Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
Yes, there is a bunch of Nakamichi aficionados out there, and their advice is probably well taken. You hit the nail on the head when you talked about parts becoming unavailable as the years go by. Also, it is not easy to find people who are skilled at fixing these old technology instruments. These issues are widespread and not just confined to audio equipment. Computers in general, software and hardware, all become obsolete, so maintenance becomes harder as the years advance.
I wouldn't have learned of Nakamichi if you hadn't had this wonderful conversation with me.

As for technology aging, technology itself, in the form of the internet, has helped with this. For example, the only way I could keep a Volkswagen Type 3 on the road is with the online NOS parts availability. I bet the same for Nakamichi and other audio equipment. I'm okay with a fine piece of equipment requiring more work to keep it going, I would say I would even prefer it. One of the things I want to learn is how to at least re cap a radio, if not know how to do all the work, as I desire to keep these tube radios in working condition all my life and rather not be reliant on others.


I've heard that the Library of Congress has a unit whose full-time work is to archive materials from older media to newer media -- Hollerith cards, magnetic tape, paper tape, larger and smaller floppy disks and hard disks, and of course solid state drives. They are all in various states of obsolescence, so this is a never-ending project! Well, as they say, in life, change is the only constant.
How interesting, wonder how many are employed in that department. I also wonder how they decide what to save, since we know not everything can be saved.
 

drpeter

Super Member
One of my colleagues at my university here was a big aficionado of audio, vinyl, and tube amplifiers. The sound of his system was beyond this world! Superb quality, but he was constantly having to replace the tubes which would get blown on a regular basis. There was a supplier of these tubes in a nearby town, so he had a deal with the chap. This was in the nineties. Alas, my colleague passed away some years ago, and I have no idea what happened to his audio equipment or his massive collection of LPs.

The Library of Congress gets a copy of every book published in the world plus other materials -- 180 million items are catalogued, more than 460 languages are represented, and more than half of the total collection is in foreign languages. it is a massive collection, the most comprehensive library in the world. Next is the British Library in London (150 million items). Then the New York Public Library at 55 million and the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris at 40 million.

The Library of Congress holdings are so enormous that the old physical card catalogue takes up space the size of a city block! I don't know if the cards have all been digitized. In addition to books, they also collect other forms of information storage -- periodicals, pamphlets, newspapers, on and on. And then there is all the stuff that started life on now-obsolete media. Massive!

Part of the catalogues:


1608514886779.png
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
One of my colleagues at my university here was a big aficionado of audio, vinyl, and tube amplifiers. The sound of his system was beyond this world! Superb quality, but he was constantly having to replace the tubes which would get blown on a regular basis. There was a supplier of these tubes in a nearby town, so he had a deal with the chap. This was in the nineties. Alas, my colleague passed away some years ago, and I have no idea what happened to his audio equipment or his massive collection of LPs.
Wonder why he kept blowing tubes, the ones in the organ and both consoles are originals and over 50 years old.

Hopefully his collection has gone to good homes and being enjoyed.


The Library of Congress gets a copy of every book published in the world plus other materials -- 180 million items are catalogued, more than 460 languages are represented, and more than half of the total collection is in foreign languages. it is a massive collection, the most comprehensive library in the world. Next is the British Library in London (150 million items). Then the New York Public Library at 55 million and the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris at 40 million.

The Library of Congress holdings are so enormous that the old physical card catalogue takes up space the size of a city block! I don't know if the cards have all been digitized. In addition to books, they also collect other forms of information storage -- periodicals, pamphlets, newspapers, on and on. And then there is all the stuff that started life on now-obsolete media. Massive!

Part of the catalogues:


View attachment 52445
I know some about the Library of Congress, in part because my Oma had one of her works published and so a copy of it is in the Library, plus I know they have a collection of manuals and other literature for Singer sewing machines (which my industrial is). What I did not know was how close in size to the British Library, which I understand is far older. Also fascinating the card catalogue is so massive it takes up the space of city block, better know where you are going! Ha.
 

drpeter

Super Member
I am not sure why the tubes kept getting blown either. I know very little about those things.

