deck is to digitize some of the tapes. When the opportunity comes, will look into getting a DR-3.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Yes, there is a bunch of Nakamichi aficionados out there, and their advice is probably well taken. You hit the nail on the head when you talked about parts becoming unavailable as the years go by. Also, it is not easy to find people who are skilled at fixing these old technology instruments. These issues are widespread and not just confined to audio equipment. Computers in general, software and hardware, all become obsolete, so maintenance becomes harder as the years advance.

I've heard that the Library of Congress has a unit whose full-time work is to archive materials from older media to newer media -- Hollerith cards, magnetic tape, paper tape, larger and smaller floppy disks and hard disks, and of course solid state drives. They are all in various states of obsolescence, so this is a never-ending project! Well, as they say, in life, change is the only constant.
 
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