You use the word Oma, which I heard used (Oma and Opa) when I lived in Amsterdam on a visiting professor stint years ago. So I'm wondering if you have Dutch or Belgian ancestry. I love the Dutch people and the country. They were wonderful and helpful and friendly when I lived there.
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
I am not sure why the tubes kept getting blown either. I know very little about those things.
If it was during the 1960s and 1970s, I say it was evil rock and roll. :p


You use the word Oma, which I heard used (Oma and Opa) when I lived in Amsterdam on a visiting professor stint years ago. So I'm wondering if you have Dutch or Belgian ancestry. I love the Dutch people and the country. They were wonderful and helpful and friendly when I lived there.
Oma and Opa is used in all the Germanic countries, though, yes I do have Dutch heritage from Oma's father's family. Oma's mother's family was German and Swiss, by the way. The former was Mennonite Brethren and the latter Mennonite and Quaker (and we are related to President Hoover who before was President financially helped the family in our time of need).
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
Very interesting to note the Dutch and German connections. And of course the relation to President Hoover.
I take it you are of English decent?

I myself find it interesting that Dad ended up unintentionally marrying a woman related to Samuel Huntington, so in a way related to Presidents on both sides of the family. For some reason, Americans have forgotten about the Continental Congress and their Presidents. What is frustrating is there were three Brothers from England who all Huntingtons are from, I can trace back either side, just not yet connect the linage in the middle.

The other thing that gets me is how well off and well connected my maternal side was until recent times. Now look how I am not part of society, not contributing, instead a burden to the community because in part no connections to help me up. Do know the divorce had a big impact too, my maternal Grandfather offered Dad a huge share in his company and for some reason Dad turned it down. That money ended up later being squandered by my Grandmother who was clueless about money as her husband did it all for her.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Huntington too? How interesting! You're right, Washington was not the first President, really. But that's Americans for you -- memories tend to be short, LOL.

As for me, I am not of English descent, but of Asian Indian ancestry. I was born to Indian parents in Colonial Malaya, where my Dad worked for the British until he retired in 1960, shortly after Malaya gained independence from the British. But I went to English schools in Malaya and later in newly-independent India. I came to the US 45 years ago, for doctoral work in cognitive psychology, and later specialized in cognitive neuroscience, mathematical modelling, and so on. I am now an American citizen.
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
Huntington too? How interesting! You're right, Washington was not the first President, really. But that's Americans for you -- memories tend to be short, LOL.
And Americans teach the history which they want to propagate. I have recently discovered programs on British history and find it fascinating, in part as it provides context for early American history (ex. look how the British loved their royalty).


As for me, I am not of English descent, but of Asian Indian ancestry. I was born to Indian parents in Colonial Malaya, where my Dad worked for the British until he retired in 1960, shortly after Malaya gained independence from the British. But I went to English schools in Malaya and later in newly-independent India. I came to the US 45 years ago, for doctoral work in cognitive psychology, and later specialized in cognitive neuroscience, mathematical modelling, and so on. I am now an American citizen.
Interesting, now I'm desiring to know the name of the book, as I wasn't aware of Malaya as a country.

As to coming here for a Doctorate, interesting how life works out, we both are living in a place because of coming for higher education and ended up staying.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Sorry, I am not sure I quite follow -- which book are you referring to?

Malaya was the source of about 95% of the world's rubber and tin until the fifties. Malaya was crucial therefore in wartime, and the Japanese really put a dent in the Allied war effort by controlling the supply of rubber, especially.

What country did you come from originally?
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
Sorry, I am not sure I quite follow -- which book are you referring to?
I thought you wrote one on the history of Malaya?


Malaya was the source of about 95% of the world's rubber and tin until the fifties. Malaya was crucial therefore in wartime, and the Japanese really put a dent in the Allied war effort by controlling the supply of rubber, especially.
See that is the kind of history and information they need to be teaching in schools instead of how to put a condom onto a cucumber. No wonder America arrogantly thinks they are the best and should be the world's police force, they forget who they were/are relent on, past and present.


What country did you come from originally?
I'm not sure I understand this question. My family mostly came before the American Revolution. However, the exceptions are my Dutch ancestors were refugees from Russia and came here in 1878 and my maternal Grandfather's paternal grandmother was an Irish immigrant. By the way, I am a member of the SAR.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Oh, I thought you were referring to something else. The novels I wrote (two actually) have not been published yet. I am looking for an agent in the UK. While they are fictional there are historical events depicted in them.

I thought that you were more of a recent immigrant! Looks like I was wrong, sorry. You may have mentioned this in an earlier thread, which I probably forgot.
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
Oh, I thought you were referring to something else. The novels I wrote (two actually) have not been published yet. I am looking for an agent in the UK. While they are fictional there are historical events depicted in them.
And somehow I misunderstood it was a novel, somehow thought was non fiction, appreciate the clarification.


I thought that you were more of a recent immigrant! Looks like I was wrong, sorry. You may have mentioned this in an earlier thread, which I probably forgot.
Maybe it is my mannerism or the way I come off, interesting.
 

drpeter

Super Member
The titles of the two novels are: The Colony of Grace and Imperium. They are part of a planned trilogy of which two are completed and the second is being revised. The third novel is tentatively titled Last Details. The first is set partly during the Japanese Occupation and centres around the execution of an Indian doctor for collaborating with the British, the second during the Malayan Emergency (Insurrection) of the fifties, and the third is set during the months preceding the British departure from Malaya.

I collected together almost 50 books on the Pacific War, including a detailed blow by blow account of the Japanese advance into Malaya from the north ending in the fall of Singapore and the British surrender at the Ford factory atop Bukit Timah Hill: The Japanese Thrust by Lionel Wigmore, published by the Australian War Memorial.

I read about ten accounts of the sinking of the Prince of Wales and Repulse in the South China Sea by Japanese strike aircraft, in order to make my own description as historically accurate as possible. Curiously enough the best account was by an American naval historian, Stanley Falk -- Seventy Days to Singapore. I have similar source materials for the second and third novels, which are, respectively, about a hostage crisis, and about an assassination attempt.

Humanizing history through the stories of individuals is something of a writer's passion for me. Fiction is actually about exhuming the truth that lies beneath the surface structure of our lives. Also, most of the stories about WWII have been told by Westerners, by British, American, French and the like. These writers are also white as opposed to the coloured people of many of the colonies.

But there are other perspectives on the war, other stories to be told by the people whom the colonizers left to their fate, especially in Malaya. These subject peoples have a different perspective on the war, and my humble efforts are to tell those stories.

Historians in the west are only now beginning to appreciate these aspects. How many Americans know that in the First World War, 1.25 million Indian soldiers took part in the battles in Belgium and France? How many know that there were about 75,000 dead, and a whole slew of Victoria Crosses won for bravery by these soldiers and their English officers?

And in the Second World War, how many know that an entire Indian Division was wiped out in the assault on Monte Cassino, along with one of New Zealand? That Indians and New Zealanders liberated the city of Florence? These stories have not been important for Western novelists or filmmakers, and I understand that. But it is useful to re-examine some of this history. Most Americans even ignore the massive Russian contribution to winning WWII.

So it goes.

My apologies for taking this thread so far afield from the original topic! I guess we kept discussing the issues that came up and ventured into history and memory. If a moderator wishes to move some of this thread to a different forum, the one for general topics, I will certainly have no objection, LOL.
 
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Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
The titles of the two novels are: The Colony of Grace and Imperium. They are part of a planned trilogy of which two are completed and the second is being revised. The third novel is tentatively titled Last Details. The first is set partly during the Japanese Occupation and centres around the execution of an Indian doctor for collaborating with the British, the second during the Malayan Emergency (Insurrection) of the fifties, and the third is set during the months preceding the British departure from Malaya.
Interesting authoring a trilogy. I did look for them with no success.


I collected together almost 50 books on the Pacific War, including a detailed blow by blow account of the Japanese advance into Malaya from the north ending in the fall of Singapore and the British surrender at the Ford factory atop Bukit Timah Hill: The Japanese Thrust by Lionel Wigmore, published by the Australian War Memorial.

I read about ten accounts of the sinking of the Prince of Wales and Repulse in the South China Sea by Japanese strike aircraft, in order to make my own description as historically accurate as possible. Curiously enough the best account was by an American naval historian, Stanley Falk -- Seventy Days to Singapore. I have similar source materials for the second and third novels, which are, respectively, about a hostage crisis, and about an assassination attempt.
That's more than a few books, bet took more than a moment to read all those and compile notes. Interesting an American provide the best account, I put that in my wish list of books.


Humanizing history through the stories of individuals is something of a writer's passion for me. Fiction is actually about exhuming the truth that lies beneath the surface structure of our lives. Also, most of the stories about WWII have been told by Westerners, by British, American, French and the like.These writers are also white as opposed to the coloured people of many of the colonies.

But there are other perspectives on the war, other stories to be told by the people whom the colonizers left to their fate, especially in Malaya. These subject peoples have a different perspective on the war, and my humble efforts are to tell those stories.

Historians in the west are only now beginning to appreciate these aspects. How many Americans know that in the First World War, 1.25 million Indian soldiers took part in the battles in Belgium and France? How many know that there were about 75,000 dead, and a whole slew of Victoria Crosses won for bravery by these soldiers and their English officers?

And in the Second World War, how many know that an entire Indian Division was wiped out in the assault on Monte Cassino, along with one of New Zealand? That Indians and New Zealanders liberated the city of Florence? These have not been important for Western novelists or filmmakers, and I understand that. But it is useful to re-examine some of this history. Most Americans even ignore the massive Russian contribution to winning WWII.

So it goes.
I would totally agree history must include be human and personal, must connect to the individual. Before I experienced this, history meant nothing. Then once we see individuals and make connections, then it starts making sense. I did not know this history you have kindly shared, glad someone is bringing it forward and including it in their novels. Hopefully more novels and histories are written on the forgotten history from a different perspective.
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
I mentioned earlier that they had not been published. I am looking for an agent at the moment.
Guess my mind is still Jello, I swear said the first had been published.

Like last night re-setting a waistband, I know how to do it yet the darn stitches were going all wrong. Thankfully the other side went with no difficulties.
 

Tiger

Advanced Member
For some reason, Americans have forgotten about the Continental Congress and their Presidents.
These "presidents" were simply people who presided over a colonial consultative body which did not possess legislative power. These "presidents" did not possess executive power, either. Understand, too, that even after American independence from Britain, the Articles of Confederation - the first constitution of the States - created one branch of general government: a legislative branch. It wasn't until this constitution was "revised" and the current Constitution was ratified by the States that a general government consisting of three branches (legislative, executive and judicial ) was created. The executive under the new Constitution did possess powers, as delineated in Article Two, Section Two.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Very interesting.Thanks for the clarifications, @Tiger .

I have been confused about this issue, to be quite honest. I understand that the three branches of government were created after the revision, but I have known several people -- and some of them native-born American history specialists -- who regarded these Presidents as the first ones, before the three branches etc, were created. Some of these people corrected me rather sharply when I said I thought the first President was Washington!

Perhaps there is room for disagreement between historians. I read a fair bit of American history prior to my taking up US citizenship -- I thought it was a good chance to educate myself about the country I was going to adopt as my own. A country and a people who, despite being exasperating at times, I had come to love very much. I was very familiar with the ins and outs of the history of US immigration and on legal discussions of citizenship and alienage. Professor Linda Bosniak's important work The Citizen and the Alien lays the groundwork for the American view of citizenship, critical in a nation of immigrants.

I also read Francis Parkman's Montcalm and Wolf on the buildup to 1776, for instance and the shorter version of the Carl Sandburg biography of Lincoln -- I have the six-volume set, but that is a long project! And we also did some of the important events and milestones in American history when I was in my boys' school in India -- we had World history, British history and Indian history. I don't remember all of the details, but it is easy enough to find out.

I don't know, it is not a big deal for me, but maybe American historians themselves could come to some agreement about the Presidential hierarchy, so that immigrant citizens like myself could be given the straight dope, LOL. You never know, this could pop up on some version of the citizenship test in the future! Although I wouldn't have to take it, I am already a citizen.
 
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Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
These "presidents" were simply people who presided over a colonial consultative body which did not possess legislative power. These "presidents" did not possess executive power, either. Understand, too, that even after American independence from Britain, the Articles of Confederation - the first constitution of the States - created one branch of general government: a legislative branch. It wasn't until this constitution was "revised" and the current Constitution was ratified by the States that a general government consisting of three branches (legislative, executive and judicial ) was created. The executive under the new Constitution did possess powers, as delineated in Article Two, Section Two.
Fine, moderators with some admirative duties. The thing is that these first governing bodies experiences led to the current three branch government. I doubt most Americans know this, instead think the three branch government was the first and only. Am I wrong about this?
 
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